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Salvation Army Concertina with case


maria741969
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Thank you Greg and other posters here on this very knowable and friendly site.

 

I am asking $1,000.00

 

 

I want to sell this 48b steel reed Lachenal (Crane system) Salvation Army Triumph concertina. 1916-1917

It comes with its original case.

 

 

From the great response I have received their is a market for it.

 

 

My email is maria741969@yahoo.com I have better pictures in my email attachments and can forward them to you.

 

The serial #3760.

 

I live in Long Beach California. USA

 

 

I will donate 2% of the sale to this site.

 

Thank you

 

Maria

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Edited by maria741969
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Maria sent me some pics and asked me to post them for her:

 

 

 

Please refer questions to Maria.

 

Greg

 

 

Greg that was so thoughtful. Thank you very much for taking the time to post them for me...

 

Any feed back of the value and the year

 

serial #3760

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Blimey it's a Crane. I suppose I shouldn't be surprised given the Sally Army provenance.

 

I'll kick off; others will fine tune it I have no doubt. Maria, you have a 48 key Crane-system duet, rosewood ends, metal keys. It's going to be 1920's at a guess; Crane system is a relatively recent thing. Looks a decent but not special instrument; rather a minority interest in the concertina world so might take a little while to sell; should be worth hundreds rather than thousands of ££, exactly how much will depend on condition. So worth cashing in, but not for Anglo levels of reward!

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Barleycorn Concertinas (the most respected dealer in vintage concertinas) says they sell these for "£1000+ for a decent steel reeded 48k Crane or 55k Maccann - Wheatstones always dearer than Lachenals." That is of course the retail price from a well-thought-of dealer -- a private seller who's not a concertina expert would expect to get less.

 

Blimey it's a Crane. I suppose I shouldn't be surprised given the Sally Army provenance.

 

I'll kick off; others will fine tune it I have no doubt. Maria, you have a 48 key Crane-system duet, rosewood ends, metal keys. It's going to be 1920's at a guess; Crane system is a relatively recent thing. Looks a decent but not special instrument; rather a minority interest in the concertina world so might take a little while to sell; should be worth hundreds rather than thousands of ££, exactly how much will depend on condition. So worth cashing in, but not for Anglo levels of reward!

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Blimey it's a Crane. I suppose I shouldn't be surprised given the Sally Army provenance.

 

I'll kick off; others will fine tune it I have no doubt. Maria, you have a 48 key Crane-system duet, rosewood ends, metal keys. It's going to be 1920's at a guess; Crane system is a relatively recent thing. Looks a decent but not special instrument; rather a minority interest in the concertina world so might take a little while to sell; should be worth hundreds rather than thousands of ££, exactly how much will depend on condition. So worth cashing in, but not for Anglo levels of reward!

Basically correct. The instrument looks virtually identical to my own 48-button Crane, including the fretwork, except that mine has a "Crane & Sons" label and serial #135. Both were made by Lachenal, who made the first Cranes for the Crane & Sons label, but later made them under the Lachenal company name, while calling the type of concertina by the Sally Army name of "Triumph" (as seen on Maria's hand straps).

 

I would make two adjustments to Dirge's comments about the Crane system:

  • I would say the Hayden duet layout for concertinas is "relatively recent", the patent having been granted as of 1986. But in contemporary terms, I don't think the Crane system (patent 1896) is significantly more "recent" than the Maccann system (patent 1884).
  • I would say that all duet systems are "a minority interest in the concertina world". The Crane has lately been gaining in popularity, though, and a nice 48-button Crane (Maria's looks to be in good condition) will almost certainly sell; the only questions are, how quickly and at what price?

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Looks a decent but not special instrument; rather a minority interest in the concertina world so might take a little while to sell; should be worth hundreds rather than thousands of ££, exactly how much will depend on condition. So worth cashing in, but not for Anglo levels of reward!

But 48-key Cranes are pretty desirable and not very common, so there are often people hanging around waiting for one to turn up. Mr Algar does not always have one when someone wants one. So you might have to wait a little while for a purchaser, but I doubt very long. But, yes, a lot less valuable than an Anglo of the same quality.

