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Warwick Folk Festival


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For those of you who may be interested, for the first time at Warwick we are doing a non Folk Session of music on the Saturday

24th July which will feature 20s - 50s,Music Hall,Jazz, Blues, Country and Western Music (No rules). It has never been tried before at Warwick and Mike Ainscough (Will Fly)Guitarist and myself will be hosting it. I hope some of you can join us.

 

A more exciting event could be happening next year (2011) as the featured musical instrument is THE ENGLISH CONCERTINA.

Many of you may remember the Anglo superb weekend with JK, Jody, Brian Peters,Last Nights Fun (Chris Sherburn)and the concert in the evening which was one of the best concertina folk evenings I have ever been to. I will post more information about this

later this year.

Al

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Hi Alan , nice idea . I enjoyed that session at Bradfield last year , Put another nickle in the nickleodeon etc etc.

 

Will the session be for all types of instruments or just concertinas?

All instruments.

I may even take my swanee whistle

Al

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Hi Alan , nice idea . I enjoyed that session at Bradfield last year , Put another nickle in the nickleodeon etc etc.

 

Will the session be for all types of instruments or just concertinas?

All instruments.

I may even take my swanee whistle

Al

Wot abaht a Day concerto in the key of W (Warwick) or at least a special toon for Swanees (plural) with massed instruments?

 

I have just cleaned out my dark brown/blackish 1920s merrican one** and fear I should have used grease instead of oil as it is a bit (air) leaky on parts of the slide.

If you (and hopefully others) have yours, I am game to learn a special toob toon for Warwick.....?? :blink: :blink:

 

** 4th visual at:

http://whistlemuseum.com/2009/03/29/strauss-slide-whistle--many-other-samples--at-work-to-be-cont.aspx

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Hi Alan , nice idea . I enjoyed that session at Bradfield last year , Put another nickle in the nickleodeon etc etc.

 

Will the session be for all types of instruments or just concertinas?

All instruments.

I may even take my swanee whistle

Al

Are you going to bring a kazoo too?

 

Then you could have a game of swanee/kazoo. ;)

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Hi Alan , nice idea . I enjoyed that session at Bradfield last year , Put another nickle in the nickleodeon etc etc.

 

Will the session be for all types of instruments or just concertinas?

All instruments.

I may even take my swanee whistle

Al

Are you going to bring a kazoo too?

 

Then you could have a game of swanee/kazoo. ;)

There are already 2 kazoos in my bag (plus combs and greaseproof paper, an ocarina which still defeats me and a water-fed bird warbler but latter only works with highland mineral water for Scottish toons). Can someone lend me a Welsh triangle? :)

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On a more serious note we are bringing with us a lovely Jazz singer and her husband who plays guitar

To add a bit of class

No LDT I shall only bring Will, Kazoo is buzzing around that weekend and cannot make it.

Al

Would this kind of fusi-eon music fit the bill? it is part of melodeon.net's tune of the month exercise and shows how you can jazz up a funeral/lament - must have been an Irish wake on Cognac de Limousin

 

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Would this kind of fusi-eon music fit the bill? it is part of melodeon.net's tune of the month exercise and shows how you can jazz up a funeral/lament - must have been an Irish wake on Cognac de Limousin

 

If you want a classic example of how a funeral march can be given a modern treatment (I do not know what category you would put it in), take a look at Henry Purcell's funeral march for the death of Queen Mary, 1695 AD.

 

In a modern guise, it became the title theme to the film 'A Clockwork Orange', a very different arrangement from the original.

I thought the film was mostly weird and boring, but I loved its music. It introduced me to Beethoven's 9th Symphony, which I still regard as one of the best pieces of music ever written.

 

- John Wild

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Would this kind of fusi-eon music fit the bill? it is part of melodeon.net's tune of the month exercise and shows how you can jazz up a funeral/lament - must have been an Irish wake on Cognac de Limousin

 

If you want a classic example of how a funeral march can be given a modern treatment (I do not know what category you would put it in), take a look at Henry Purcell's funeral march for the death of Queen Mary, 1695 AD.

 

In a modern guise, it became the title theme to the film 'A Clockwork Orange', a very different arrangement from the original.

I thought the film was mostly weird and boring, but I loved its music. It introduced me to Beethoven's 9th Symphony, which I still regard as one of the best pieces of music ever written.

