Jump to content

Making reedpans


Recommended Posts

Hi All

 

Greg kindly pointed me in the right direction in terms of the type of wood used to make reedpans (English Sycamore). I'm still learning my woodworking skills and am keen to find out what tools would historically have been used to cut the slots in the wood for 'traditional' reedframes to sit. Also, if making a reedpan today would the same tools be used or would the preference be for modern power tools instead?

 

I'm looking to have a go at making some, so if anyone can point me in the right direction that would be great!

 

Thanks

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave,

Lots of ways to skin this cat of cutting reed pan slots. The pic that Tom referred you to is from a Pathe film of the Wheatstone concertina factory. You used to be able to download a lower quality free version from Pathe. There was some recent discussion on cnet about this and I believe some members may have a way of sharing their videos.

 

In a nutshell the picture is of a pin router. On one side is the dovetail cutting router bit of 8 degrees. The opposite side has a pin. The blank reed pan is clamped/fixed to a template. By moving the template cut out on the pin the router cuts the reed pan on the opposite side. If you are doing more than one set of reed pans this is the way to go.

 

For a "one of" it may be easier to make several adjustable jigs and route the slots and vents as in any other routing project.

 

I forgot to add that there are CNC controlled routers that can be programmed to do the cuts. Some are industrial grade; some small and relatively affordable for the advanced home workshop.

 

And, I suppose with a lot of patience it might be possible to do it all by hand. The advantage of a router is not only speed but a uniform, controlled depth along with an accurate 8 degree angle.

 

Greg

Edited by Greg Jowaisas
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave,

........ The pic that Tom referred you to is from a Pathe film of the Wheatstone concertina factory. You used to be able to download a lower quality free version from Pathe. There was some recent discussion on cnet about this and I believe some members may have a way of sharing their videos.

..........

Greg

HI Greg

 

It's available for viewing again from Pathe. It works in the US.

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=417&session_lightbox_add=1&record_id=417&media_urn=1733

 

Thanks

Leo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave,

........ The pic that Tom referred you to is from a Pathe film of the Wheatstone concertina factory. You used to be able to download a lower quality free version from Pathe. There was some recent discussion on cnet about this and I believe some members may have a way of sharing their videos.

..........

Greg

HI Greg

 

It's available for viewing again from Pathe. It works in the US.

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=417&session_lightbox_add=1&record_id=417&media_urn=1733

 

Thanks

Leo

 

Thank you, Leo. There are many things to learn about making concertinas by watching the Pathe clip.

 

I never quite worked out exactly what was happening with the adjustment mechanism on the top of the Wheatstone router. And I've never come close to duplicating the speed of the workman cutting fretwork on the jig saw!!

And the bellows ladies are an example of speed and effeciency as well. All in all quite inspiring.

 

Greg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

with regard to the use of power tools- My father, who was a cabinet maker seemed to make practically anything out of wood with about a dozen hand tools. I tried the power tool route and discovered that if you can't do the job with manual tools - all that power tools do is b***er the job up quicker.

have fun

chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One more quick question on this...

 

Am I right in thinking that the 'thin wood dividers' that are mounted on to the reed frame that enclose each reed chamber are also made of thin strips of English Sycamore?

 

Thanks!

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...