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Found 75 results

  1. Lachenal 48 key English concertina with wooden case for sale £275 After having spoken with someone who knows I have reduced the price from £350 to £275 as there is some work required to get this concertina up to standard. It is now also on eBay, Buy IT Now or Offers => https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173649507649 The four section bellows are in generally good condition apart from a small air leak at one corner. Some keys are out of tune and two are not working. Serial number is 31330 which dates it between 1889 and 1895. Postage and packing to UK mainland is £20 If you have any questions or would like more pictures please message me on here.
  2. gcoover

    Anglo and EC sale

    Well, it’s certainly not the amazing Jowaisas Christmas Pyramid, more like the Coover Autumnal Quadrangle, but I’m putting up for sale four concertinas that have been sitting around taking up space when they should be getting played instead. Wheatstone 30-button Anglo concertina #51362 in C/G - $1850 Metal buttons, metal ends, early 1950’s, dovetailed steel reeds (regular reeds, not crimped), tuned to concert pitch, 8-fold leather bellows, Wheatstone handstraps. Recently refurbished and retuned by Greg Jowaisas who thought the reeds were “better than average” for instruments of this period. This is the concertina featured on the cover of “Christmas Concertina”. Comes with the original black square case that has sexy crushed red velvet inside. Gremlin 30-button Anglo concertina in G/D - $950 Metal buttons, metal ends, accordion reeds, concert pitch, 6-fold airtight bellows, riveted action. An early hybrid concertina with accordion reeds built as a budget model by Gremlin in the early 1980’s and purchased a few years from Marien Lina. I had taller handrests made for it, but can also include the shorter original ones. Featured on the cover of “Anglo Concertina in the Harmonic Style” and “Easy Anglo 1-2-3”. This is the second G/D I’ve owned but I find I still never play in G/D, so time to find this one a new home. Comes with a black square case with built-in combination lock. Lachenal 20-button Anglo concertina #198455 in C/G - $650 Bone buttons, mahogany ends, dovetailed steel reeds, concert pitch, 5-fold original bellows still airtight, new handstraps, recently refurbished by Greg Jowaisas (“a good 20b from a late period in Lachenal's history”). Probably built in the 1920’s, and although a fairly inexpensive instrument at the time it has a nice tone, somewhat soft due to the leather baffles (which could be removed if desired). Featured on the cover of “Civil War Concertina” and “Easy Anglo 1-2-3”. I’ll even throw in a copy of “Civil War Concertina” since all the tunes in that book can be played on a 20-button instrument. Comes with a beat-up hexagonal wooden case that works ok but has definitely seen better days. Wheatstone 22-button “May Fair” English Concertina #1263 – $550 This is a very rare 22-button English concertina that would be ideal for song accompaniment. It’s a Wheatstone May Fair English concertina #1263 in close to mint condition, built sometime in the 1950’s. It has 22-buttons (10 on the left and 12 on the right), wooden ends, 6-fold airtight bellows, accordion-style reeds in concert pitch, and comes with its original Wheatstone tweed case which is also in near-new condition. Having only 22 buttons, it is fully chromatic from G' below middle C to e above high c, 1.5 octaves. That’s it. It does not have any notes above e in the upper octave, so it probably would not suit if you’re wanting to play lots of Irish tunes, but it would be ideal for accompanying singing. Good examples would be the playing of Louis Killen, Tony Rose and other singers of traditional songs. You can play Planxty Irwin or Carolan’s Draught (or the first part of King of the Fairies), but it’s much better for songs like Pleasant & Delightful or Blackwaterside. Every note plays well, the bass notes are strong and clear, and the bellows are incredibly airtight. It plays way much better than one would expect for a budget instrument, has really nice and very strong tone, and even has fancy little violin-style f-holes in the fretwork. I'll be putting these on eBay shortly, but wanted to give the loyal cnet crowd a first chance. Shipping and insurance is extra to wherever you are. Simply PM me with your email address if you're interested and I can send you more photos of the interiors and exteriors, or I could even give you a Skype tour or a tune. Remember, Christmas is only a few short weeks away! Gary
  3. Good morning all from Dallas, Texas, I am a church musician and beginner English concertina player. Purchased a preowned Jackie last Christmas and have played it almost daily since then. I have been reading and researching on this site and learning from this community with much appreciation. I must confess that I'm beginning to think about purchasing that "next level" of English concertina. I've begun to focus on searching for a 48key treble Wheatstone or Lachenal english concertina in the range of $1,000-2000. (According to one site, that's 774-1548 GBP). I have not had an opportunity to play either instrument so I look forward to doing so. I'm going to be in Cambridge and Edinburgh in October and hope to be able to play some instruments. Two questions: 1. Are there significant differences in the Wheatstone and Lachenal instruments (touch, sound)? 2. If you have something for sale in the price range, will you private message me? Thank you in advance for your responses.
  4. While checking shopgoodwill.com this evening, I saw a Wheatstone EC, #18875. The Wheatstone Ledgers show this as a Baritone. It appears to be in good condition, and is located in Ontario Canada. I'll be out of the country when the auction ends, but perhaps someone here would be interested.
  5. I have a nice looking English system Mayfair concertina for sale or px for a G D melodeon , I brought this with an Anglo when I was starting my concertina journey ........ The Anglo won . As far as I can tell it's nicely in tune and all working . I believe it's from 1955. Asking £375 .
  6. Hi, all! Does anybody know anything about possible concertina meet-ups, happening i June, in Stockholm Sweden? We would so much love to hear somebody who knows how to, play our George Case concertina (found here: ). What I'm thinking of is perhaps some Pub evening, or some other type of get-together. BR, Mats
  7. bogheathen

