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New Bandoneon and Concertina Layout.


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Here are some links to information about a new kind of bandoneon, called Atzarin Bandonion, which may be of interest to people who play Anglo concertina or a duet system concertina.

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbeEmJNTR45DXESw5dT-sPQ?spfreload=10

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_bandoneon_reshaped.html

The 3 row layout was originally intended for the treble keyboard of a bisonoric accordion, but it has since been developed on a new kind of bandoneon, specifically designed for this kind of layout.

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/keyboards/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_layout.html

 

Although the best embodiment of this layout is the bandonion format described on the Atzarin web page, I feel that a smaller version could be applied to concertinas. It would be very intersesting to have people who play different types of concertina give their opinion on the layout, particularly bearing in mind the lengthy discussions in other threads on this forum about Duet systems and the possibility of a Wicki/Hayden bandoneon.

The idea was to have a completely regular, fully chromatic instrument in both directions of the bellows, that would be neutral or isomorphic. So, the shape of a triad chord is one and the same in any musical key. The same is true of any minor triad chord. 1 scale pattern suffices to play that type of scale in 8 different musical keys, 4 on the draw and 4 on the push. A different scale pattern is needed in the opposite direction of the bellows. In total you only need 3 different scale patterns to play in any key in either direction of the bellows.

Transposing is much easier as a tune can be played in a different key with exactly the same fingering and bellows reversals just by starting from a different button in the same row. Musical keys fall into 3 groups of 4, depending on which row the tonic note is on. Transposing to a key from another group is made easier by the fact that very often, motiffs and entire phrase can have the same fingering, but played in the opposite direction of the bellows.

Another important consideration was that the fingering style should be comfortable and not completely alien to people coming from conventional diatonic or bisonoric accordions or even Anglo concertinas. Although different, playing technique may feel more familiar to people who play on diatonic accordions with rows separated by quarts than to people who play Irish B/C etc.

Although the Atzarin layout requires learning a completely new system, transition is fairly quick and easy. Learning is very rewarding because the layout is 100% regular, so there is less memorisation of chord shapes, scale patterns etc.

What should be the definitive bandoneon prototype is currently being built by bandoneon and concertina manufacturer Harry Geuns. The bandoneon model will have traditional style long, zinc reedplates and two voice (MH) bandoneon octave tuning. However, if there is enough genuine interest a dry tremolo tuned (MM) model can be built.

Edited by Atzarin
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i will say as someone who started playing and fell in love with the anglo concertina for traditional irish music about five years ago, that its lack of full chromaticism in both directions is beginning to absolutely infuriate me. i'm starting to find it really disappointing and limiting from an expressive standpoint. i still love the instrument in the keys which do have all notes in both directions, but not being able to play irish tunes in all keys with equal fluidity and suppleness, and equal range of expressive options available to me as the player in terms of phrasing a passage all in one direction or breaking it up and switching directions depending on the effect i want, like you have in the keys which indeed are chromatic in both directions, is starting to feel very stilted and confining.....i'm actually teaching myself CBA right now using a small, combact CBA with thirty treble notes (four rows) and two octaves of freebass notes on the bass side for this very reason....it's the size of an irish button accordion, but you can play it in any key brilliantly. the very small freebass side is more than enough for the super-light, minimal double-stops or light chording used in irish accordion bass arrangements (tasteful ones, that is, not the heavy-handed PA bass blitz....)

Edited by ceemonster
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i will say as someone who started playing and fell in love with the anglo concertina for traditional irish music about five years ago, that its lack of full chromaticism in both directions is beginning to absolutely infuriate me. i'm starting to find it really disappointing and limiting from an expressive standpoint. i still love the instrument in the keys which do have all notes in both directions, but not being able to play irish tunes in all keys with equal fluidity and suppleness, and equal range of expressive options available to me as the player in terms of phrasing a passage all in one direction or breaking it up and switching directions depending on the effect i want, like you have in the keys which indeed are chromatic in both directions, is starting to feel very stilted and confining.....i'm actually teaching myself CBA right now using a small, combact CBA with thirty treble notes (four rows) and two octaves of freebass notes on the bass side for this very reason....it's the size of an irish button accordion, but you can play it in any key brilliantly. the very small freebass side is more than enough for the super-light, minimal double-stops or light chording used in irish accordion bass arrangements (tasteful ones, that is, not the heavy-handed PA bass blitz....)

