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Lachenal Edge Beading


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I'm working on restoring a Lachenal metal-ended anglo with metal buttons. Some of the beading that goes around the metal end plate has come away. Does anybody know of a source or have a scrapper that I can buy a piece from?

Thanks

Edited by Paul Read
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Paul

It is quite easy to make a scratch stock and use a broken hacksaw blade to grind the form on, or you could grind a cutter for a Stanley 45 or similar. This is not at all as daunting as it sounds and you could easily make one in 5 minutes on an ordinary Bench Grinder. E mail me if you need more help

Regards Nic

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Paul,

I don't think I've ever seen you ask for anything on this site. You're usually giving the advice. I've worked with metal, wood, plastic, and just about everything else that can be worked with but I've only been involved with concertinas for a few years so please excuse my ignorance. I have no idea what you're asking for and there may be others here that may be able to help if they knew. Could you put up a picture of the beading? OLDNICKILBY's responce was rather technical. What the hell is a Stanley 45?

Like I said, I'm ignorant.

Thanks

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Paul,

I don't think I've ever seen you ask for anything on this site. You're usually giving the advice. I've worked with metal, wood, plastic, and just about everything else that can be worked with but I've only been involved with concertinas for a few years so please excuse my ignorance. I have no idea what you're asking for and there may be others here that may be able to help if they knew. Could you put up a picture of the beading? OLDNICKILBY's responce was rather technical. What the hell is a Stanley 45?

Like I said, I'm ignorant.

Thanks

Fair point. I admit I was making up the name for it! As it happens there is a similar instrument on Ebay. Here's a pic I snaffled. The instrument has wooden end frames. The beading is glued on the end (the shaped part and it also supports the metal end plate) I have a part of that "beading" missing

post-207-0-05394500-1291990226_thumb.jpg

Edited by Paul Read
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Paul, I'm pretty sure that when the concertina was originally made the material for the beading and the frame would have been glued together as a long strip, and the bead formed before the assembly of the frame. Ebony is such brittle material that that working the shape, by hand or by machine, would be very difficult on such a thin strip, but if the ebony was glued to a larger section of tougher wood the process would be much more successful.

 

I have a similar concertina to repair that has the same problem with missing and damaged beading. My plan is to glue some rectangular strips of ebony in place, and then to work the moulding with a scratch stock, as described by Oldnickilby.

 

Here is a nice video showing how to make and use a scratch stock

Edited by Theo
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Paul, I'm pretty sure that when the concertina was originally made the material for the beading and the frame would have been glued together as a long strip, and the bead formed before the assembly of the frame. Ebony is such brittle material that that working the shape, by hand or by machine, would be very difficult on such a thin strip, but if the ebony was glued to a larger section of tougher wood the process would be much more successful.

 

I have a similar concertina to repair that has the same problem with missing and damaged beading. My plan is to glue some rectangular strips of ebony in place, and then to work the moulding with a scratch stock, as described by Oldnickilby.

 

Here is a nice video showing how to make and use a scratch stock

 

Hi y'all,

 

I have also made scratch stocks and formed replacement beads, nice and satisfying to do as well.

 

Or just cheat, phone good old Dave Leese who has a number of scrapped ends etc. with beads, bits of framing and veneers all waiting to be recycled.

 

Dave

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Thanks Dave. I did call Dave Leese who couldn't help this time. I was surprised too!

 

Back to the scratch stock then.

 

A tip, cut the bead rectangular section, and take a bit of soft woods of the bead depth but wide enough to give you something to clamp or grip on. Glue the unshaped bead to the soft wood so that it can be held easily and not be at risk of breaking under the forces of the scratch stock scraping action. BUT glue brown paper into the glue line, one piece to the soft wood, one to the bead, and then glue the two together. Its dead easy to split the bead off later, just don't use a superglue!

 

Dave

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