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Norman?Morse? Edgely?Tedrow?

  

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Andrew Norman will know. Why not ask him?

 

A.C. Norman & Co.

"Paddock", Rowton

Halfway House

Shrewsbury

Shropshire

SY5 9EL

Phone 01743 884583

 

andrew_acnorman_co_uk.gif

 

Chris

 

Edited to add image of email address. All info from the FAQ. Oh, and I have to say I think the poll unhelpful. These makers all have their strengths and weaknesses (for instance, Morse are incredibly light, which is why I have one for playing for morris, but OTOH customisation is virtually non-existent). The poll is too simplistic to reflect this. Neither is it complete. What about Herrington, Wakker and the others?

Edited by Chris Timson

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For most with only so much money to spend, this is like asking a Dell computer user what he thinks of Compaq, Advent, HP and Packard.

 

That said, I'm sure there are members here that have played all and have the knowledge to give unbiased comparative assessment.

 

Unfortunately I'm not one of them.

 

Simon

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I've played all of them except Edgeley, and I can add to that Herrington from the modern mid range makers. As I said at the beginning "these makers all have their strengths and weaknesses". I will add they all make pretty good concertinas and are nice people to boot. Beyond that I am not going to tell anyone who is "best". I don't think there's any such beast.

 

PS Today be International Talk Like a Pirate day, me hearties so it be, and it be the Black Spot for 'eee, zipper12, and I'm away with me wench for some grog, aaargh!

Edited by Chris Timson

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I've played all of them except Edgeley, and I can add to that Herrington from the modern mid range makers. As I said at the beginning "these makers all have their strengths and weaknesses". I will add they all make pretty good concertinas and are nice people to boot. Beyond that I am not going to tell anyone who is "best". I don't think there's any such beast.

 

PS Today be International Talk Like a Pirate day, me hearties so it be, and it be the Black Spot for 'eee, zipper12, and I'm away with me wench for some grog, aaargh!

 

 

I play and own an Edgley and a Herrington. Each has different characteristics. Like them both very much. Haven't played the others.

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I've played all of them except Edgeley, and I can add to that Herrington from the modern mid range makers. As I said at the beginning "these makers all have their strengths and weaknesses". I will add they all make pretty good concertinas and are nice people to boot. Beyond that I am not going to tell anyone who is "best". I don't think there's any such beast.

 

PS Today be International Talk Like a Pirate day, me hearties so it be, and it be the Black Spot for 'eee, zipper12, and I'm away with me wench for some grog, aaargh!

 

 

I play and own an Edgley and a Herrington. Each has different characteristics. Like them both very much. Haven't played the others.

 

This thread could be about a thousand times more interesting and informative if anyone would bother to specify *which* different characteristics.

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This thread could be about a thousand times more interesting and informative if anyone would bother to specify *which* different characteristics.

It's not whether we can or can not be bothered, it's too big a job for a thread. These concertinas deserve detailed reviews, not flip characterisations (I rather regret the description of the Morse I put in my first reply as being too glib). Like so much in the concertina world no-one can give you checklists you can work through that will result in an obvious "best buy" for you. Life would be a lot simpler (but a lot less fun) if it were possible, but there it is.

 

Chris

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This thread could be about a thousand times more interesting and informative if anyone would bother to specify *which* different characteristics.

It's not whether we can or can not be bothered, it's too big a job for a thread.

It's also very subjective. I really like the Morse offerings but when I pick up a Norman it just feels "right." Were I to list the characteristics of both I think the Morse would win, purely for the reason that I play for a Morris side and the lightness of the Morse would swing it, but when I try the two side by side there's no competition - for me the Norman wins every time.

 

As said before, anybody buying any of these makes is likely to be very satisfied but at the end of the day the only way to really find the one that best suits you is to try them.

Edited by Woody

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This thread could be about a thousand times more interesting and informative if anyone would bother to specify *which* different characteristics.

It's not whether we can or can not be bothered, it's too big a job for a thread. These concertinas deserve detailed reviews, not flip characterisations (I rather regret the description of the Morse I put in my first reply as being too glib). Like so much in the concertina world no-one can give you checklists you can work through that will result in an obvious "best buy" for you. Life would be a lot simpler (but a lot less fun) if it were possible, but there it is.

 

Too big for a thread?? Trust me, they're quite elastic. They will hold more than you give them credit for. Again, I think it comes down to the fact that no one will bother themselves to type it out. Are you suggesting that if everyone suddenly typed out a detailed review of their concertinas, that it would be too big for anyone to read? Let me assure you that this is not the case. In fact, that is a thread that I would read twice, be it ever so long.

