Jump to content

The trouble with Pipes!


Ptarmigan

Recommended Posts

Last Thursday night we had Uilleann, Border & Scottish Smallpipes at our session in Portrush, then last night in Bushmills, we had a different Uilleann Piper, plus the Scottish Smallpiper & a Northumbrian Piper!

 

Now as a Fiddler I just love playing along with Pipes, although last night was hard work, because I had to tune back & forward between the Uilleann & Scottish Smallpipes, all night long as they were never exactly in with each other.

 

However, as the venue was pretty warm, the Pipes weren't on their best behaviour & although I did manage to play my Wheatstone along with the Northumbrian Pipes a few times, even if I had known the Scottish or Uilleann tunes on my Concertina, I couldn't possibly have played it.

 

With some instruments I find you can sometimes get away with it, if they are not exactly in tune, but with Concertinas & Pipes, if they are not bang on .... to me they just seem to SCREAM at you! 7.gif

 

How common is it, to have a variety of different pipes at your session & how do you cope with them?

 

Cheers

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How common is it, to have a variety of different pipes at your session & how do you cope with them?

 

Dick, never mind how do you cope with having a variety of different pipes at a session, how do the different pipers cope with each other? Pipes are rare at sessions I attend in London and when musicians do bring pipes along, they tend to be either Northumbrian or French. As long as the musician adjusts his/her pitch to that of the all the other instruments, before launching into a tune, there's not usually a problem. If there was, I'd ban them from joining in and let them play solo once in a while.

 

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I quite like playing with Northumbrian pipers in D or G and I manage to play in F if they are not too fast ( I have C/G Anglo)

I like the Irish pipes plus conc if there is just one player and they are in tune. I have learned a lot by listening to pipers and like the effects which have influenced players like Noel Hill et al.

 

Pipers seem quite intense and competitive so a few together gets a bit exclusive

 

'A nest of pipers'!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How common is it, to have a variety of different pipes at your session & how do you cope with them?

 

Dick, never mind how do you cope with having a variety of different pipes at a session, how do the different pipers cope with each other? Pipes are rare at sessions I attend in London and when musicians do bring pipes along, they tend to be either Northumbrian or French. As long as the musician adjusts his/her pitch to that of the all the other instruments, before launching into a tune, there's not usually a problem. If there was, I'd ban them from joining in and let them play solo once in a while.

 

Chris

 

Och yer a hard man Chris. I feel, for all those poor wee Pipers! :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'A nest of pipers'!

Michael, surely you mean .... A Proliferation of Pipers! or perhaps even A Plague of Pipers!:ph34r:

 

But seriously, if in tune, I love Northumbrian Pipes & English Concertina & also Uilleann & Anglo. Those combinations work really well, but of course, only when they are really in tune with one another.

 

Cheers

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How common is it, to have a variety of different pipes at your session & how do you cope with them?

A pen knife?
:ph34r:

 

Ooooooo that's a bit risky Jim, isn't it?

 

After all, I wouldn't like a Pen Knife anywhere near my Bellows!

 

Which reminds me, a bloke knocked a whole pint of Guinness over my Mandolin last week .... perhaps HE was trying to tell me something! :o :huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

they are a dying breed,occasionaly you get a briar but rarely a meerschaum.

they are almost as extinct as the Corncrake :lol:

 

LOL. Aye sadly Dick, my Grandad & Dad both smoked a pipe, so I grew up loving the smell of Pipe tobacco.

 

At 18 I had a go myself but couldn't get used to all the saliva it generated.

 

Good job really cause if I'd kept at it, I might not be here now!

 

I remember enjoying Clan & Condor.

 

Cheers

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Only one way to beat pipers in odd pitch - piano accordion with big musette (I've got a Morino like that).

 

Aye Geoff but how do we beat a big PA in a session?!

Cheers

Mike

I know where your coming from Mike, but of course they are not ALL bad.

 

For example, we had a fella over from England join our session last night, Clive, playing a dry tuned Salterelle & I must say, I enjoyed playing along with my Wheatstone. As it was a dry box, the Concertina blended in with the PA very nicely.

 

Of course, on the odd occasion when he cranked up the volume the wee box was drowned out & that's the major problem with some PA players, that habit of quite happily drowning out every other instrument around them!

Thankfully though, Clive turned out to be a very sensitive player & spent the night blending in beautifully.

 

Clive plays in a wee Ceili band over there, in England ..... anyone here know him?

 

2418695890102727105S425x425Q85.jpg

 

Cheers

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dick are you sure it's not David Blunkett our local MP and ex Home Secretary , he got married the other day so maybe it's hishoneymoon trip!

Hey Michael, give us some credit. :rolleyes:

 

After all, it's one thing to allow a PA player to join us, but we do have standards to maintain!

 

We have no intention of stooping so low as to allow a politician to join us, even one with some moral fibre & even a small degree of credibility, never mind someone like D.B.! :ph34r:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My partner works at the Samaritans charity shop next to the Victoria Methodist hall where he was married. Gordon Brown and Sarah turned up but not the Blairs as promised.

 

Big expensive security effort. They located a suspicious object in the tower with an infra red scanner. It turned out to be a bottle of milk left by a builder. Must have been some life in it eh?

 

Watch out you terrorists or you'll get curdled

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...