Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
bellowbelle

Bandoneon 'sighting' - player for Paolo Conte

Recommended Posts

I see there are at least two threads about bandoneons, recently.

 

I'm totally uninformed about them at all, but now I'm wondering if anyone has a comment on the one in this video:

 

You don't get a decent view (or audio) of the bandoneon until the solo -- starting at about 1:19 of the video.

 

Apparently Paolo Conte is well-known in Italy. But, typical of me, I never heard of him until today. Sounds great, I think. Don't know when I'll get to Italy, though -- heheh. All I do is go to the grocery store, about a mile away -- that's travel. But, I can always get a CD I guess.

 

I don't know the name of the bandoneon player.

 

Edit added:

I think this is the bandoneon player, but I'm not sure --

bandoneon player

Edited by bellowbelle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm wondering if anyone has a comment on the one in this video:

Must be one of the unisonoric systems with all that bellows shaking going on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here are a couple of lovely bisonoric examples.....this nameless maestro is my favorite bandoneon player on youtube....these are supposedly simple versions for students, but if i could play nicely like this, i wouldn't need a more complex arreglo, er, arrangement....

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GF_Vi5g15i8&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0lz7qMdZe0&feature=related

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since this is turning into a list of our favorite bandoneon players and YouTube videos:

 

(playing Grieg!)

 

I also like Luis di Matteo, but he doesn't appear to have any video out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
this nameless maestro is my favorite bandoneon player on youtube...

"Por una Cabeza" Tango, eh? I'd say it's more like "Sin cabeza" Tango.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
this nameless maestro is my favorite bandoneon player on youtube...

"Por una Cabeza" Tango, eh? I'd say it's more like "Sin cabeza" Tango.

 

Rene Marino Rivero has a wonderful completely solo, two-CD Folkways recording of traditional tango music from uruguay...I'm a fan of traditional "guardia vieja" style tango, and always looking for solo, duo, trio records where you can really hear how the bass-versus-melody arrangement is working....this is a favorite of mine...there are track samples hearable here, and i believe on amazon as well...

 

http://www.cduniverse.com/search/xx/music/pid/1055110/a/Bandoneon+Pure:+Dances+Of+Uruguay.htm

Edited by ceemonster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rene Marino Rivero has a wonderful completely solo, two-CD Folkways recording of traditional tango music from uruguay...

Wow, check out the copious liner notes, with a lot of information on bandoneon history, keyboard layouts, techniques, etc:

 

http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetails.aspx?itemid=2320

yeah....it's a lovely mini-booklet that comes inside the two-cd folkways set. diagrams, history, notes about the different approaches to bellows manipulation. really cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my link:

(the bass player of the orquestra at the very end of the tango is me)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carel Kraayenhof is another great bandoneon player. I first heard of him (and the instrument) on a PBS special during which he played with violinist Joshua Bell.

 

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here are a couple of lovely bisonoric examples.....this nameless maestro is my favorite bandoneon player on youtube....these are supposedly simple versions for students, but if i could play nicely like this, i wouldn't need a more complex arreglo, er, arrangement....

 

 

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

 

 

Bisonoric, you say? He seems to play only on the draw, which effectively renders the instrument unisonoric and unidirectional. A Bandoneon has enough alternate fingerings to allow you to play notes while closing the bellows, even if the draw is your preferred bellows direction!

Perhaps the piece in question is just an exercise for "Playing on the Draw"?

 

Cheers,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most bandoneon players play mostly on the draw nowadays. The old bandoneon masters used to master both directions equally. And indeed, it is possible to play fully chromatic in both directions, but the fingering is completely different, so very difficult to master. I've met Carel last weekend. He's an old friend of mine. Did you know that he also plays English concertina? But he only plays Irish music on it, he told me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most bandoneon players play mostly on the draw nowadays. The old bandoneon masters used to master both directions equally. And indeed, it is possible to play fully chromatic in both directions, but the fingering is completely different, so very difficult to master. I've met Carel last weekend. He's an old friend of mine. Did you know that he also plays English concertina? But he only plays Irish music on it, he told me.

[Perhaps the piece in question is just an exercise for "Playing on the Draw"?]

 

Nope. Many, probably most, of the Argentine tangueros play bisonoric bandoneon primarily on the draw, using the air button to close at phrase breaks. I believe Alfredo Marcucci plays in both directions, and I think, that Rivero, who we were discussing above, said something in that lavish accompanying booklet with his CD that you should be adroit enough with your bellows organizing to use the air button very little, which seemed to suggest that he too also plays in both directions.

 

Well, they all play some in both directions. But most of them consider the pull-and-aspirate method to be the best way of getting the authentic tango sound. I'm pretty sure that Betram Levy mentioned on this site or somewhere that when he began learning tango bandoneon he was playing in both directions, but that the maestros told him he'd get the tango rhythm and movement into it better if he played on the pull. Playing on the pull is done by many players in the arty post-Piazolla style as well as many in the dance-music "guardia vieja" traditional style; it's all over youtube. Piazzolla himself can be seen playing primarily on the draw all over youtube.

 

I saw a comment on a thread about this on some bandoneon site where someone weighed in with the opinion that stylistic rationalisations for this are nonsense, and it is only lazy work-avoidance given what a big undertaking it is to learn all notes in both directions on this box. But I've seen plenty of comments to the effect that the reason really is stylistic, i.e., that pull-and-aspirate furthers what in irish music might colloquially be called the "nyah" of the dance tune, that swing or shimmy or shake that really makes it move. you can see them doing it six bandos in unision sitting in a row in the big orchesetras on the 'tube, it's hilarious. but it really does kinda go, barrrrrrrrrrrrhummmmmphh when you swooosh it shut with the air button, just like a tango.

Edited by ceemonster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[[Perhaps the piece in question is just an exercise for "Playing on the Draw"?]

 

Nope. Many, probably most, of the Argentine tangueros play bisonoric bandoneon primarily on the draw, using the air button to close at phrase breaks. I believe Alfredo Marcucci plays in both directions, and I think, that Rivero, who we were discussing above, said something in that lavish accompanying booklet with his CD that you should be adroit enough with your bellows organizing to use the air button very little, which seemed to suggest that he too also plays in both directions.

 

Well, they all play some in both directions. But most of them consider the pull-and-aspirate method to be the best way of getting the authentic tango sound.

 

I know that a lot of tangueros play primarily on the draw - primarily! My point was that the player in the YouTube clip was playing exclusively on the draw, and the piece wasn't a typical tango, so there were no "aspiration pauses", and the aspiration between the phrases was intrusive, and spoiled the music for me.

 

Not that playing in one direction is necessarily a bad thing! Irish fluters also play in one direction, whereas the fiddlers and free-reeders have two directions, and pipers have a continuous airflow. But the fluters very often breathe at the "wrong place" - not between phrases, but after the first, emphatic note of a phrase. So they have no hiatus between phrases, creating the effect of a continuous string of quavers. The emphatic first note sort of overshadows the hiatus that follows it. I like the effect - it truly makes a virtue of necessity.smile.gif

 

With a bisonoric instrument, it is not a necessity! tongue.gif

 

Cheers,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...