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Found 6 results

  1. I've since purchased an Edgley, and would like to move along my starter box. Lightly used, from a smoke-free, pet-free home. Originally purchased in 2011, this is a second generation instrument. The gig bag has a broken zipper pull, and because I have tiny hands the straps were replaced with smaller ones, the original straps are still in the bag. I'd prefer to keep the tutor, but would include it (contains annotations in pencil) if you'd like it. Concertina is located in Vancouver, Canada. Shipping to the USA would likely cost $40, please bear in mind that any import/sales taxes are out of my control. Price is in US dollars. Thanks! Michelle
  2. I'm selling my Peacock Hayden Duet concertina by Concertina Connection with 42 buttons + air that I only recently acquired second-hand from another forum member who also didn't stick with the duet system so played it only lightly. It's in great, unblemished shape with a matt black finish and excellent 6-fold Wakker bellows that haven't yet been played in. Domed and bushed metal buttons. Serial no. 090, made when there were 3 versions of the Peacock - Standard, Special and Custom. Now I believe there are only 2 models available. This is an accordion-reeded hybrid duet but I find that it has the closest to a "concertina" type sound of other hybrids I have played. Lovely tone and good volume. It is lightweight and has a very responsive and smooth action. It comes with the original, good quality hard case. So why am I selling? Well, I've been well and truly bitten by the concertina bug (or concertina acquisition syndrome) and have been trying out different systems, but living where I do means buying unseen. I've simply come to the conclusion that I'm more suited to the English system! I'm not looking to make money on the concertinas I sell but I hope to avoid losing any so I'm asking what I paid: £1,500 or the equivalent in euros. As well as costing less than a new model, there will also be none of the very expensive import duties for European buyers purchasing from the USA. I'm also willing to listen to reasonable offers. I can send more photos and probably a basic recording to anyone interested. I'm happy to discuss it over the 'phone or Skype if required, just send me a PM if interested. Thanks for reading, Dean
  3. This thread is intended for folks like me: total concertina newbies who have recently gotten a Jackie from Concertina Connection. While this box has a good sound and plays easily enough, it does have some durability issues that will manifest themselves after a relatively short time. I've had mine about 2 weeks now, probably putting about 30 hours on it, and already I've had to open it up twice. I suspect that I'm not alone in this, so I'm posting this to give some confidence to those who are afraid to do their own minor repairs. First off, check out this video by Daddy Long Les where he's got his Jackie taken apart. This will show you what's inside better than I can explain it. Now that you're familiar with the general anatomy, here are key details: DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN THE SCREWS. The wood is all very soft so there's a real threat of stripping threads. USE THE CORRECT SIZE OF SCREWDRIVER. The screw metal is very soft so there's a real threat of wallowing out the heads if your screwdriver is the wrong size or not applied forcefully enough down into the screw. The concertina consists of 3 main assemblies: the central bellows and the 2 nearly identical end assemblies. The end assemblies are each attached to the bellows by 6 small Philips screws and washers, and come off the bellows as unitsWhen reassembling the ends to bellows, fasten the screws as you would the lug nuts on a car tire, in a star pattern working them all slightly tighter over several sequences. This is to make sure the end fits evenly and snugly on the bellows. Otherwise you get air leaks through the joint and the concertina won't play well or at all. The end assemblies consist of 2 major parts held together by 2 tiny Philips screws on the underside: The outer black end cap to which the strap and rest are attached The action, which consists of the reeds, valves, buttons, springs, and rocker arms all mounted on 1 big mass of various wood pieces all glued together. Just undo the 2 tiny screws enough to separate the end cap from the action, without removing the screws from the action. This helps prevent losing them. Without the end cap attached, the buttons are free to wobble around and have a tendency to fall off their rocker arms, have their tails come out of their holes, and otherwise not be where they should be. This makes reassembling the end cap to the action a frustrating, fiddly process, the most difficult single thing in the whole process. Fortunately, the buttons all seem to be identical so if several fall completely off, it shouldn't matter which rocker you put them back on. The ends of the thumb straps are held in place by a knob that screws into the edge of the end cap. To adjust the strap, unscrew and remove this knob, stick it through a different hole in the strap, and