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Beginner; How Much To Spend?


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if you rent from the buttonbox, i think they would be renting one of their morse concertinas, which are much higher quality (and much more expensive) than the rochelles. you can also buy a rochelle from them, and trade it up to get one of their morse concertinas. i believe wim wakker and bob tedrow do the same, as well.

 

When last I checked, the Button Box's rental instruments were Stagis (I decided instead to spend money on a used Morse that they happened to have). This was long enough ago that Rochelles weren't available yet, but I wouldn't be surprised if they were renting them as well now.

 

jdms

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I enquired very recently about renting a Bb/F concertina to try out, and was told they do not rent out Morses, only the less valuable instruments.

 

As I would not be looking for an exquisite instrument, just acceptable for my purposes, that would be no issue. One day I will call them, when I find the time in my day to call them.

Edited by Yote
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They are surprisingly reasonable on their rental prices (buttonbox). It is not a full credit to a new instrument however, but a half-credit. For a Rochelle I was quoted today $25 USD per month with a 3 month minimum, plus shipping. So after three months that is $37.50 credit, not so bad. May be willing to give that a go a bit sooner than I thought, I figured it would be a lot steeper.

 

-Yote

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They are surprisingly reasonable on their rental prices (buttonbox). It is not a full credit to a new instrument however, but a half-credit. For a Rochelle I was quoted today $25 USD per month with a 3 month minimum, plus shipping. So after three months that is $37.50 credit, not so bad. May be willing to give that a go a bit sooner than I thought, I figured it would be a lot steeper.

 

-Yote

Hi Yote

 

Sounds like a good deal to me. I hope you're not mixing two different transactions into the full/half credit. If you rent for 3 months, and like it enough to purchase it, they will allow you 50% of your rental price and you can keep it. If you elect to not pursue further, then you return it and everyone is happy.

 

The way I read their website page is if you PURCHASE a Rochelle, then the full purchase price (100%) will be applied when you upgrade it to a "new R. Morse & Co. concertina".

 

They are two separate ideas. By the way there is a used Rochelle on their web page under instruments in stock, just to get an idea how well they hold their value.

 

Thanks

Leo

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if you rent from the buttonbox, i think they would be renting one of their morse concertinas, which are much higher quality (and much more expensive) than the rochelles. you can also buy a rochelle from them, and trade it up to get one of their morse concertinas. i believe wim wakker and bob tedrow do the same, as well.

 

When last I checked, the Button Box's rental instruments were Stagis (I decided instead to spend money on a used Morse that they happened to have). This was long enough ago that Rochelles weren't available yet, but I wouldn't be surprised if they were renting them as well now.

 

jdms

 

 

I enquired very recently about renting a Bb/F concertina to try out, and was told they do not rent out Morses, only the less valuable instruments.

 

thanks for the clarifications.

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Thanks for checking, yes I understood how the rental part went towards the purchase of the same instrument, but was unaware of the full credit to the upgrade at another time. Pretty good to know though, so if I go with the Rochelle I then have some good space to upgrade at some point if I so see fit. I figure now all I need to do is get the rental probably later this month, and find myself a good book for teaching myself this instrument.

 

For folks still reading this, any recommendations for a "teach yourself" book?

 

-Yote

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For folks still reading this, any recommendations for a "teach yourself" book?

 

-Yote

 

Wim Wakker's book that comes with the Rochelle is good. I also found Bertram Levy's "Demystifying the Anglo Concertina" (which comes with a CD- helpful if you play by ear) excellent. Button Box has them both.

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.....................

For folks still reading this, any recommendations for a "teach yourself" book?

 

-Yote

Hi Yote

 

There are a few that are popular, unfortunately they are beyond my comprehension since I play with an English not an Anglo. Someone else can probably suggest a good book or two. Personally I think it will depend on if you can read sheet music, and/or if you can play by ear.

 

In the mean time, Peter Trimming has made a nice website to get you started.

http://petertrimming...urselfanglo.htm

 

And Alan Day has his available with a PDF at the bottom

http://www.etanbenam...ertina%20Tutor/

 

Between the two of them, there should be enough information to get your curiosity started.

 

Thanks

Leo

OOPS! Sorry Bill. We were posting at the same time :o

Edited by Leo
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I never really tried playing by ear, as when I played the banjo I used tab, and with my bagpipes I do read sheet music but it is only 9 notes with no sharps or flats. So I can't really say that I play by ear as my ears suffered some damage, though I can work on it, as well as sheet music.... I figure it will just come down to which I try and seems easier for me!

 

@Leo, I may come back and ask your opinion if I figure I would prefer the English to the Anglo. I know such a decision is one that has to be made my the player, as I am fighting the battle, but figured the Anglo was a good place to start for someone who has limited musicality knowledge.

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I never really tried playing by ear, as when I played the banjo I used tab, and with my bagpipes I do read sheet music but it is only 9 notes with no sharps or flats. So I can't really say that I play by ear as my ears suffered some damage, though I can work on it, as well as sheet music.... I figure it will just come down to which I try and seems easier for me!

 

 

The CD is nice to have, even if you aren't trying to play by ear, because you can hear how the tune is supposed to sound. Having said that, the Levy book is a very good introduction to theory and technique. I personally found it easier to use, and more satisfying than the Rochelle tutor.