    1867 Wheatstone English 48

    Wheatstone 1867 48-Key Treble English concertina #18261 Bought from The Buttonbox in 2017 with refurbished 5-fold bellows, new valves, tuned A=440, and new fitted hardshell case.
  8. Wheatstone May Fair 30 key English concertina for sale. There is one key that works in only one direction. Other than that it is in sound condition. Please see the pictures below. £400.00 ono Update, now listed on eBay, "Buy It Now" or "Make An Offer" => https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173173837635
  9. Lachenal 48 key English concertina for sale, 6 fold bellows and in original box. There is no serial number in evidence and two keys work in one direction only. £600 ono Update, now listed on eBay, "Buy It Now" or "Make An Offer" => https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/173173609724 Please see the pictures below:
  10. Early English Concertina. Unnamed. Buttons: 48 Stained red/black and marked with note values on whites. Bellows: four-fold. Dark green with starburst papers. Bellows are sound. Serial number: 112 Reeds: brass in brass shoes with squared ends, stamped with note values. Valves cut square as per original. Condition: excellent internal and external condition. Fully restored on a historical basis by Andrew Norman in 2016. Plays at modern concert pitch. Sweet tone, not loud. Case: Victorian scientific instrument case with sliding top and handle. Name card of owner pasted in the top: Daniel Whitelaw, Glasgow. The name of the maker cannot be ascertained; but Andrew Norman thought is resembled work by William Dove. 1,700 pounds sterling. Estimated shipping to Europe, USA or Australia: 80 pounds.
  11. I'm new to this forum and to the concertina community and need some advice. A bit of background: I am a choral conductor and pianist. I'm the music director at a church in Dallas, Texas. I read music fluently and play by ear a bit but not am not gifted this way. In recent years I've discovered I enjoy a good stout in an Irish pub so have become curious about ITM (Irish Traditional Music) and that lead to doing some research on the concertina. I understand in broad terms the different key arrangements and the terms unisonoric/bisonoric of the English, Anglo and Duet systems. Here is my question: as a pianist and music reader will I make faster progress with which system? What do you think will be more intuitive and therefore I will be able to manage the learning curve in order to make music? I'm eager to hear your responses. McDouglas in Dallas
  12. wrong note Pete