screw it back into the end cap. TOOLS: Jewelers Philips screwdrivers of several sizes Needlenose pliers Tweezers Magnifying lens or glasses (depending on your eyesight) Lok-Tite or similar product to keep nuts on bolts COMMON PROBLEMS 1. Straps or Rests Coming Loose The straps and rests are attached to the end caps by tiny countersunk Philips screws with nuts and washers on the inside. These nuts tend to loosen or come off completely. When the nuts come off, they will rattle around inside the action but can be shaken out the sound holes. Be careful not to lose them. To fix: Remove the end with the loose part from the bellows. Remove the end cap from the action. Reassemble the strap/rest fasteners using Lok-Tite. While you're in there, tighten up and apply Lok-Tite to all other strap/rest fasteners so you don't have to do this again. Getting a screwdriver on the strap screws will require unscrewing the strap-adjustment knob. 2. Stretching Straps The thumb straps are made from some very cheap fake leather, basically a roll of vinyl with some spongy white fabric inside. This quickly stretches, especially if you play with the concertina on your knee and only move 1 end of it routinely. If you're already on the last hole provided and the strap is too loose, poke a new hole with an ice pick. You don't want or need a very big hole because the strap knob's shaft is only a couple millimeters wide. OTHER POINTS The rocker arms can easily pivot side-to-side as well as up-and-down. Thus, when finagling the buttons into proper formation for reassembling the end cap to the action, it's possible that pushing a button sideways will push its valve the same amount in the opposite direction, which can cause the valve not to completely cover its hole. So before putting the cap back on, be sure all the valves are properly covering their holes. Once you've managed to get the end cap back over all the buttons at once and have the action seated fully into the end cap, you can no longer see any of the action nor even the holes and valves. Therefore, before screwing the end cap back onto the action, test each button for proper springiness. If it springs back up and stays straight, then it's on its rocker arm OK and all SHOULD be well (unless you've moved a valve sideways, which you can't see). If the button has no spring, then you have to take the end cap back off and put the button back on its rocker arm. It's a good idea to only remove 1 end assembly from the bellows at a time. This way, you can be sure you put the end back on the bellows with the same orientation as before. This is important because the screw holes don't line up if you've rotated the end assembly relative to the bellows. If you must remove both ends at once, apply some masking tape to the bellows ends where the thumb straps go, so you can properly orient the end assemblies when you put them back on. Also write on the masking tape which end is left and right. As mentioned above, make sure there are no gaps between the end assembly and the bellows. When reattaching the end assembly, get all the screws in the end assembly until their tips are flush with the bottom of the end cap before placing the assembly on the bellows. Make sure the end cap is oriented correctly and then partially tighten all the screws in a star pattern as with lug nuts until fully seated.
  4. Hey folks. Up for sale is my basically brand new Jackie concertina. There are NO marks, scratches, dents, or damage of any kind as far as I can tell. Whenver I played it I was always gentle, and whenever I was finished it was placed back into it's gig bag. Also included is the book that came with it on how to play. The book DOES have some wear and tear, but is still completely readable/usable. here is my craigslist link: http://sandiego.craigslist.org/esd/msg/5218745213.html I am still very much a beginner on the instrument and would love to keep improving, but I've fallen on some hard times and I am forced to sell some of my favorite things, including my musical instruments. I purchased this concertina for about $420 shipped, so I'd love to see it go for $400, mainly because that would keep me going for another week, but I know that's asking a lot considering it is technically a used concertina. If possible, I'd prefer it to be someone local so I don't have to ship it, but I will if I have no other choice. Thank you everyone.
  5. Howdy everyone! I've juuuuuuuuuusssst purchased my first english concertina from Concertina Connection! A Jackie, naturally. After much research I decided I needed a fully chromatic instrument that was well suited for (eventually) complex solo pieces in modern, classical and other varying styles, but could also accompany singing, and I felt the English system was best suited to that. I'm a fairly good guitar player, mostly Spanish and Flamenco, but a bit of classical here and there as well, but reading music is still a challenge for me. Trying to change that at the present moment. Anyhow. I know this is gonna be a fun experience, one I hope continues for a long time, and I am very excited to get to know all of you over time
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