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I never really tried playing by ear, as when I played the banjo I used tab, and with my bagpipes I do read sheet music but it is only 9 notes with no sharps or flats. So I can't really say that I play by ear as my ears suffered some damage, though I can work on it, as well as sheet music.... I figure it will just come down to which I try and seems easier for me!

 

@Leo, I may come back and ask your opinion if I figure I would prefer the English to the Anglo. I know such a decision is one that has to be made my the player, as I am fighting the battle, but figured the Anglo was a good place to start for someone who has limited musicality knowledge.

Hi Yote

 

My decision on an English was only based on me getting lost in the logic of the in and out note differences on a harmonica, melodeon, anglo, and other such instruments and I can't play by ear. I've tried both. The English system just seemed easier to read music and play. The instrument is set up with the music lines on the left and the spaces on the right. When in the playing position there are 4 horizontal rows with the notes in the middle two rows and the accidentals on the top and bottom rows. Just made better sense to me at the time.

 

My decision was independent of style of music, or particular musician, or anything other than the layout. Here are two pictures.

http://www.concertin...ges/finger6.htm

http://www.d-and-d.c.../fingering.html

 

It all depends on how your brain works.

 

If you haven't yet committed to a particular system, then these three sites have enough information for you to study for an hour or ten.

http://www.concertina.net/

http://www.concertina.com/

http://www.concertina.info/

 

Thanks

Leo

P.S. I can type better than I can read music, but it's getting better with practice. My only formal training is some lessons on a piano accordion as a child so it's limited.

Edited by Leo
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Thanks for the really informative email Leo! I looked through a good amount of that, got some good info.

 

As I play the bagpipes and that is very restricted in the style it can play, I may be leaning more towards the English as it seems more robust in the styles capable. Being an engineer and thus terribly stuck in patterns, I think I can learn how to read music.

 

Besides, the idea of being able to play ragtime on a concertina is kinda charming as it were, and seems the English may be more capable of such.

 

I got meself some thinking to do.

 

-Yote

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Thanks for the really informative email Leo! I looked through a good amount of that, got some good info.

 

As I play the bagpipes and that is very restricted in the style it can play, I may be leaning more towards the English as it seems more robust in the styles capable. Being an engineer and thus terribly stuck in patterns, I think I can learn how to read music.

 

Besides, the idea of being able to play ragtime on a concertina is kinda charming as it were, and seems the English may be more capable of such.

 

I got meself some thinking to do.

 

-Yote

Hi Yote

 

Don't sell an anglo short. It's capable of lots of styles

 

 

Thanks

Leo :o B)

Edited by Leo
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You might also consider a Hayden Duet. I mainly play Anglo but I've recently been enjoying learning Hayden on an Elise (from the same line as the Rochelle Anglo and Jackie English).

 

Thanks for the really informative email Leo! I looked through a good amount of that, got some good info.

 

As I play the bagpipes and that is very restricted in the style it can play, I may be leaning more towards the English as it seems more robust in the styles capable. Being an engineer and thus terribly stuck in patterns, I think I can learn how to read music.

 

Besides, the idea of being able to play ragtime on a concertina is kinda charming as it were, and seems the English may be more capable of such.

 

I got meself some thinking to do.

 

-Yote

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Anglo, English.... and now duet. Y'all are trying to confuse me :P

 

I would have gone straight to Anglo, but trying to make sure it will be appropriate for the styles I am interested in. I like the idea of playing hornpipes, jigs and so forth, but also wanting to do ragtime and jazz as that is what my friends play on their own instruments.

 

I'll be having to read up some and listen to some playing to figure out what really works best for me. Default is Anglo, just want to be certain.

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Anglo, English.... and now duet. Y'all are trying to confuse me :P

:lol:

 

I would have gone straight to Anglo, but trying to make sure it will be appropriate for the styles I am interested in. I like the idea of playing hornpipes, jigs and so forth, but also wanting to do ragtime and jazz as that is what my friends play on their own instruments.

Now that's a slippery slope I don't want to go down. I'm not sure there is enough room on Paul's server to handle that question. :blink: Each system has their own merits and limitations.

 

But since someone else mentioned it, here are a couple of samples of a duet

http://www.youtube.c...BCli0Bik&fmt=18

http://www.youtube.c...OOmmQA5Q&fmt=18

 

In all the clips I posted, they are in the hands of outstanding players all working within the limitations of each type of instrument. Here's the disclaimer and weasel words before i get trounced on: "IMHO" it's not necessarily the instrument.

I'll be having to read up some and listen to some playing to figure out what really works best for me. Default is Anglo, just want to be certain.

How about one or two of each :blink: :(

 

Thanks

Leo

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Keep in mind that this forum is rather heavily Anglo-centric, and definitely slanted toward ITM. Having posted here that I enjoy playing jazz, klezmer, ragtime and classical duets on my EC, I was firmly informed that the EC is not "authentic" or "appropriate" for those genres. <_<

 

Personally, I don't give a rat's patoot about "authenticity" as long as my friends and I are enjoying the music! :P Our duets, trios and quartets regularly combine the EC with clarinet, oboe, guitar, mandolin, banjo, pennywhistle, flute, autoharp and/or piano. And, not being tradition-bound, we play whatever we like. With its capacity for playing in any key, the EC is remarkably versatile! B)

 

You'll get some very good advice here, but it ain't gospel. Keep an open mind, look for the instrument that suits YOU, and enjoy playing whatever music YOU like! :)

Edited by yankeeclipper
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