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For sale: 31-button C/G Dipper County Clare


megmcd2
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As most of you know, several months ago I tried to sell my Dipper County Clare concertina on this forum. After pages of spirited debate, it became clear to me that people didn't like the "auction" format.

 

So let's try this again with a fixed price. A few weeks ago a similar Dipper County Clare instrument sold on this forum for U.S. $8,000.00 plus shipping costs. I'm willing to sell my concertina for the same price. If you missed out on the earlier sale, here's another chance to own a Dipper County Clare.

 

For U.S. $8,000.00 plus shipping costs, I am offering to sell my 31-button C/G Colin Dipper County Clare silver-ended Anglo concertina, serial number 273. It has the seven-fold original leather bellows. This instrument has a sweet, clear tone and is in excellent condition except for minor tarnish on the silver ends; it’s been played only lightly since I bought it new. The original Dipper case will come with the concertina.

 

I'm attaching pictures of this concertina and its key layout.

 

Please respond by private message, and thanks for your interest!

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As most of you know, several months ago I tried to sell my Dipper County Clare concertina on this forum. After pages of spirited debate, it became clear to me that people didn't like the "auction" format.

 

Are you sure it was the auction fomat that put people off?

 

Having seen the photos, I must say, if I had the equivalent of $8000 earmarked for an Anglo concertina, I certainly wouldn't spend it on that one!

It may be just me, but I find that pseudo-first-millennium knotwork on an instrument of a type that was invented in the 19th century in awfully bad taste. And the knotwork is not even cleanly executed!

Wheatstone, Lachenal, Crabb - even Stagi - fretworks each have their own charm, but this IMHO opinion has none. It really cheapens what is probably a pretty good concertina, if the name of Dipper is anything to go by.

 

Still, I suppose there's no accounting for taste!

 

Cheers,

John

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Hello

 

 

 

I think to contribute to a buy/sell posting to say you wouldn't buy what is being offered is in bad taste, unnecessary and inappropriate.

 

Why not start another discussion on these types of end designs(in this situation) which I have seen on other makes of concertinas as well. When someone is just wanting to offer something to somebody who might want to buy it, other people's editorial opinions seem self indulgent ill-will. Where I come from we would call it being a "party pooper"

 

I am reminded of an old Irish saying...."Never loose a good opportunity to say nothing."

 

 

Richard

Edited by richard
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As most of you know, several months ago I tried to sell my Dipper County Clare concertina on this forum. After pages of spirited debate, it became clear to me that people didn't like the "auction" format.

Are you sure it was the auction fomat that put people off?

It could well be that the auction format was a factor, but not the only factor.

It may be just me, but I find that pseudo-first-millennium knotwork on an instrument of a type that was invented in the 19th century in awfully bad taste. And the knotwork is not even cleanly executed!

I doubt that it's
just
you, but I know for a fact that there are others who really like that sort of fretwork.

Still, I suppose there's no accounting for taste!

Just as well, else you'd probably have to pay a tax on it.
:ph34r:

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It may be just me, but I find that pseudo-first-millennium knotwork on an instrument of a type that was invented in the 19th century in awfully bad taste. And the knotwork is not even cleanly executed!

 

Well, as a keen fan of the Antiques Roadshow, I must say to me, the ends look rather Art Nouveau in style ...... & I like them.

 

I also think they are rather appropriate in style, for anyone who would be playing Celtic Music on this instrument.

 

However, looks aside, for me the playability & sound are without doubt, factors which would far outweigh any visual considerations.

For example, my trusty Aeola TT has clearly been round the block a few times, with plenty signs of wear & tear, but to my ears at least, it sounds absolutely wonderful & is a joy to play.

 

Cheers

Dick

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I think to contribute to a buy/sell posting to to say you wouldn't buy what is being offered is in bad taste, unnecessary and inappropriate.

 

Why not start another discussion on these types of end designs(in this situation) which I have seen on other makes of concertinas as well. When someone is just wanting to offer something to somebody who might want to buy it, other peoples editorial opinions seem self indulgent ill-will.

I agree. If you knew something about the concertina that was not obvious and wanted to mention it, that might contribute to the discussion. But in this case, we all can see the fretwork design and form our own opinions about it (I happen to like it myself) without your assistance.

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I think to contribute to a buy/sell posting to to say you wouldn't buy what is being offered is in bad taste, unnecessary and inappropriate.

 

Richard,

 

I completely agree with you. Unless there are known issues with the concertina - ie it's been stolen, or is somehow defective and that's not being disclosed - it is not nice to trash other people's instruments.

 

-David

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Thanks to those of you who've spoken out (publicly and privately) against the criticism of my concertina's beautiful silver work. I'd like to point out that the ends were designed by the Dippers, not by me. This was not a custom instrument; I was simply lucky enough to find it for sale at Lark in the Morning many years ago. So to criticize the design is to insult the Dippers.