    Lachenal Bass For Spares

    I plan to offer my Lachenal double acting bass for sale on e-bay in a few days. Unfortunately, this instrument has been mutilated by the attempt of a previous owner a long time ago to add some extra notes. I did have hopes of re-working it to original format but have finally concluded that the damage is too great to repair. It is short of quite a few lower note reeds and valve pads but the bellows are good and the main structure elements are useable. Accordingly, it is to be offered as spares rather than a restoration project and is mentioned on this forum to reach as wide an audience as possible for what is probably quite a rare instrument and consequent spares interest. Thanks for any interest.
  13. Hello again everyone. I've been out of the loop for almost five years, so I guess that means I'm new here again, and those of you who've forgotten me can meet me for the first time a second time! I was able to go to the Old Pal event once back in 2012 with my Jackie, and since then I've been busy with a multitude of things. But enough about that. In regards to my Jackie, I find that the bellows are very stiff in comparison with other (vintage / higher price tiered) concertinas, and I was wondering if anyone had a suggestion or two about how I can get the bellows to limber up without causing undue wear on them. Also, occasionally the "low C" on the instrument has a buzz, like there's something stuck and vibrating between the valve and the air aperture, but I keep the instrument in the gig bag 99.5% of the time when I'm not actively practicing. Would I gain anything by opening up that side just to see if there's a speck of anything caught in the works? Lastly, I am finding myself in a situation where I will be needing to learn Anglo for occasional Celtic / ITM work. When going from English to Anglo, are there any keysets that lend themselves more to someone relearning the wheel? I figured that bisonorous bellows action would be the first stumbling block, as opposed to the unisonorous bellows action that I'm used to with the English. Thanks in advance for any insight that can be offered, and thank all you fine folks for still being around!
  14. I'm just curious about what other English concertina players do when it comes to playing in keys where your fingers could choose one of the two same-sounding notes, like C# or Db, G# or Ab, etc.. I was playing something in the key of C# this morning, a simple tune, and if I was 'correct' and strict about what note to play, I had to consciously be careful to choose a d# (d sharp) when I encountered that note. What my fingers naturally wanted to play was actually the eb (e flat). At least in this case. I know it doesn't really make a difference, as far as how it sounds. And I'm guessing that if I were playing something very classical or complex, I'd probably find it more normal to play 'correctly.' But, with a simple tune, I find that my fingers just want to balance the distribution of buttons between my left and my right hand. Any thoughts on this?
  15. I am selling my Treble Crabb English concertina, serial 18081, as i don't play it so often anymore. I bought it new around 1966 from H. Crabb himself. in those days he offered aluminum sides instead of the fancy cutted chrome ones at a slightly lower price, nevertheless the sound is still fabulous and tuning is fine. All reeds, leathers etc. are too, with no rust on reeds or mold and the instrument is not leaky, just as Mr Crabb told me then it would be for at least 20 years to come if i kept it away from moist, cleaned the bellow folds at times, and warm it up coming in from the cold especially, to avoid condense settling on the reeds etc. before playing. In the past i took it to gigs and used in theater circumstances, so it shows some signs of wear, but no damages apart from light scratches etc. I'm looking for a fair price offer, and then maybe a deal. PS the original case is present, in good condition, but has stickers on it. Location The Hague, Netherlands.
  16. Carrick Hornpipe performed by Lea Nicholson (English concertina) and Naomi Randall (guitar). This tune was originally written for the Northumbrian Smallpipes by the legendary smallpipe player Billy Pigg
  17. Back-to-back video of both models playing a popular tune. The Aeola is c 1909 with original 5-fold bellows and is in original old pitch. The Model 5 from 1918 has a new set of bellows I made and installed recently. It is in modern pitch. I restored both instruments over the past 12 months. The video is here:
  18. Samples of concertina video posted to YouTube in the last few weeks: Irish Concertina Ensemble http://youtu.be/8jChmNlajIY Baritone Treble English Concertina - Michael Pierceall http://youtu.be/Ias4-jXhT2M Howard Cairnes - Adios Alistair http://youtu.be/vH5cqX68jzw Sailor's Hornpipe - very nice rendition on a student model instrument http://youtu.be/FUWLjWRAbLs
  19. JoRiemer

