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Russian War Song


m3838
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Don't suppose you can find an accordion or piano score for Soldaty V Pohod easily can you? If not don't worry; I just had a look and failed; I thought being able to read Russian might help...

 

(Really, only if it's easy)

Hi Dirge

 

Everything I looked for came up with a translation of the title to "Let's Go". Under that assumption, I came up with this information:

 

It is the song from the after-war movie "Maxim Perepelitsa" which is about after-war soldiers.

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/Mul...ments/V_Put.txt

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcHSp5IJqe8&fmt=18

 

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/Mul...fterww2.htm#Let

 

There is a MIDI version here:

http://www.midi-karaoke.info/214d46b5.html

Click on the download link and rename it with a .mid extension, or play it on the website player.

 

Once you've downloaded it, you can play it in "Notation Player". It will play the file, and separate the tracks to a score on the screen as sheet music.

http://www.notation.com/DownloadNotationPlayer.htm

 

Not easy but not impossible :blink: :rolleyes:

 

Thanks

Leo :P

Edited by Leo
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Here again.

Another Gem of song. WWII song called "Casual Waltz".

Please review this video

...................................

----------------------------

Then, if you are incliined, give me your critique.

A friend of mine, reviewing my translation of a russian folk tale, called it "delightfully bad English".

So I'm a bit humbled now.

Still, would like to continue with my casual translations of great gems from the best era of Russian popular song.

I think this song is rather international, from the perspective of a simple man, drawn into war, regardless of side and ideology. It's about we start digging these themes, as it seems to me the world is ready for yet another clash.

I'm familiar with great American songs from the same era, but still would like to get hints at British and French, German and Dutch songs of the same feel: melancholy and dolefullness, grief, letter home. Something clear from ideology and commendable optimism.

Thanks.

Hi Misha

 

I won't critique your translation. I have enough difficulty myself with American English as a primary language. I found this information.

 

A translation of "Fortuitous waltz" ("Sluchainyi val's")

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/Mul...ics/SlWaltz.txt

 

From the movie

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/Mul...w2.htm#Sl_Waltz

 

There are 5 pages of Russian songs from this site:

1. Post War Songs

2. Pre-revolutionary Songs

3. Pre-War Songs (between Civil war and World War II)

4. Civil War Songs

5. Soviet Wartime Compositions

 

They can be accessed from the menu on the left under the top multimedia tab.

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/tree.htm

 

There is a MIDI version here:

http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Bistr...rye_pesni_e.htm

 

Thanks

Leo :unsure: B)

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Don't suppose you can find an accordion or piano score for Soldaty V Pohod easily can you? If not don't worry; I just had a look and failed; I thought being able to read Russian might help...

 

(Really, only if it's easy)

Hi Dirge

 

Everything I looked for came up with a translation of the title to "Let's Go". Under that assumption, I came up with this information:

 

It is the song from the after-war movie "Maxim Perepelitsa" which is about after-war soldiers.

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/Mul...ments/V_Put.txt

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcHSp5IJqe8&fmt=18

 

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/Mul...fterww2.htm#Let

 

There is a MIDI version here:

http://www.midi-karaoke.info/214d46b5.html

Click on the download link and rename it with a .mid extension, or play it on the website player.

 

Once you've downloaded it, you can play it in "Notation Player". It will play the file, and separate the tracks to a score on the screen as sheet music.

http://www.notation.com/DownloadNotationPlayer.htm

 

Not easy but not impossible :blink: :rolleyes:

 

Thanks

Leo :P

 

Thanks Leo, but that would give me an orchestra score so still more work than I am willing to put in. I'd had a look myself and failed. I just thought Misha, Russian speaker (and reader more to the point) might be able to spot it in a list somewhere not accessible to me. Nice of you to try though!

 

I don't like casual waltz as a title either. Impromptu Waltz? Spur of the Moment Waltz? Excuse Me Waltz

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A translation of "Fortuitous waltz" ("Sluchainyi val's")

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/rkkaww2/Mul...ics/SlWaltz.txt

 

May be it's me, but I think the above "translation" is horrendous.

It's not even close to the original, regardless of Pigin-English.

Give me critique, please.

I would greatly appreciate it.

I was looking for "Soldiers! March on!" (or "On the March", or " Let's go"), transcribed for single bayan, but didn't find anything. It's not particularly popular song outside of the Army, where it is sung as Marching song throughout Russia.

I'm looking for better, more elaborate transcription of "The Casual Waltz" (but what could "Casual" be substituted with?).

The one I published is little too simple.

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Did I suggest 'Impromptu' for casual?

Just as I was about to suggest the same. :)

 

Other words that I suspect have compatible connotations, but which I don't think work as well in a lyric are:

  • adventitious
  • extemporaneous
  • fortuitous
  • serendipitous
  • spontaneous

...short pause...

