Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
richard

FEAR OF NOT PLAYING

Recommended Posts

Hello

 

I am going away for a bit over two weeks to a country in Central America that is known for its crime against Tourists and citizens. I have a special less "valuable" and precious concertina which I got for travels . But it turns out now I love this instrument too and don't want anything to happen to it or loose it.

 

The idea of not playing for 2.5 weeks scares me as if I would lose or forget something. Also playing and relaxing while on vacations is one of my favorite parts of travel. I have considered not bringing it along.

 

What happens when you don't play for a few weeks?

 

Richard

Edited by richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of weeks is nothing, you will be fine. I will add though, that I stopped playing my fiddle for a very long time, because I enjoyed the concertina much more, and it was very depressing when I took it out again and realized I could not read the music anymore. I had to spend a couple hours going through a beginners book before it came back to me. You can definitely "loose it", but it takes a lot longer than two weeks.

 

Of course practice makes perfect and I hate not playing every day.

 

NNY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello

 

I am going away for a bit over two weeks to a country in Central America that is known for its crime against Tourists and citizens. I have a special less "valuable" and precious concertina which I got for travels . But it turns out now I love this instrument too and don't want anything to happen to it or loose it.

 

The idea of not playing for 2.5 weeks scares me as if I would lose or forget something. Also playing and relaxing while on vacations is one of my favorite parts of travel. I have considered not bringing it along.

 

What happens when you don't play for a few weeks?

 

Richard

Don't worry, Richard - you'll be fine. You're a good enough player that the ability to play is imprinted in your brain and hands by now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard,

You should have bought that 26b Jones I had for sale! Actually, I have another, good enough for play and practice but not so good as to break your heart if something unfortunate happened (and you had a better instrument waiting at home.)

 

In truth it might be good for your playing with a two week break. Brain and autonomic systems may have a chance to consolidate information. You could be surprised at how ready you are to learn new tunes and techniques after an "enforced" vacation.

 

Good luck and have a great time.

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happens when you don't play for a few weeks?

 

Richard

Do'nt worry Richard. There is a good chance that your playing will be even better.smile.gif

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard, I am currently in Vietnam for six months (been here 4.5 months, leaving in two months) and I had to bring my concertina for such a long trip, and thanks goodness I did! But last year I came to Vietnam for three weeks and I did not bring my concertina. I was afraid it would be a big step backward in my playing, but when I came back after 1-2 days of practice I was back in shape, as if I never left! I was very surprised as I'm always trying to practice a tune at least once a week for fears I would forget how to play it solidly, but I could go through my tunes with ease!

 

It's interesting how when learning a new tune, I practice it every day for at least a week, but sometimes when I skip a day and come back to the tune a day later, I play it even better than the last time! The brain can work in mysterious ways :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happens when you don't play for a few weeks?

 

RIchard,

I agree with all the previous posters - your playing will not suffer!

 

There are two aspects to music: knowing your instrument and knowing your pieces. Learning the instrument is like learning to swim or ride a bicycle - once you're competent, this competence never really goes away. As soon as you put your hands through those straps, they'll know what to do.

 

With your practised pieces, the same is true to a great extent. If a piece has some very abstruse, non-instinctive fingerings in it, it may take you one or two run-throughs to get these up to speed, but it won't be a matter of re-learning them, just jogging your memory of them.

 

I find that a couple of weeks' break can actually improve my playing of a piece, because I play it less automatically, more consciously, and sometimes see opportunities to improve the phrasing, the tempo or the dynamics. I must add that when I take a longer break (i.e. longer than a holiday that I can afford ;) ) from concertina playing, it's usually to concentrate on another instrument, so I'm still into the music as such. And when I play the same pieces on another instrument and come back to the concertina, I usually realise that I've learnt something about the piece, and play it better. Each instrument makes different demands on you, but in return helps you in a different way.

 

So perhaps a good tip for the holidays would be to leave your valuable concertina at home, and sing, hum or whistle the tunes of your pieces. All these activities make demands on the finite resource of your breath, and may give you some good ideas about phrasing.

 

At any rate - don't worry about it. Have a lovely holiday!

 

Cheers,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think ter is a sort of latent learning that goes on so a break can bring you back from a plateau and you make progress while not playing. Have you thougt of one of Mike Eskin's iPod apps for practice! He'sa member here as Eskin

Edited by michael sam wild

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i think ter is a sort of latent learning that goes on so a break can bring you back from a plateau and you make progress while not playing. Have you thougt of one of Mike Eskin's iPod apps for practice! He'sa member here as Eskin

If tourists are targeted for theft, do you really think the thieves would be disinterested in an iPod?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a special less "valuable" and precious concertina which I got for travels . But it turns out now I love this instrument too and don't want anything to happen to it or loose it.

Looks like you need to get another disposable instrument, and try not to get too attached to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

Thanks for the good advice and personal experience. If I had an ipod I definitely wouldn't mind if it was stolen.

 

I am tending towards bringing my travel concertina and just being a bit more cautious when I carry it

around. Sitting in a hammock at my hotel in front of Lake Atitlan should be just perfect.

 

Apparently cameras, ipods laptops and such, are most the desirable and more easily transformed into $$ than funky push-fiddles. I will bring a camera and would gladly hand it over.

 

Richard

Edited by richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am tending towards bringing by travel concertina and just being a bit more cautious about when I carry around.

 

Perhaps you should consider carrying it around inside a non-descript plastic supermarket bag, to disguise it, like I do.

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello

 

I am going away for a bit over two weeks to a country in Central America that is known for its crime against Tourists and citizens. I have a special less "valuable" and precious concertina which I got for travels . But it turns out now I love this instrument too and don't want anything to happen to it or loose it.

 

The idea of not playing for 2.5 weeks scares me as if I would lose or forget something. Also playing and relaxing while on vacations is one of my favorite parts of travel. I have considered not bringing it along.

 

What happens when you don't play for a few weeks?

 

Richard

Buy borrow or hire a local bandoneon and when deep in the jungle you can charm the baddies with tango music...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard, I've been to Lake Atitlan and found the people wonderful and we never even locked our doors. You're more likely to get everything wet as the only reasonable mode of transportation is by water bus which is quite a trip in itself. Once your out of Guatemala City it is a very welcoming country. I would also suggest spending some time in Antegua if you get a chance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello

 

I am pleased to say I had a great time in Guatemala. I brought my wee Lachenal 26 button with me and neither of us were molested or interfered with, or even looked at funny. I played everyday and being able to play was a wonderful part of my trip. I spent a week at Lake Atitlan and I would play sitting on the porch of our hotel overlooking the lake. Many people (other tourists and locals) kindly commented to me that hearing the concertina was lovely and added to the ambiance of the beautiful magical place. I feel a bit embarrassed about my paranoia now. I recommend Guatemala as a wonderful place to see, and the people are warm, friendly and open.

 

Here I am....

post-290-0-62216200-1300054203_thumb.jpg

Edited by richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...