May I ask where you found such an instrument?

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Here is a link to a new three row layout, called Atzarin, which may be of interest to people who play Anglo concertina or a duet system concertina.

 

http://atzarin.com/e...ion_layout.html

 

 

Immediately I see a problem with very long row. It's horizontally oriented and requires free hand. A Traditional Bandoneon makes use of fixed wrist that provides force and stability. In your case wrists must slide up and down. Such hybrid exists already, it's Habla Bandoneon, built and played very well. Such layout requires instrument to be unisonoric, as necessary wrist slides may happen on the push and it is compromised by pressing of sticky hand against instrument's side. So you also need to design a wrist strap that is easily sliding up/down. Such swivel has been designed and used on some old accordions, but is prone to sticking and adds to overall cost and complexity/weight. However, with modern technology and materials it probably can be designed better.

Edited by m3838
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[May I ask where you found such an instrument?]

 

 

http://www.akkordeoncentrum.de/shop/001432,details_Borsini_Prelude_Mini___K%3Eauch_in_K%C3%B6ln_erh%C3%A4ltlich.html

 

The price went up a bit in 2010; i bought mine in 2009. There is a discount price posted, plus I am U.S. so they subtracted VAT, so mine was a good bit under 1,000 euro. Like, 700-something, I think. However, you did then have to add the exchange rate soaking and the shipping soaking (and from Germany, it is horrible), but it was substantially less than a new saltarelle bouebe from a U.S. dealer like Button Box (and way, WAY less than a bouebe from a euro dealer).

 

note that it is one sole M reed on treble side, one sole M reed on bass side.

mine is now at my local accordion wizard's shop, where the treble side is being outfitted with a double set of handmade middle reeds, so the treble side will be two voices, an MM, tuned to about 5.5 cents of tremolo to make it full and round.

 

bass side is fine with single middle reed. i got this box mainly to use for irish music, and i only need spare basses, enough for double stops, single drones, and light third-less chords.

 

i also have a very compact CBA a tad wider and longer this but with a conventional 60-bass stradella arrangement on the left side, and i think four rows with 34 notes on the right. it's little bigger than this one, and it's great for musette, tango, everything. but i wanted to get the smallest one i could get as a stealth irish box.

 

i LOVE my little borsini. the single-reed setting actually sounded really beautiful. it was factory reeds, but i thought they were good. however, i wanted a two-voice on the right side.....the sorcerer and the sorcerer's apprentice at the shop are having a grand old time figuring out how to get the second set of reeds in there....

Edited by ceemonster
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[May I ask where you found such an instrument?]

 

 

http://www.akkordeoncentrum.de/shop/001432,details_Borsini_Prelude_Mini___K%3Eauch_in_K%C3%B6ln_erh%C3%A4ltlich.html

 

The price went up a bit in 2010; i bought mine in 2009. There is a discount price posted, plus I am U.S. so they subtracted VAT, so mine was a good bit under 1,000 euro. Like, 700-something, I think. However, you did then have to add the exchange rate soaking and the shipping soaking (and from Germany, it is horrible), but it was substantially less than a new saltarelle bouebe from a U.S. dealer like Button Box (and way, WAY less than a bouebe from a euro dealer).

 

note that it is one sole M reed on treble side, one sole M reed on bass side.

mine is now at my local accordion wizard's shop, where the treble side is being outfitted with a double set of handmade middle reeds, so the treble side will be two voices, an MM, tuned to about 5.5 cents of tremolo to make it full and round.

 

bass side is fine with single middle reed. i got this box mainly to use for irish music, and i only need spare basses, enough for double stops, single drones, and light third-less chords.

 

i also have a very compact CBA a tad wider and longer this but with a conventional 60-bass stradella arrangement on the left side, and i think four rows with 34 notes on the right. it's little bigger than this one, and it's great for musette, tango, everything. but i wanted to get the smallest one i could get as a stealth irish box.