    My Tune Of The Week 1

    In the last year I explored a lot of Danish and North German tunes. Wonderful music that is working in the same style as English ceilidh music. So my project is: Learning every week a new of these English, Danish or North German tunes by heart. Here is the link for the first week played on my Chemnitzer: https://www.dropbox.com/s/zyuohlagww0h3ik/Trekant%20No15-%20Den%20gamle%20Mand.m4a?dl=0
  20. A couple of months back I built a new bellows for an old Lachenal 48-button English concertina, and I think it came out rather well. I used the methods outline on the Homewood site, and my thanks goes out to Bob Tedrow for his excellent instructions. The bellows that were on my squeezebox were not originals, and they were functional but very ugly. Finding the papers was difficult, but the ones I got from Concertina Connection worked out fine. I'll attach a couple of pictures for your inspection. Ben
  21. Has anyone noticed eBay item # 132025131856 ? (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/old-LACHENAL-CONCERTINA-ACCORDION-39-keys-English-Make-patent-No-4752/132025131856?_trksid=p2050601.c100607.m4280&_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D37140%26meid%3Dac9066a2bc99434fa44977d076f34489%26pid%3D100607%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D4%26sd%3D322114455891) The seller says that there are buttons missing; but that doesn't seem to be correct. There are the same number of buttons as there are valves. But the buttons seem to have come from an older English concertina and have been arranged in random fashion (or latterly wrongly positioned) into a cut-down McCann. Anyone have any comments?
  22. Howdy All- I'm a complete and utter beginner with this whole concertina thing (totaly playing time so far about 1 hour) so I joined this forum to learn from you all. Glad to meet you all. I've got me a brand new Jackie and hope to get the barest rudiments of playing it down eventually I learn best via negative feedback and have the scars to prove it so please feel free to beat me about the head and shoulders when I need it. Which brings me to the "Neanderthal" part of the thread title. About 1/2 my bones are diagnostically Neanderthal according to paleoanthropologists and my brain seems to work the old way, too. Just as Uncle Neanderthal chipped his rocks the same way for a quarter million years, and was considered avante garde by Grandpa Erectus who was stuck in his ways for over 1 million years, I have neither imagination nor capacity for innovation. But I know a good idea when I see one.so slavishly copy the inventions of today's new-fangled H. sapiens in my crude, unskilled manner. You could classify me as a Chateperronian Neanderthal, I guess. I have a bit of history with musical instruments. I played trombone all through school (and haven't touched it since), taught myself a tiny bit of harmonica (but had severe problems with the inhale/exhale thing), utterly failed at the bagpipe due to being left-handed, and reached my Neanderthal physical finger and mental creativity limits with a Stratocaster, I have never been able to make sense out of a piano and have a 1-(MIDI)-track mind anyway. But I can type 60 words per minute, learned on a manual typewriter. Thus, of all types of concertina, I seem most suited to the English, so I'm going to give that a go. Anyway, I look forward to this adventure and hoipe to learn much from you all.
  23. I started to discuss this particular instrument by posting on the topic 'New Reeds or Re-Tune'. But since re re-tuning of an English is really a different topic to re tuning for a key change, I thought I'd better start a new topic. I thought this old concertina (S/N 32159) was in Old Philharmonic pitch (A=452), however I measured it last night and it seems that whilst a few of the sharps/flats do seem to be at this pitch, most of the most of the notes seem to be well flat by 20 to 40 cents... Is this to be expected on an old instrument which has not been never been re tuned? I tried different pitches on the tuner and discovered that a note which is 30 cents flat at A=452, is only 10 cents sharp at A=440. In other words the concertina seems to be actually closer to modern concert pitch, than it is to the old pitch standard... I am still unsure as to how to re tune it, do I take it up to A=452, or down to A=440??? Please can anyone advise? Tuning chart attached
  24. Fumblefingers

    Lachenal Paragon 48 Key English For Sale

    For sale simply because it's not being played and needs a new home. Paragon model, rosewood ends, metal keys, steel reeds; in excellent condition and well tuned at concert pitch. The very clean interior would suggest that this instrument has not had a lot of use since it was made, probably around 1914, but Lachenals are not straightforward to date. Tuned and re-valved by Andrew Norman. Comes with original rosewood box, but don't keep it in this as it holds the instrument the wrong way up! Therefore, also comes with a modern hard case. A sweet instrument - looking for £1100. Photos are available by e-mail but too large to post here!
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