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Basque Traditional Music


fernando
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Hola amigos!

 

I learnt this tune from the BTM (Basque Traditional Music hahahahahaha). This people play a diatonic accordion called trikitixa, and they do wonderful music with it! Many tunes are impossible for me to play, they usually do very tricky ornamentation. I only play here the melody, and I give two rounds to the tune.

 

I make a few mistakes, but I think it is possible to make an idea of how the tune goes.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IwT_NePOlI

 

I hope you like it!

 

Fernando

Edited by fernando
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Hola amigos!

 

I learnt this tune from the BTM (Basque Traditional Music hahahahahaha). This people play a diatonic accordion called trikitixa, and they do wonderful music with it! Many tunes are impossible for me to play, they usually do very tricky ornamentation. I only play here the melody, and I give two rounds to the tune.

 

I make a few mistakes, but I think it is possible to make an idea of how the tune goes.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IwT_NePOlI

 

I hope you like it!

 

Fernando

 

Sounds good Fernando.

 

Nice tune and you are making good sense of the melody. Your concertina looks big for an Hexagonal type, is it a Tennor- Treble?

Geoff.

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Thank you Geoff! My concertina is a Wheatstone, the serial number is 27688, 48 buttons. I don't know if this can answer your question...

One way to answer Geoff's question is to know the lowest note:

  • If the lowest note is G below middle C, the concertina would be a treble.
  • If the lowest note is C below middle C, the concertina would be a tenor-treble... or simply tenor, depending on your nomenclature.

Another way is to look up your serial number in the Wheatstone ledgers, where it is one of a series of instruments of model number 22. Wheatstone price lists from that period (instrument from 1917; price lists from 1915 and 1918) show model 22 to be a 48-button treble with nickel-plated ends.

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Thank you Geoff! My concertina is a Wheatstone, the serial number is 27688, 48 buttons. I don't know if this can answer your question...

One way to answer Geoff's question is to know the lowest note:

  • If the lowest note is G below middle C, the concertina would be a treble.
  • If the lowest note is C below middle C, the concertina would be a tenor-treble... or simply tenor, depending on your nomenclature.

Another way is to look up your serial number in the Wheatstone ledgers, where it is one of a series of instruments of model number 22. Wheatstone price lists from that period (instrument from 1917; price lists from 1915 and 1918) show model 22 to be a 48-button treble with nickel-plated ends.

 

 

Ok, right... a model 22, I have one of these too, they are very nice instruments. Yours certainly sounds very good Fernando, maybe there is a little 'optical illusion' effect that makes it look bigger... wide angle lens for instance ?

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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What kind of instrument, Anglo or Duet? you seem to be gettiing a lot of notes out of it.

With thumb loops instead of a hand strap?

Definitely an English... which was confirmed by the Wheatstone ledger entry for his serial number.

By the way does anyone know what the Basque language is related to?

I've been told that no, nobody knows.
B)

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I knew that with the serial number would be enough, I saw the page of the Wheatstone ledger once. Yes, the 29th of November Virginie was born! because I forgot to say that the name of my concertina is Virginie, ma petit Virginie!

 

And nobody knows the origin of the basque. When these people talk I don't understand a single word. Sometimes I can understand Galician, or Catalan. Because it can be similar to Spanish, they must share the same origin or something. But when a basque talks Euskera (that's the name of the language), I don't understand anything. Well, I understand their music! :D

 

Fernando

Edited by fernando
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Hola amigos!

 

I learnt this tune from the BTM (Basque Traditional Music hahahahahaha). This people play a diatonic accordion called trikitixa, and they do wonderful music with it! Many tunes are impossible for me to play, they usually do very tricky ornamentation. I only play here the melody, and I give two rounds to the tune.

 

I make a few mistakes, but I think it is possible to make an idea of how the tune goes.

 

I hope you like it!

 

Fernando

I don't think people are giving you enough credit for your playing. I really enjoy your excellent use of the bellows to put life into the tune. Not enough English players take advantage of that capability. I have a Basque friend who introduced me to the instrument an music a few years ago. I'll have to get her to bring back some more CD's next time she goes home. It is a very lively tradition. Thanks for the treat!

Dana

Edited by Dana Johnson
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And nobody knows the origin of the basque. When these people talk I don't understand a single word. Sometimes I can understand Galician, or Catalan. Because it can be similar to Spanish, they must share the same origin or something. But when a basque talks Euskera (that's the name of the language), I don't understand anything. Well, I understand their music! :D

.. and they don't have a word for concertina, so I had to make one up - trikitixika (little accordeon). And they have dance teams very similar to the English Morris sides.

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Hola amigos!

 

I learnt this tune from the BTM (Basque Traditional Music hahahahahaha). This people play a diatonic accordion called trikitixa, and they do wonderful music with it! Many tunes are impossible for me to play, they usually do very tricky ornamentation. I only play here the melody, and I give two rounds to the tune.

 

I make a few mistakes, but I think it is possible to make an idea of how the tune goes.

 

I hope you like it!

 

Fernando

I don't think people are giving you enough credit for your playing. I really enjoy your excellent use of the bellows to put life into the tune. Not enough English players take advantage of that capability. I have a Basque friend who introduced me to the instrument an music a few years ago. I'll have to get her to bring back some more CD's next time she goes home. It is a very lively tradition. Thanks for the treat!

Dana

 

Thank you Dana! I like what you say about the use of the bellows, because I strongly believe that it can be done with the English system, at least with the small concertinas like mine. I don't know about the bigger ones, I suppose it would be a bit more difficult.

 

But Dana! you don't need to wait for your friend to bring you the cds! there is a lot in youtube, I'll show you some:

 

Just to listen:

 

If someone is able to play this on the concertina I buy him/her 4 jeffries, 5 Wheatstones and 3 Lachenals! (all Anglos hahahaha)

 

 

(in Basque Country there are competitions as well)

 

Other tunes I play:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqN1JfXKhAU

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYjBJ5BKNds&feature=related

 

 

A way easier eeeeeh!

 

Tunes I would like to play:

 

 

 

 

And I'm glad you liked the tune Marien!

 

If anyone plays something basque please let me know!

 

Agur!

 

Fernando

Edited by fernando
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And nobody knows the origin of the basque. When these people talk I don't understand a single word. Sometimes I can understand Galician, or Catalan. Because it can be similar to Spanish, they must share the same origin or something. But when a basque talks Euskera (that's the name of the language), I don't understand anything. Well, I understand their music! :D

 

Fernando

 

Spanish - or Castilian, for to be more precise - Galician and Catalonian share the same origin from latin. Nobody could tell were the Euskera came from, so traditionally they put it with finnish and hungarian in the 'odd languajes drawer'.:P

 

But not too many years ago were discovered some clay pieces in an archeological digging & they discovered they were iberian - pre roman writing - and translated them. It seems that is very close to euskera. So, would be a fine irony if it was the most spanish of all lenguajes - if you know the basque country issue -.

 

The 'trikitixa' word is not totally accurate. The real name for the instrument is 'akordeoiak', and it's a D/G or C/F melodeon with 12 unisonoric basses. The fact - ver few known, and often mistaken - is that 'trikitixa' is the ensmble of melodeon and tambourine.

 

Very good tune, Fer. Not too bad for an english ;)

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Nice info on the language, so not Iberian Celts then.

 

I should have noticed the thumb loops but the playing was so lively I assumed it had to be an Anglo!;)

 

Very nice Michael! I'm happy to hear that!

 

And Fernando, thanks for the information about the basque diatonic accordion, I wanted to know the notes they are tuned, because I can see that they are always playing different keys from the Irish

 

Fernando

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