 

i LOVE my little borsini. the single-reed setting actually sounded really beautiful. it was factory reeds, but i thought they were good. however, i wanted a two-voice on the right side.....the sorcerer and the sorcerer's apprentice at the shop are having a grand old time figuring out how to get the second set of reeds in there....

 

weltmeister also makes one, a three-row version and a four-row version (same number of notes, just a repeating fourth row)

 

http://www.thomann.de/gb/weltmeister_fbk_26_freebass_akkordeon.htm

http://www.thomann.de/ie/weltmeister_fbk_35_freebass_akkordeon.htm

 

there are also a couple of higher-end ones by some of the italian makers, might even be on that akkordeoncentrum site.

 

a model that has gotten a bit of play here and there is the Pigini Peter Pan--same compact size, same thing, one dry middle reed on each side, but the Peter Pan is a heavier "converter" box whose bass side converts from stradella to free-bass and back. for irish, i don't need that. i only wanted to do this caper if my local wizard said he could outfit the treble side with double MM handmades, and i got the green light, so.....

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Thanks for the responses. As I'm new to forums and not yet fully sure of how they work my replies may be presented rather oddly! Sorry. Very grateful for all answers. I wanted to comment on one in particular:

 

Here is a link to a new three row layout, called Atzarin, which may be of interest to people who play Anglo concertina or a duet system concertina.

 

http://atzarin.com/e...ion_layout.html

 

 

Immediately I see a problem with very long row. It's horizontally oriented and requires free hand. A Traditional Bandoneon makes use of fixed wrist that provides force and stability. In your case wrists must slide up and down. Such hybrid exists already, it's Habla Bandoneon, built and played very well. Such layout requires instrument to be unisonoric, as necessary wrist slides may happen on the push and it is compromised by pressing of sticky hand against instrument's side. So you also need to design a wrist strap that is easily sliding up/down. Such swivel has been designed and used on some old accordions, but is prone to sticking and adds to overall cost and complexity/weight. However, with modern technology and materials it probably can be designed better.

 

This question is dealt with, in part, on the Atzarin website at:

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_control_and_stability.html'>http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_control_and_stability.html

 

In short, the need to slide the hand is reduced because of the curved rows and the position of the buttons. On the Gabla or hybrid model, the position of the buttons in straight rows at the front of the instrument requires a much bigger slide to reach buttons near either end of any row than when they are positioned on the ends in curves, which allows for rotation of the hand. Front positioned buttons means that the fingers are fully curved and consequently cannot acheive the same spread as when the fingers are only slightly bent as when you drum them on the table top, for example.

 

I say above that the question of the need to slide and the design of the hand rail and strap is dealt with only in part because exact details of the new kind of hand rail are not disclosed.

I do not wish to show any diagram of the proposed new hand rail, until it has been finished and fully tested. Please bear in mind that the new prototype, which I expect not to need any further modification, is currently being finished by Harry Geuns. The proposed solution is a differently shaped hand rail and a slighlty different position of the strap, as mentioned on the web page linked above. The hand rail will be flat, but have a curved shape following the curve of the rows of buttons, so that the front edge of the rail is 7.5cm from the centre of each button on the first row. I have tested this to some extent on the current prototype (now undergoing modifaction) and found it to be satisfactory.

 

In case it were not satisfactory I have come up with another possible solution that would permit swivel and slide, but it would be a very radical departure from anything bandoneon like or concertina like. However, I don't think it will be neccessary.

 

When comparing the Atzarin bandonion and the Gabla or hybrid bandonion, which both require sliding the hand in playing technique, it is also important to bear in mind the differet ways in which the instrument is gripped in each case and the position of the hand strap, as I feel that the Atzarin model allows greater stability and control than the Gabla hybrid. Please refer to the web page:

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_control_and_stability.html

 

Once again, thank you for the comments, whether encouraging or constructively critical! My original intention was to get feedback on the actual layout itself, but any comments on any aspect of the project would be extremely useful and very welcome.

Edited by Atzarin
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It would be very intersesting to have people who play different types of concertina give their opinion on the layout, particularly bearing in mind the lengthy discussions in other threads on this forum about Duet systems and the possibility of a Wicki/Hayden bandoneon.
Among concertinas, I play chemnitzer and bandoneon; outside the concertina realm: Russian diatonic accordion, piano, guitars, Cümbüş, Kanklės, etc...