 

I don't know how it is over there in England, but let me tell you how it is here in Utah: the state is over one-and-a-half times the size of England (six times the size of Ireland), and contains (as nearly as I can determine) four concertina players: two English, and two Anglo. I count myself as one of the English players, and offer my gratitude to Steven for letting me play his 1916 Wheatstone extended-treble (refurbished by Dipper) for a minute. Now if I want to see another concertina "in the wild", I have to go at least as far as Las Vegas to even stand a chance. I have no other business in Las Vegas, and no guarantee of finding a concertina after spending six hours on the highway to get there.

 

Comparative information on concertinas of different makes is something I thirst for. I'm not asking for a glib checklist; I'm asking for anything at all. Anything-- everything! Please tell me!

 

I understand that the original post seemed to expect a glib answer, and didn't do a very good job of asking for details, but I would really like them. Eh, maybe I just need to start a new thread. Not looking for a midrange anglo anyway... =)

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Ransom, I feel your pain -- I lived in New Mexico for four years. The nearest concertina players (that I could ever find) were 6-9 hours (one way) away.

 

I have an Edgley. When I was looking at buying a new concertina, I narrowed it down to the Edgley 24-button special anglo and a Tedrow 30-button anglo. I like the sound of both (based solely on listening to sound clips from their websites), the prices were pretty close to each other (this was in 2004), and both would work just fine for what I wanted -- session playing and possible eventual morris/contra/song accompaniment.

 

In the end I chose the Edgely solely because I have small hands -- even for a female -- and I felt the Edgley 24-button would be better suited to my short fingers. That third row is a bit of an uncomfortable stretch sometimes. I am happy with my choice.

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In the end I chose the Edgely solely because I have small hands -- even for a female -- and I felt the Edgley 24-button would be better suited to my short fingers. That third row is a bit of an uncomfortable stretch sometimes. I am happy with my choice.

Indeed, this is another reason why an actual answer to the question of which is "better", or even better in a particular parameter, is (IMO) too much to hope for. Such judgements depend on the individual player more often than not. E.g.,

  • Are the hand bars comfortably placed? Probably depends on the lengths of your fingers, size of your hands (both length and width of your palms), maybe other details.
  • What about the air button? Different folks' thumbs differ in length and flexibility.
  • Responsiveness of the reeds? May depend on your playing style. Comparing two instruments, one may have better response at low volume, the other better a high volume. It may also depend on the dynamic with which you apply pressure. And there could well be a difference in response between playing individual notes and playing several at once (e.g., chords).
  • And what one person considers a "too stiff" bellows, another may feel is just right, while the second may feel that the first's preferred bellows is "too floppy".

Which is not to say that this thread is useless. Anecdotes are better than a vacuum, especially if those telling them give enough personal details of how they made their judgements. It's just important for the person taking those anecdotes as a guide to remember that they are nothing more; they are not promises.

 

Besides, you'll never know unless and until you yourself get a chance to try each and every one of the candidates. That's probably the biggest hurdle, also for those providing the anecdotes. Even among those who have had the opportunity to try several instruments by different makers, most have only done so for a few minutes on instruments not their own... at Noel Hill classes, the Catskill weekend, NESI, Witney, Kilve, etc. (Oh, I mustn't forget Morris ales!)

 

The "good" news, though, is that if you're unable to get to one of those events where there's the opportunity to try several different makes in order to try before you buy, then you'll probably face the same difficulty after your purchase. (Buying a concertina doesn't normally increase the funds available for travel to concertina-related events. :() So it will likely be a while before you'll be able to compare your own concertina with other makes, and you'll be happy playing what you have. As several have said, none of the above-mentioned makes will disappoint you.

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Comparative information on concertinas of different makes is something I thirst for. I'm not asking for a glib checklist; I'm asking for anything at all. Anything-- everything! Please tell me!

Well if you go to www.concertina.info/tina.faq/conc-ap2.htm you will find my reviews on my Morse, Herrington and Dipper concertinas. Have a look at the rest of the FAQ while you're there.

 

Cheers,

 

Chris

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I think full reviews are hard, and perhaps not very helpful. That is because all the concertinas on the market which are hand made are all very good. I know people that have very strong preferences for the hybrids, but personally I think they all have something to offer. Also, I think it is all a matter of what you are looking for. Personally, I believe that location is a huge factor, one that is often overlooked (especially if you don't have the chace to try out multiple makers.

 

Beyond that, preferences are very individualistic I met someone once who wanted to order a concertina, and their only criteria were that they could get ONE extra button on the left side (I thought this was unreasonable and so did most of the top makers), and they did not want a Wheatstone end pattern, but a Jeffries. I tried to discuss quality of reeds, mechanism, etc., and they would have none of it. The stupid thing was the button they wanted was totally unnecessary! I could appreciate wanting more buttons, but one single extra button does not offer anything. He did find someone willing to do the extra button.

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