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Newbie Anglo C/D Question 3


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I have had my concertina for about 2 years but have only been playing it 'seriously' since Christmas. I am doing about 1 hour a day but need a few questions answering if you could be so kind.

 

Question 3.

 

Playing in G - whenever I need the E on the C line I am OK so long as the next note is the D below or the F/G/A above. I hold my four fingers on the G line - no finger on the lowest note. When I have to go to the E on the C line and play a note higher than A next, I find that my fingers get all over the place. Sometimes, I find myself playing on the C Line and using the G Line F sharp as an easier operation but would prefer not to do that.

 

I am not sure if anyone can actually advise, given this is a print medium (smile) but any thoughts would be useful.

 

David

Edited by Long Haired David
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I have had my concertina for about 2 years but have only been playing it 'seriously' since Christmas. I am doing about 1 hour a day but need a few questions answering if you could be so kind.

 

Question 3.

 

Playing in G - whenever I need the E on the C line I am OK so long as the next note is the D below or the F/G/A above. I hold my four fingers on the G line - no finger on the lowest note. When I have to go to the E on the C line and play a note higher than A next, I find that my fingers get all over the place. Sometimes, I find myself playing on the C Line and using the G Line F sharp as an easier operation but would prefer not to do that.

 

I am not sure if anyone can actually advise, given this is a print medium (smile) but any thoughts would be useful.

 

David

 

Heya David,

 

First it would be good for you to learn the right terms. Am I wrong or your concertina is actually a C/G concertina, and not a "C/D" concertina as your title says? It's important you try to use the right terms and right keys to define your instrument.

 

Also, what you call a "line" is actually a "row". The C row and the G row.

 

As for the rest, you could easily search concertina.net because there are dozens of threads explaining technique to play the anglo. You can decide to play 'on the row', which means using mainly one single row, or 'cross row', which means you use all the rows. I personally try to play 'cross row', meaning I switch from the C row to the G row and don't really use a main single row.

 

One important thing I think, I'd say you should always leave your fingers on the C row as your 'home' position, and go down to reach the G row when needed... if one day you get a 30 buttons with an accidental row at the top, being in the middle row will be ideal position. Also, your index finger should be positioned and be use to play notes on the first column... your second fingers on the second column, etc. Don't use the same finger to go all over the keyboard, they should be assigned to their own position.

 

If you search the site a little you'll find lot of good posts about that.

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David,

 

Glad to hear that you've decided to focus more heavily on learning to play your concertina, you'll find you can get a lot of music out of a 20-button model and if you later transition to a 30-button Anglo you'll be able to transfer and use everything you've learned.

 

There's no problem with asking questions here, but I thought I'd point out the obvious point that there are several good concertina tutors available, in both written and video format, that will really help get you oriented as to the basics of fingering. Most tutors center on a certain style of music and the related playing style that's best suited for it, and some are better than others, but it's worthwhile exploring what's available and to consider purchasing one to work with. There are also some YouTube tutoring videos online that might be worth exploring.

 

There is a handy listing of many available concertina tutors on concertina.net here. Be sure to scroll down the page to read the tutor-specific commentary on the workshops/classes available. For that matter, you should also make a point to scroll down to the bottom of the concertina.net home page. I think people tend to overlook the "Learning to Play" section of links there.

 

If you've already been working with a tutor, it might be helpful to acquire a second one. I've found it's sometimes helpful to get a second perspective on how to do something, but I caution here that at the early stages of learning you should pick tutors that compliment each other, that is, teach the same basic style of play.

 

Good luck with your Anglo efforts and don't hesitate to post further questions here if you get stuck on a point or don't understand some element of playing.

 

Bruce

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Hi David,

 

You'll find Alan Day's online tutor invaluable - it's here. You can download all the files and just work your way through.

 

There is also some excellent resources from Roger Digby here which is also very helpful.

 

Enjoy your concertina!

 

Best wishes,

 

David Savage

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