 

I went through the mental exercise several years ago of creating a more uniform bi-sonoric layout. (I also corresponded a bit with Hugh Blake, who created "The Blake System" to this same end). I came to the conclusion then that isomorphism is highly overrated, especially in a bi-sonoric instrument. (I also think 12-tone equal temperament is highly overrated, but that's a different story.)

 

Anyway, on to the Atzarin layout:

 

First, I had trouble with the web site. It disables scrollbars and will not fit on my (1440 × 900 pixel) screen. I could see enough to get the idea.

 

I do like that way diatonic scales lay out so that you could easily play with two alternating fingers for most of the octave.

 

But, I don't like the way the left hand has the high notes at the left end rather than the right. Very accordiony.

 

I do like that you chose to place a semitone difference between press and draw.

 

But, I think you did it backwards: Draw should be a semitone below press. I guess it's a leading-tone-to-tonic thing in my mind and tonic should be on press.

 

Though I don't think I would want to play an instrument in this layout, I'd be interested to see what kind of playing (ornament and phrasing in particular) grow out of it.

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[i had trouble with the web site. It disables scrollbars and will not fit] yeah, same with me, except i had no luck whatsoever making it work. total waste of time. thanks to this, i remain clueless as to the specifics of this system.

 

i think enterprises like this are great. from what little i could make out of it not sure if the layout or the revised playing ergonomics would be for, me, though again, the whole site is unusable to me are present. but great idea. probably i will suck it up and learn the traditional bando system at some point. problem is, cba is so easy and sounds so ravishing for tango (admittedly, not like a bando, but close enough and gorgeous enough that i'm not sure it matters at the end of the day) that i don't know when i'll get around to bando....

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Many thanks for the comments!

 

 

I went through the mental exercise several years ago of creating a more uniform bi-sonoric layout. (I also corresponded a bit with Hugh Blake, who created "The Blake System" to this same end). I came to the conclusion then that isomorphism is highly overrated, especially in a bi-sonoric instrument. (I also think 12-tone equal temperament is highly overrated, but that's a different story.)

 

 

I came across the Blake System a couple of years after deciding to go ahead with Atzarin and actually quite liked it. The thing I didn't like about it was the "depth" of the keyboard, 6 rows if I remember rightly, and how this might need the hand to be moved back and forth slightly or the fingers to be bent a lot, possibly resulting in discomfort in the hand depending on the type of strap. I cannot recall whether it made use of a hand strap, as on a bandoneon or a wrist strap, like on the left hand of an accordion or on a hybrid bandonion. Correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think any were commercially produced either.

 

Another system I really like is the Hugo Stark Chromatiphon layout. I came across it on the internet after a few years of "mental exercise", scribbling out layouts on every other page of diaries etc, when I realised that there was a fair amount of information available on the web. It is the only layout that tempted me to give up in my moments of despair in the search for a system that convinced me and I very nearly bought a second hand from a dealer in Germany. As with the Blake System a few years later, the problem I had with it was the "depth" of the keyboard as well as the distance between whole tones.

 

The years of frustrating arranging and rearranging of notes, in my mind, on paper and on my accordion, in search of a more uniform bisonoric system similarly led me to believe that isomorphism is overrated, particularly in small instruments. However, although overrated, I do feel that it has some advantages even when the isomorphism is not 100%, due to wrap around edge effects etc. Bisonority can help to reduce the impact of edge effects.

 

As for 12 tone equal temperament, I cannot really give an opinion as my aim was to create a layout that was easier to learn and more versatile than my diatonic accordion layout, but using mainstream technology and tuning. Beacause of my passion for dancing Argentinian tango I came across bandoneon and came to think that the bandoneon format has several advantages over the accordion.

 

 

Anyway, on to the Atzarin layout:

 

First, I had trouble with the web site. It disables scrollbars and will not fit on my (1440 × 900 pixel) screen. I could see enough to get the idea.

 

I do like that way diatonic scales lay out so that you could easily play with two alternating fingers for most of the octave.