 

About 5 years ago, I saw a near identical instrument, in newly restored condition, for sale by Mr Algar at £900. (Time has passed, so maybe he would ask a bit more these days.) He had a metal ended Wheatstone adjacent to it for rather more, and if I had been in the market for a Crane (I was thinking about it at the time) I would have taken the Lachenal: the action was very sensitive and smooth (much better than on my own Lachenal 42-key Maccann), and I preferred the sound.

 

Unless your instrument is in newly restored condition, it will be worth a few hundred less than these sorts of values, because of the cost of restoration. Whether it is in concert pitch or not will also be worth a hundred or so, as there are 96 reeds to tune. People will tend to assume the worst, so if you can demonstrate the worst is not to be assumed, that will help the price.

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But 48-key Cranes are pretty desirable and not very common, so there are often people hanging around waiting for one to turn up. Mr Algar does not always have one when someone wants one.

Perhaps so. On the other hand, Mr Algar (aka Barleycorn Concertinas, aka cocoa111 on eBay) has a 48-key Wheatstone Crane on eBay right now with a starting price of £800 -- and I believe that he listed this same concertina on eBay a while back without a sale. On the other other hand, I believe that this is a 1953 Wheatstone rather than a "top period" one, which could lower its desirability and selling price.

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But 48-key Cranes are pretty desirable and not very common, so there are often people hanging around waiting for one to turn up. Mr Algar does not always have one when someone wants one.

Perhaps so. On the other hand, Mr Algar (aka Barleycorn Concertinas, aka cocoa111 on eBay) has a 48-key Wheatstone Crane on eBay right now with a starting price of £800 -- and I believe that he listed this same concertina on eBay a while back without a sale. On the other other hand, I believe that this is a 1953 Wheatstone rather than a "top period" one, which could lower its desirability and selling price.

That £800 is a
starting
price,
not
a
Buy It Now
price. While it's possible that it will indeed sell for only £800, or even not at all, believe that Chris sets his starting prices with the expectation that the final prices will be noticeably higher, and usually that is the case.

But lets watch this one, and see what happens. Then we can debate whether the result teaches us anything significant.

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But lets watch this one, and see what happens. Then we can debate whether the result teaches us anything significant.

 

 

Sorry, I'd love to but I have some important drying paint to watch instead.

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But lets watch this one, and see what happens. Then we can debate whether the result teaches us anything significant.

Sorry, I'd love to but I have some important drying paint to watch instead.

My "Old Paint" was drying, too, but I led him down to the watering hole, and now he's no longer thirsty.
;)

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But lets watch this one, and see what happens. Then we can debate whether the result teaches us anything significant.

Sorry, I'd love to but I have some important drying paint to watch instead.

My "Old Paint" was drying, too, but I led him down to the watering hole, and now he's no longer thirsty.
;)

 

 

Isn't there a saying about that?

 

Is it " You can take a horse to water but you can't make him take any interest in an ex Sally Army Crane concertina." Or have I got that wrong?

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But lets watch this one, and see what happens. Then we can debate whether the result teaches us anything significant.

Sorry, I'd love to but I have some important drying paint to watch instead.

My "Old Paint" was drying, too, but I led him down to the watering hole, and now he's no longer thirsty.
;)

Isn't there a saying about that?

 

Is it " You can take a horse to water but you can't make him take any interest in an ex Sally Army Crane concertina." Or have I got that wrong?

Like so many conclusions based on averages, that doesn't necessarily apply to every individual.

 

With at least some, you Maccann.
B)

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The paint is now officially dry. The Barleycorn Wheatstone Crane on eBay sold at its minimum price: GBP 800.00 (approximately US $1,200).

 

But lets watch this one, and see what happens. Then we can debate whether the result teaches us anything significant.

Sorry, I'd love to but I have some important drying paint to watch instead.

My "Old Paint" was drying, too, but I led him down to the watering hole, and now he's no longer thirsty.
;)

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...
I wound up buying this one. It needs a significant amount of work but the sellers were willing to adjust the price accordingly. It will be on its way to Greg Jowaisas at some point for restoration.

I've got it back from Greg now after a major restoration, including new pads and valves, new 7-fold David Leese bellows, a re-tune to concert pitch and lots of work on the action, seals etc. I'm still in the early stages of learning the Crane system (I already play Anglo and Hayden) so I can't play it to its full potential yet, but from what I can tell so far it seems to be a very nice concertina with very responsive reeds for a Lachenal and a reasonably quiet action.

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