Just did what I should have done in the first place... got out my Russian-English dictionary. Then I double-checked with an English thesaurus.

 

The first meaning given for the Russian word is "by chance", and the English thesaurus does give that as one of the meanings of "casual", though it's one I wasn't familiar with. To me, "casual" has always meant "informal" or "unplanned" or "relaxed" or (and this is what I think makes it especially wrong) "without deep feeling". So while "casual" is one possible "correct" translation, I'm probably not the only person who would misinterpret it.

 

Words that better reflect what I suspect is the original meaning would be "fortuitous", "accidental", or "incidental". But "impromptu" is probably still the best, as it can imply both that the meeting which led to the dance was unplanned, and that the decision to dance was a spur-of-the-moment improvisation.

 

P.S. I'm not going to go through the whole song with my dictionary. I would love to do it, but I just don't have the time. I'm not even close to fluent in the language (and never was), and I'd need to use the dictionary for at least every second word. :ph34r:

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It's more of a "chance encounter" or "fortunate encounter" than a casual meeting.

Maybe "Chance Waltz" or "Fortunate Waltz" would do it.

 

Clouds fill the peaceful night sky

But it is strange that your hand lies quietly within mine

 

I, who searched an hour for the waltz melody floating through the air

After the alarms had stilled and while the town slept

 

To where I, a stranger, seem to have returned to my faraway home

yet have found you and the melody in this room

 

Where, though I apologize for completely forgetting how to dance

We waltz in a darkened hall

 

And may talk, sing and be friends, or not

but still we waltz in the dark

 

Until first light

When, opening your gate

 

I join my comrades on the march

and I leave your little town.

Edited by Laitch
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It's more of a "chance encounter" or "fortunate encounter" than a casual meeting.

Maybe "Chance Waltz" or "Fortunate Waltz" would do it.

 

Clouds fill the peaceful night sky

But it is strange that your hand lies quietly within mine

 

I, who searched an hour for the waltz melody floating through the air

After the alarms had stilled and while the town slept

 

To where I, a stranger, seem to have returned to my faraway home

yet have found you and the melody in this room

 

Where, though I apologize for completely forgetting how to dance

We waltz in a darkened hall

 

And may talk, sing and be friends, or not

but still we waltz in the dark

 

Until first light

When, opening your gate

 

I join my comrades on the march

and I leave your little town.

 

I like "Chance Encounter"

or "Chance Waltz".

I just didn't think it would be correct English, imagine. Now I know better.

Now the above translation doesn't fit the rhythm and doesn't rhyme. I can use expressions for trying to improve my text though. Some of it sounds strange to me, the way I never heard English to have been used. "I, who searched an hour for the waltz melody floating through the air

After the alarms had stilled and while the town slept" - for example, would make me raise my brows. But anyways, please keep on submitting. With your help, I hope to make a text "English-recognized". It probably be cute to have some "Russianisms" in it, but the bulk must be done right.

To Dick Miles - Dick, not only English songs belong to concertina forum, don't you think? A good song is worth a lot and is hard to find. I'm picky.

To Dirge - don't worry, it'll be time till I find more elaborate version.

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To Dick Miles - Dick, not only English songs belong to concertina forum, don't you think? A good song is worth a lot and is hard to find. I'm picky.
thats grand,I will put up Jimi Hendrix then :lol:

Ah, that would bring back memories. He was a classmate of mine.

But I rather doubt that anyone has a video (or 8mm "home movie") of Jimi singing the Garfield High School alma mater.

 

Iwas under the mistaken belief that the songs had to be concertina related,I enjoyed your film but I didnt see any concertinas.

I must put up the sound of music, :lol: ...

Better be careful with that one, Dick. After all, the hills are alive... and I'm not sure how they would feel about it. ;)

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  • 2 weeks later...

How about Serendipity Waltz ??

 

 

"Serendipity is the art of making an unsought finding." Pek van Andel (1994)

"Serendipity is the faculty of finding things we did not know we were looking for." Glauco Ortolano (2008)

Both quotes taken from the Wikipedia entry for the word

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How about Serendipity Waltz ??

 

 

"Serendipity is the art of making an unsought finding." Pek van Andel (1994)

"Serendipity is the faculty of finding things we did not know we were looking for." Glauco Ortolano (2008)

Both quotes taken from the Wikipedia entry for the word

 

Does it imply that the soldier was subconsciously looking for distraction from his destination?

Because the song's sub layer is his dedication to the cause, not that he was drafted and thinks of the time when the service is over.

He's into total destruction of the enemy or death etc. The waltz encounter is totally unsought, purely chancy, unexpected. "Unexpected Waltz"? Doesn't sound good, does it?

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