 

But, I don't like the way the left hand has the high notes at the left end rather than the right. Very accordiony.

 

I do like that you chose to place a semitone difference between press and draw.

 

But, I think you did it backwards: Draw should be a semitone below press. I guess it's a leading-tone-to-tonic thing in my mind and tonic should be on press.

 

Though I don't think I would want to play an instrument in this layout, I'd be interested to see what kind of playing (ornament and phrasing in particular) grow out of it.

 

I'm rather surprised you had trouble viewing the web site on your 1440 x 900 pixel screen. The body of the web pages is 1024 x 768 so it should fit no problem. In any case, in view of your and Ceemonster's comments I have enabled scrolling as a solution for the time being.

 

The left hand mirrors the right in that the same patterns and shapes are played with the same fingering on both hands, simply because to my mind and fingers it seems and feels easier. Bear in mind that in order to play the very broadly voiced chords that are typical of the traditional bandoneon, on the Atzarin layout the use of the thumb is essential.

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_broad_chords.html

 

Originally, coming from diatonic accordion, I designed the layout to be played with just 4 fingers. However, becoming aware of bandoneon voicings and seeing some amazing CBA technique on Youtube led me to start using the thumb and design a new hand rail and strap set up that would allow the use of the thumb whilst still enabling a firm grip on the instrument, as I mentioned in a previous post.

 

Specifically referring to the left hand, using the thumb to play the fundamental the rest of the fingers can easily and comfortably move well away from the thumb to play much higher notes, either melody or chordal additions. In another thread on this forum there has been some debate in relation to the Wicki/Hayden as to whether the layout should run from "left to right" / "bottom to top" or from "right to left" / "top to bottom". In favour of "bottom to top" the argument held that the little finger (pinky) could be used to play the highest note whilst using the other fingers for the rest of the chord or even to add melody etc. However, even when only using 4 fingers to play, it is much easier to separate the index finger (pointer) with a greater spread from the other three fingers than the little finger from the others.

 

On an Atarin layout, with the notes on the left hand running from "top to bottom" it is very easy to play a low note and add 2 or 3 notes on top from the next octave up. This is particularly comfortable on curved rows, less so on stright rows, as mentioned on the page linked above.

 

As for the semitone tone difference at each button and whether the higher note should be on the draw or the press, both are contemplated, but for production of a real instrument I had to choose one. My intention was to have a layout that was easier to learn and more versatile than the diatonic accordion layout. However, it had to be something that was relatively easy to "migrate" to. The most important thing for me was the fingering. I was coming from Trikitixa, the Basque diatonic accordion, where playing across the rows is normal. In fact, the idea of playing on the row is quiet strange from Trikitixa technique's perspective, as the two rows are seen as one unit, not two separate elements that complement each other. When experimenting I found that having the higher note on the draw allowed a finger style that was more similar to that used on the Trikitixa. However, at that time I was also thinking along the lines of "tonic on the push", as on the Trikitixa, whereas now I do not feel that's the best way to play. On Demian's original accordion, if I'm not mistaken, and on other early bisonoric instrument, the tonic note was on the draw.

 

In any case, I feel that the fact that the Atzarin layout gives you the choice of tonic on the push or draw or both is one of its main strengths.

Edited by Atzarin
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  • 4 months later...

Some photos of the unfinished Atzarin bandonion prototype can now be seen on the Atzarin website. Although the work is incomplete, the photos give a very good idea of what the instrument actually looks like. Most pages with photos have a photo at the top of the page and at the botton, so make sure you scroll down if you want to see all the photos. Links to pages with photos:

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_development_stage_3.html

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_control_and_stability.html

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_button_arcs.html

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_button_arcs_dimensions.html

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_development_stage_2.html

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  • 3 weeks later...

Some photos of the unfinished Atzarin bandonion prototype can now be seen on the Atzarin website. The photos clearly show the shape of the new button arcs and hand rail and the shape and position of the air valve lever which is to be tested on the instrument over the next few weeks.

 

atzarin_bandonion_stage_3_right.jpg

 

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/instruments.html

 

By the way, Michael, I'll be in the UK with the Atzarin bandonion prototype at the end of April, first in South London and later in Ipswich, so we could arrange to meet if you're interested in having a go on it!