 

- John Wild

Vinteresting: and of course the dodgy fiddle-case carrying players have got their hands on it too: :P

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I've been talking about the subject to a few friends and we agree that the immediate post war ,old time free and easy's or singalongs or tune-ups in the pubs of our youth, often with a piano or small 'combo' were like this. No distinction as long as it was good communal music. the earlier music halls in the rough end of town sound like the same thing, before they became 'conventional'.

 

Often the folkies would pass the music room to go upstairs to a folk club with a closed door.

 

I suppose today's youngsters would do the sme to go upstairs to an underground gig

 

In our music pubs The Harlequin and The Red House it was an open session and it attracted all kinds of musicians and listeners and spun off some eclectic soloists or groups. Again the strict folkies would go upstairs.

 

I think there's a place for both but lets keep it live.

 

Acoustic, can u jam, unplugged , nu folk all seem to be doing the same thing

 

Last night we went to se the Carolina Chocolate Drops a black American trio doing everything from old time fiddle tunes, banjo and jug stomps and a version of Reynardine and a rap song to banjo, human beatbox and fiddle and vocal, no concertina sadly but when i asked them they said they were open to it! I'm going to send them some of that South African Squashbox music

 

 

Very enjoyable

Edited by michael sam wild
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I've been talking about the subject to a few friends and we agree that the immediate post war ,old time free and easy's or singalongs or tune-ups in the pubs of our youth, often with a piano or small 'combo' were like this. No distinction as long as it was good communal music. the earlier music halls in the rough end of town sound like the same thing, before they became 'conventional'.

 

Often the folkies would pass the music room to go upstairs to a folk club with a closed door.

 

I suppose today's youngsters would do the sme to go upstairs to an underground gig

 

In our music pubs The Harlequin and The Red House it was an open session and it attracted all kinds of musicians and listeners and spun off some eclectic soloists or groups. Again the strict folkies would go upstairs.

 

I think there's a place for both but lets keep it live.

 

Acoustic, can u jam, unplugged , nu folk all seem to be doing the same thing

 

Last night we went to se the Carolina Chocolate Drops a black American trio doing everything from old time fiddle tunes, banjo and jug stomps and a version of Reynardine and a rap song to banjo, human beatbox and fiddle and vocal, no concertina sadly but when i asked them they said they were open to it! I'm going to send them some of that South African Squashbox music

 

 

Very enjoyable

Michael the sing songs , the music jam sessions are exactly what we are hoping to create.

The Pub sing songs formed a major part of the British revival from depression after the War. As a little boy I used to stand outside wishing I was part of it.

Although I hope this session at Warwick is not completely taken over by the old pub songs it is that type of atmosphere I hope we can create. It would be great if you could bring some of your mates along and support this. As far as I know it has not been done at a Folk Festival before and good on Warwick to give it a try. It will be a great shame if it is not well attended.

Al

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I remember that melodeon player Milkie Keith ( yes a milkman) and his pals did 50s songs at the Endeavour during Whitby folk week. Very popular with the holidaymakers and the older folkies.

The 50s were a funny period we were coming out of austerity and yet still singing pre war type music then Elvis, Lonnie Donegan , Dylan and The Beatles came along, Changed - changed utterly, a terrible beauty was born ( To quote Yeats )

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I remember that melodeon player Milkie Keith ( yes a milkman) and his pals did 50s songs at the Endeavour during Whitby folk week. Very popular with the holidaymakers and the older folkies.

The 50s were a funny period we were coming out of austerity and yet still singing pre war type music then Elvis, Lonnie Donegan , Dylan and The Beatles came along, Changed - changed utterly, a terrible beauty was born ( To quote Yeats )

 

Boat number 666

 

Melodeon singalong Good Night Irene Dance Concert Bradfield 2008

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/InsightandMind#p/u/1/fau6Yacc20A

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  • 5 months later...

We have now confirmation of the Warwick Session

It is on Sat 24th July 12 Midday to 3PM The Millwrights Arms

It would be great to see any of you there

Mainly Non Folk but just about anything else

No admission charges

Al

Edited by Alan Day
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We have now confirmation of the Warwick Session

It is on Sat 24th July 12 Midday to 3PM The Millwrights Arms

It would be great to see any of you there

Mainly Non Folk but just about anything else

No admission charges

Al

 

Just dusting my spats and trilby off. I recall, as an 18-year old in 1962, popping in to pubs in Morecambe in Lancashire - tempted in by the sound of some old boy playing the piano with everyone singing along. Some years later I was playing piano in pubs myself - pints bought for me by the punters lined up on the top of the piano!

 

When did you last see a piano in a pub? Or last have a sing-song in a pub? Let's hope we can re-create some of that atmosphere at Warwick...

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