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I thought the fretwork and engraving were beautiful, makes me wish I was an anglo player. I have had the pleasure of watching Colin doing some engraving on a simpler instrument and it was a revelation, the design seemed to flow from his fingers onto the metal.

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Hello

 

I think a reasonable intelligent critique of anything, especially of things aesthetic is a valid and interesting activity.

 

I am not saying that I like or dislike the concertina personally or that the Dippers or anyone is above being the subject of intelligent criticism.

 

I was just trying to say in my posting that to critique something that is displayed for the purpose of advertising its availability for sale is inappropriate and dumb. I think when you list something for sale you are definitely not asking people to chime in with why they don't want it and why they don't like it. Doing that could be perceived as undermining the other persons intent. It is naive at best and unfriendly at worst.

 

When I list something in BUY/SELL it is to announce that it is available and to hear why someone out in the ether doesn't want it is off the subject and would be tiresome to me.

 

Richard

Edited by richard
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I was just trying to say in my posting that to critique something that is displayed for the purpose of advertising its availability for sale is inappropriate and dumb. I think when you list something for sale you are definitely not asking people to chime in with why they don't want it and why they don't like it. Doing that could be perceived as undermining the other persons intent. It is naive at best and unfriendly at worst.

 

 

 

RIchad,

 

I'm sorry you see it that way. The only reason why I responded to the original posting was that the prospective seller seemed to be expressing wonderment at the fact that his concetina hadn't been bought first time round. He attributed this to the "auction format" he had proposed, but on seeing the close-up photos, I thought it only fair to point out that the ends are rather idiosyncratic, and might not be everybody's kettle of fish - especially at the very high price he was asking. Somebody who plays exclusively Irish music, or someone who calls their music genre "Celtic" might snap it up, but I'm sure there are a lot of players who would prefer the more classic, universally appropriate foliate ends that are so typical of the concertina. So the market for such an instrument would be narrower than for one of equal quality and price but "normal" appearance.

 

If you deviate from the standard pattern, you're saying something. What this concertina says might be true fo some, but certainly not for all prospective buyers.

 

As to the execution of the ends:

The basic principle of Cetic knotwork is that, if you follow one line along its whole length, it goes alternately over-under-over-under itself and any other lines all the way. There are techniques for designing knotwork patterns that ensure that this is the case. A glance at the photos of the concertina in question shows that the ends do not adhere to this simple principle. But for that price, you could expect everything to be right, couldn't you? OK, that's a very old-fashioned view. Sorry I mentioned it. B)

 

BTW, I've got nothing against knotwork as such. but I prefer it in this context. Scroll down to about the middle of the document, and you'll see what I mean. The instument shown is a reproduction of a Germanic lyre that was built some time before 580. And knotwork was state of the art back then!

 

Cheers,

John

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That harp was great - wish the text was in English or that I had better German.

Bob,

I googled for an English description, but couldn't find one, unfortunately. Google for "Trossingen lyre" or "Trossinger Leier" and you'll find all there is. The German Wikipedia entry has photos of the conserved oiginal.

 

The original was one of the most amazing archaeological finds. It was almost intact, even with the pegs and the bridge still there. All that was missing was the strings and the tailpiece. And that although it was buried with an Alemannic warrior, along with his weapons and some chattels, in the year 580 (according to modern dating methods). So the reconstruction is not conjectural - not even the knotwork decoration. Where conjecture is rife in the Germanic lyre community is around the missing piece - the tailpiece that joined the strings to the button on the end.

The only other lyres we have from this period, like the Sutton Hoo lyre, are extremely fragmentary, and are reconstucted with an awful lot of conjecture.

 

Of interest to the free reed community is that this unique musical find was made in the grounds of the Matthias Hohner company in Trossingen - yes, the harmonica and accordion manufacturer! Just think about it - Hohner churning out the world's most often sold musical instrument, with one of the oldest European instruments lying buried in his yard!

 

History is quirky!

 

Cheers,

John

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Well, add to that the slang term for haminca is 'harp'. :blink:

 

Could be that this derives from the official model designation of Hohner's 2-sided harmonica in C/G, which is "The Echo Harp". My Dad had one, and I (almost literally, but definitely musically) cut my teeth on it, which is why I learned the Anglo so easily later on.

 

BTW, the ancient instrument is actually a lyre, but the contemporary Anglo-Saxon word for it was "haerpe".

 

 

Cheers,

John

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Well, add to that the slang term for haminca is 'harp'. :blink:

 

Could be that this derives from the official model designation of Hohner's 2-sided harmonica in C/G, which is "The Echo Harp". My Dad had one, and I (almost literally, but definitely musically) cut my teeth on it, which is why I learned the Anglo so easily later on.

 

BTW, the ancient instrument is actually a lyre, but the contemporary Anglo-Saxon word for it was "haerpe".

 

 

Cheers,

John

 

 

I would think so , I still have a C/G harp in a nice green box with Alpine meadows and woods on it.

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