 

Sebastian

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  • 1 year later...

Back in January 2011 I posted some links to information about the Atzarin Bandonion. In spite of it not being possible to bring out the new prototype in the time desired, development and improvement have moved ahead. Information about this work and development towards an optimum Atzarin bandoenon is available at:

 

Stage 4 - Improvements in grip and stability.

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_development_stage_4.html

 

Stage 5 _ Current development for optimum Atzarin Bandonion

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_development_stage_5.html

 

Recent photos in the following links may be of particular interest to people who are skeptical about using the thumb to play notes and/or doubtful about the grip and control on the instrument:

 

Playing broadly voiced chords

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_broad_chords.html

 

Atzarin bandonion comfort and playability

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_comfort_playability.html

 

There are also recent photos in the following updated pages:

 

Atzarin bandonion overview

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_bandoneon_reshaped.html

 

Atzarin bandonion hold and stability

http://atzarin.com/eng/instruments/bandonion/atzarin_bandonion_control_and_stability.html

 

Regards,

 

Sebastian Brown Apraiz

www.atzarin.com

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i will say as someone who started playing and fell in love with the anglo concertina for traditional irish music about five years ago, that its lack of full chromaticism in both directions is beginning to absolutely infuriate me. i'm starting to find it really disappointing and limiting from an expressive standpoint. i still love the instrument in the keys which do have all notes in both directions, but not being able to play irish tunes in all keys with equal fluidity and suppleness, and equal range of expressive options available to me as the player in terms of phrasing a passage all in one direction or breaking it up and switching directions depending on the effect i want, like you have in the keys which indeed are chromatic in both directions, is starting to feel very stilted and confining.....i'm actually teaching myself CBA right now using a small, combact CBA with thirty treble notes (four rows) and two octaves of freebass notes on the bass side for this very reason....it's the size of an irish button accordion, but you can play it in any key brilliantly. the very small freebass side is more than enough for the super-light, minimal double-stops or light chording used in irish accordion bass arrangements (tasteful ones, that is, not the heavy-handed PA bass blitz....)

 

I find myself thinking " if only I had a x button" a lot.

 

I had an interesting discussion with one of the top names in Irish concertina at Willie Clancy. He said he recently converted from 38key to 30key after many years because the difficulties inherent in playing the 30key create the Irish concertina style and he had found himself sounding too chromatically smooth on the 38key. If I had had more time with him I would have asked for specific examples.

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]I had an interesting discussion with one of the top names in Irish concertina at Willie Clancy. He said he recently converted from 38key to 30key after many years because the difficulties inherent in playing the 30key create the Irish concertina style and he had found himself sounding too chromatically smooth on the 38key.]

 

i have a guess or two as to who that might be... :P i'm thinking of someone who is known as an authority on the "across-the-rows" style but who, if you watch them play, holds the bellows out and plays lots of back-and-forth, and indeed gets a very one-row-ish feeling of movement and lift that way.

 

i personally love the fluid sound, that is, the fluid end of the meadow you have discretion to graze in unless you go past the outer fencepost and get so smooth you're past even the smooth end of the ITM spectrum for articulation and phrasing.

 

it's a very odd and funny thing---

 

no one knocks the "long-bow", fluid and smooth fiddlers for not sawstroking a lot in the more kerry-ish style.

 

and nobody knocks the traveler pipers for being fluid, smooth, and "open" as opposed to the staccato and "closed" articulation choice.

 

and nobody knocks the flowing, smooth east-galway-ish flute style of paddy carty or clare's peadar o'loughlin for not being huffy-puffier.

 

but goshdarnit, free-reed players are flogged if they don't sound "back-and-forth" like a one-row. i'm rebelling against this. i like to articulate and phrase both concertina and box like the east galway flute players or the "long-bow" slurry style. i'm worried about not passing the fencepost into a realm of smoothness that's not ITM, but i could care less whether i sound like a one-row. concertinas have 30 buttons (or 39) precisely so you can be like the fiddlers, and choose how you want your articulation/phrasing style to be, within those parameter fenceposts!

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