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two little problems with my linota


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Dear all,

I have a vintage 40b Linota which was recently completely refurbished by C. & R. Dipper.

They did a great job and the instrument is now ways better than it was previously,

as for the tuning, balance of the sound, action, look, etc...

However after a few weeks I've noticed two little problems which annoy me a little bit.

I guess the best thing to do would be to ask Colin, but I don't want to send it again

abroad for an undetermined number of months... so maybe someone can help me here.

 

Problem #1 :

One of the keys (F#/D, left hand, little finger) is a bit "stiff". More precisely,

the problem is that the resistance of the spring is not even. At first it exerts some resistance,

as if something was bloking it, and then it slips more easily. As a result, I often miss

to play the note ; or when I succeed, the button often produces a "click" as a result of the extra

effort I have to put to displace it. I've noticed that some other buttons behave a bit similarly

but this is only embarassing with the F#/D because I use it often and with one of my

weakest fingers... So has anybody ever encoutred (and fixed) such a problem on a vintage instrument ?

I first thought it was because the bushing was too tight but it doesn't seem to be the case.

Could the spring be arranged or replaced by a softer one ?

 

Problem #2 :

One of the keys (c#/f#, right hand, bottom of third row) sometimes keep on sounding weakly a few

seconds after the button is released (usually up to the next bellows reversal). The problem

is not always present, and seems to depend upon the wheather (I guess you won't be surprised by that...)

It seems that the pad is not perfectly airtight or is not maintened enough by the spring. A solution

could be to add a layer to the pad to increase its width, but I dont't know what material I should use for that.

Or put a stronger spring but the key is already hard as the lever is among the shortest ones. What do you think ?

 

Thanks for suggestions and best wishes to all of you !

David

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Dear all,

I have a vintage 40b Linota which was recently completely refurbished by C. & R. Dipper.

They did a great job and the instrument is now ways better than it was previously,

as for the tuning, balance of the sound, action, look, etc...

However after a few weeks I've noticed two little problems which annoy me a little bit.

I guess the best thing to do would be to ask Colin, but I don't want to send it again

abroad for an undetermined number of months... so maybe someone can help me here.

 

Problem #1 :

One of the keys (F#/D, left hand, little finger) is a bit "stiff". More precisely,

the problem is that the resistance of the spring is not even. At first it exerts some resistance,

as if something was bloking it, and then it slips more easily. As a result, I often miss

to play the note ; or when I succeed, the button often produces a "click" as a result of the extra

effort I have to put to displace it. I've noticed that some other buttons behave a bit similarly

but this is only embarassing with the F#/D because I use it often and with one of my

weakest fingers... So has anybody ever encoutred (and fixed) such a problem on a vintage instrument ?

I first thought it was because the bushing was too tight but it doesn't seem to be the case.

Could the spring be arranged or replaced by a softer one ?

 

Problem #2 :

One of the keys (c#/f#, right hand, bottom of third row) sometimes keep on sounding weakly a few

seconds after the button is released (usually up to the next bellows reversal). The problem

is not always present, and seems to depend upon the wheather (I guess you won't be surprised by that...)

It seems that the pad is not perfectly airtight or is not maintened enough by the spring. A solution

could be to add a layer to the pad to increase its width, but I dont't know what material I should use for that.

Or put a stronger spring but the key is already hard as the lever is among the shortest ones. What do you think ?

 

Thanks for suggestions and best wishes to all of you !

David

 

Hi David,

A number of button issues which at first glance might seem a weak spring can be caused by other factors.

 

Alignment of the lever arm is crucial to a properly working button. If you remove the button, the lever arm should pass directly over the guide pin hole.

 

If a bushing seems to tight either around the button at the fretwork or where the lever arm passes through the button use a smooth hard tool such as an awl or a polymer chopstick to burnish the bushing.

 

Unhook the spring from the lever arm and make sure the lever moves freely up and down. NEVER oil a sticky lever. If it seems to need lubrication use graphite either in an evaporative soulution or even rubbed from a pencil lead.

If the rivet is still binding then that is really an issue for an experienced repairman.

 

Do check your springs. Not only for tension but to make sure they are properly seated in the action board and that their hook is not catching on the button or bushing. Springs work best up and down and any lateral forces reduce their effeciency.

 

Best of luck. If you are still stuck you can always ship it to me. The repair workbench is open.

 

Greg

 

PS. And, in this winter weather and dry central heating check to make sure the pivot post hasn't come loose.

Edited by Greg Jowaisas
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Thanks Greg & Tom for quick response.

I'll open it to check all parts of the mechanism (when the kids are asleep...)

 

 

;

Problem #1 - Is the top of that button the same height as the others?

 

Yes.

Before sending it to Dipper the skyline was quite erratic; now it is perfect.

David

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Because you've had your concertina "recently completely refurbished", david, I'll say it's the bushings causing both problems because they'd be sensitive to change in location temperature and humidity if they were snug. Before doing anything else, try burnishing them as Greg explained.

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The second issue could be a short lever with a button bushing, (not the one in the end, the one in the button) that is a little tight. Short levers demand a greater angle of swing in a lever for the same amount of pad lift and if the bushing is tight the button might not easy stay vertical as it lifts and will start to jam in the end bushing. When this happens there can be little sign of an issue when the end is off, but if you attempt to hold the button very vertical while cycling the mechanism you can sometimes feel the button tightening as it rises. The cure is to remove the button bushing and snip say 1mm off the end of it and replace it. Tweezers probably required. Make sure the gap is at the bottom.

 

With issue 1, take it apart and watch what happens...

 

Chris

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According to your advices I opened the beast and tortured the bushings with various tools.

Now both problems seem to be fixed !

Thanks for the help, I had not thought about the bushing inside the buttons.

Hope that the problems won't show up again next time the weather changes...

 

David

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