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A question for those who are in the know concertina-wise. I purchased a new Morse Anglo in G/D a month and a half ago. I have played it about an hour daily since then. While at a fiddle festival last week I was practicing in the afternoon of a very hot and humid day. The sound seemed thinner than usual and then one reed suddenly didn't sound but just a tiny bit. (B above high G) Afraid that I had ruined my new pride and joy I put her away immediately rather than forcing any more air through her and possibly damaging something. The following day was cooler and drier so I tried each button (Push and Draw) very gingerly to see if everything was all right. Then I played it a bit louder for a few tunes. To my surprise the Morse now had a pleasant low end 'growl' and some very deep overtones. It has continued to this day. I swear that I am not imagining it but wish I had an earlier recording of it to compare against how she sounds now. My question - (Finally!) Do concertinas 'play in' similar to violins and guitars over time and sound a bit looser and warmer? I honestly believe that it sounds and plays better now than it did before. Then again, I am new to Anglos and my technique could be improving without me being conscious of it. (Prior to this I played diatonic accordions and Chemnitzers.) I have played her hard since and don't seem to find anything wrong with it at all. I just think it suddenly sounds better. Am I daft? Dave

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A question for those who are in the know concertina-wise. I purchased a new Morse Anglo in G/D a month and a half ago. I have played it about an hour daily since then. While at a fiddle festival last week I was practicing in the afternoon of a very hot and humid day. The sound seemed thinner than usual and then one reed suddenly didn't sound but just a tiny bit. (B above high G) Afraid that I had ruined my new pride and joy I put her away immediately rather than forcing any more air through her and possibly damaging something. The following day was cooler and drier so I tried each button (Push and Draw) very gingerly to see if everything was all right. Then I played it a bit louder for a few tunes. To my surprise the Morse now had a pleasant low end 'growl' and some very deep overtones. It has continued to this day. I swear that I am not imagining it but wish I had an earlier recording of it to compare against how she sounds now. My question - (Finally!) Do concertinas 'play in' similar to violins and guitars over time and sound a bit looser and warmer? I honestly believe that it sounds and plays better now than it did before. Then again, I am new to Anglos and my technique could be improving without me being conscious of it. (Prior to this I played diatonic accordions and Chemnitzers.) I have played her hard since and don't seem to find anything wrong with it at all. I just think it suddenly sounds better. Am I daft? Dave

 

My Morse G/D initially had some slight "buzzes" and "gurgles" in the lower notes. They disappeared after a few weeks' playing.

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A question for those who are in the know concertina-wise. I purchased a new Morse Anglo in G/D a month and a half ago. I have played it about an hour daily since then. While at a fiddle festival last week I was practicing in the afternoon of a very hot and humid day. The sound seemed thinner than usual and then one reed suddenly didn't sound but just a tiny bit. (B above high G) Afraid that I had ruined my new pride and joy I put her away immediately rather than forcing any more air through her and possibly damaging something. The following day was cooler and drier so I tried each button (Push and Draw) very gingerly to see if everything was all right. Then I played it a bit louder for a few tunes. To my surprise the Morse now had a pleasant low end 'growl' and some very deep overtones. It has continued to this day. I swear that I am not imagining it but wish I had an earlier recording of it to compare against how she sounds now. My question - (Finally!) Do concertinas 'play in' similar to violins and guitars over time and sound a bit looser and warmer? I honestly believe that it sounds and plays better now than it did before. Then again, I am new to Anglos and my technique could be improving without me being conscious of it. (Prior to this I played diatonic accordions and Chemnitzers.) I have played her hard since and don't seem to find anything wrong with it at all. I just think it suddenly sounds better. Am I daft? Dave

 

Could hot air expand reeds more than reed shoes so tongues started to touch the slot walls? Or that the wooden walls swelled and compressed the brass shoes, narrowing the slots? Could it be that reed tongues beating against the slot sides shifted to more central positions and now are set better? But I guarantee that good 80% of the differences in sound are heard only by you.

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Could hot air expand reeds more than reed shoes so tongues started to touch the slot walls? Or that the wooden walls swelled and compressed the brass shoes, narrowing the slots? Could it be that reed tongues beating against the slot sides shifted to more central positions and now are set better? But I guarantee that good 80% of the differences in sound are heard only by you.

 

 

 

Not in this case. The Morse uses accordion reeds.

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The people who know more about this than anyone, I'm sure, are Doug Creighton and Bob Snope at the BBox shop. Why not call them? They'll tell you what others have reported, and I can verify they will fix anything that is wrong if you can't or if it doesn't fix itself. You even go to the head of their usually long repair line!

 

Ken

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Could hot air expand reeds more than reed shoes so tongues started to touch the slot walls? Or that the wooden walls swelled and compressed the brass shoes, narrowing the slots? Could it be that reed tongues beating against the slot sides shifted to more central positions and now are set better? But I guarantee that good 80% of the differences in sound are heard only by you.

 

 

 

Not in this case. The Morse uses accordion reeds.

 

Aluminum also expands. If it expands more than steel, the gaps will widen and sound thin and weaken. Etc.

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My Morse G/D has never shown any change even when played in the hot weather we so rarely get in England :(. I am unable to say if it improved from new since it was a demonstrator I bought off Chris Algar and so had been through a few hands before mine. It's been a good, reliable Morris instrument.

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Timson
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concertinas do indeed break in over time. whether or not they can change overnight i am not sure. i swear that my instrument sounds different after playing during a hot day just 2 days ago, as well. however, this could be that i became used to how it sounded outside, and now it sounds different inside (although it is the same as before). sometimes, when i change acoustical environments, i notice characteristics of the sound that i did not notice before when returning to my usual environment.

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My C/G Morse was practically new when I bought it. It was a bit brash then and has definitely mellowed in a bit. I should probably add that note to the review I have posted on the C.net static pages, since there are links to it.

 

Ken

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My C/G Morse was practically new when I bought it. It was a bit brash then and has definitely mellowed in a bit. I should probably add that note to the review I have posted on the C.net static pages, since there are links to it.

 

Ken

 

Mine is behaving similarly and I absolutely love her! A special thanks to all who responded. It seems as though I am continually in debt to the fine folks at this forum. Kudos all around, Dave.

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The older Morse (both English and Anglo) sound mellower and sweeter to me than the new ones. Whether this is due to aging or a difference in the concertinas to begin with I don'lt know, but I have tried them side by side in the same room, and there is a definite difference.

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The older Morse (both English and Anglo) sound mellower and sweeter to me than the new ones. Whether this is due to aging or a difference in the concertinas to begin with I don'lt know, but I have tried them side by side in the same room, and there is a definite difference.

 

I believe that it is generally accepted that a new, decent quality concertina requires some very considerable 'running-in' before it starts operating to it's full potential. This was my not altogether surprising experience. Increasing familiarity with the instrument obviously played a part but there is far more to it than that. The tone and action of the instrument improved immeasurably as the years went by, or so it seemed to me, thereby proving the true benefits of regular exercise, coupled with the occasional dose of sensible maintenance. I try to apply the same principles to myself but cannot claim to have achieved the same degree of success !

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