Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
steven r. arntson

Quartet with Anglo

Recommended Posts

's a video of The Toy Boats, a quartet I'm in, playing Ivanovici's "Donauwellen." Lineup: Anglo concertina, toy piano, ukulele, and glockenspiel.

 

Best,

Steven

 

 

That was very charming. Would love to see you guys in person. By the way,. this is the same tune Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin used in their song, "Anniversary Song" from the motion picture "The Jolson Story". I didn't realize the tune might have pre-dated their use of it.

Edited by CaryK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What fun! I've heard that tune for years and never knew the name of it. Thanks for the cheer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi Folks - that's lovely - I really enjoyed it rolleyes.gif

 

thanks and all the best

Me too. Great fun, and quite classy in an eccentric way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's what Wikipedia says about the tune:

 

Waves of the Danube (Romanian: Valurile Dunării; German: Donauwellen; French: Flots du Danube; Russian: Дунайские Волны) is a waltz composed by Iosif Ivanovici (1845–1902) in 1880, and is one of the most famous Romanian tunes in the world. In the United States, it is frequently referred to as The Anniversary Song, a title given by Al Jolson when he and Saul Chaplin released an adaptation of the song in 1946.

 

...

 

"Waves of the Danube" became known in the United States only half a century later. Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin published it in 1946 under the name of "The Anniversary Song" ("Oh, how we danced on the night we were wed") and as their own composition. The 1946 sheet music of the song credits the composers as Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin with music by Iosif Ivanovici. Jolson and Chaplin wrote the lyrics while Chaplin adapted Ivanovici's music.

 

Too bad the window changed from "Palmer Bros." to "For Lease" between the various takes you filmed (I even notice different displays in the "Palmer Bros." window, with or without sacks in the lower right corner).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Too bad the window changed from "Palmer Bros." to "For Lease" between the various takes you filmed (I even notice different displays in the "Palmer Bros." window, with or without sacks in the lower right corner).

 

We discussed continuity a lot after the video was finished! There's a moment with a closeup of the glockenspiel playing its highest note, and then magically the instrument plays even higher notes immediately after . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's what Wikipedia says about the tune:

 

Waves of the Danube (Romanian: Valurile Dunării; German: Donauwellen; French: Flots du Danube; Russian: Дунайские Волны) is a waltz composed by Iosif Ivanovici (1845–1902) in 1880, and is one of the most famous Romanian tunes in the world. In the United States, it is frequently referred to as The Anniversary Song, a title given by Al Jolson when he and Saul Chaplin released an adaptation of the song in 1946.

 

...

 

"Waves of the Danube" became known in the United States only half a century later. Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin published it in 1946 under the name of "The Anniversary Song" ("Oh, how we danced on the night we were wed") and as their own composition. The 1946 sheet music of the song credits the composers as Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin with music by Iosif Ivanovici. Jolson and Chaplin wrote the lyrics while Chaplin adapted Ivanovici's music.

 

Too bad the window changed from "Palmer Bros." to "For Lease" between the various takes you filmed (I even notice different displays in the "Palmer Bros." window, with or without sacks in the lower right corner).

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeCKdyJfSWI&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7WaMigIHhk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent stuff. even the continuity gaffes were funny!.

All you guys need to do is get Tom Waits on vocals..!

Keep it up.

Ralphie (From London Town)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We discussed continuity a lot after the video was finished! There's a moment with a closeup of the glockenspiel playing its highest note, and then magically the instrument plays even higher notes immediately after . . .

 

I rather enjoyed the continuity "issues"! My little group are going to make a video soon - I'm tempted to suggest we introduce some little "mistakes" ourselves :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the dis-continuity, it seemed to go with the music style, very nice.

 

 

I'm so slow on the uptake, I thought these "errors" were there on purpose. unsure.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the continuity issues are all there on purpose--they were discussed while we were editing the film, and we generally liked the variety they lent to the production.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had this on a music box when I was young... at least it was the first 16 measures.

 

Waves of the Danube (Romanian: Valurile Dunării; German: Donauwellen; French: Flots du Danube; Russian: Дунайские Волны) is a waltz composed by Iosif Ivanovici (1845–1902) in 1880, and is one of the most famous Romanian tunes in the world. In the United States, it is frequently referred to as The Anniversary Song, a title given by Al Jolson when he and Saul Chaplin released an adaptation of the song in 1946.

 

...

 

"Waves of the Danube" became known in the United States only half a century later. Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin published it in 1946 under the name of "The Anniversary Song" ("Oh, how we danced on the night we were wed") and as their own composition. The 1946 sheet music of the song credits the composers as Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin with music by Iosif Ivanovici. Jolson and Chaplin wrote the lyrics while Chaplin adapted Ivanovici's music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh how we danced on the night we were wed

We danced all the night 'cos the room had no bed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh how we danced on the night we were wed

We danced all the night 'cos the room had no bed.

I first learned it as

 

"... I needed a wife like a hole in the head."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...