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Found 11 results

  1. EDIT: okay, I have been convinced that I'm being too cheap. After a little more research it looks like something like a Stagi 20b is probably what I'm looking for, something like that to start out. I can push my budget up to about $200 if anyone has a solid reliable little thing they are trying to upgrade from. Y'all are some pretty helpful people, I have to say. Lots of great advice I really appreciate. I'm trying to be a little more patient so I can find a decent instrument. I am totally new to concertinas, but I want one to play in my history classes for students and to play with family at family gatherings. I am looking for something really cheap - like $100 or less range cheap, something I can get started on. I'm fine with an old Italian or German beater just so I can get started while I learn more and save for a better instrument. As long as it works and I can get started on it. I am in Texas. Thank you!
  2. So I finally made up my mind to get a squeezebox for song accompaniment. I've never played one before, so I figured out an Anglo would be the easiest choice for a folksy beginner. However, I'm still in doubt whether I should opt for a 20-button or a 30-button model. To be more precise: I'm aiming for good old folklore sound - think Peter Bellamy, A.L.Lloyd , Roy Harris etc., shanties, ballads and all that. Nothing fancy, just some basic accompaniment. Also, I'm a woman with a rather high-pitched voice, and I'm mostly planning to accompany myself but could do with a small band (say, a concertina, a tin whistle and two singers). What would you recommend? 20 or 30? Thank you very much in advance.
  3. Howdy All- I'm a complete and utter beginner with this whole concertina thing (totaly playing time so far about 1 hour) so I joined this forum to learn from you all. Glad to meet you all. I've got me a brand new Jackie and hope to get the barest rudiments of playing it down eventually I learn best via negative feedback and have the scars to prove it so please feel free to beat me about the head and shoulders when I need it. Which brings me to the "Neanderthal" part of the thread title. About 1/2 my bones are diagnostically Neanderthal according to paleoanthropologists and my brain seems to work the old way, too. Just as Uncle Neanderthal chipped his rocks the same way for a quarter million years, and was considered avante garde by Grandpa Erectus who was stuck in his ways for over 1 million years, I have neither imagination nor capacity for innovation. But I know a good idea when I see one.so slavishly copy the inventions of today's new-fangled H. sapiens in my crude, unskilled manner. You could classify me as a Chateperronian Neanderthal, I guess. I have a bit of history with musical instruments. I played trombone all through school (and haven't touched it since), taught myself a tiny bit of harmonica (but had severe problems with the inhale/exhale thing), utterly failed at the bagpipe due to being left-handed, and reached my Neanderthal physical finger and mental creativity limits with a Stratocaster, I have never been able to make sense out of a piano and have a 1-(MIDI)-track mind anyway. But I can type 60 words per minute, learned on a manual typewriter. Thus, of all types of concertina, I seem most suited to the English, so I'm going to give that a go. Anyway, I look forward to this adventure and hoipe to learn much from you all.
  4. Hello. I am very interested in learning to play the concertina. My main reasons for learning are that I like the traditional styles of music that are played on it, and the sound in general, and also because it would be a small, portable, and versatile instrument. (And it's cool. ) The problem I have run into is figuring out what kind I want to learn. I'm sure that is a very common question among beginners, but I haven't been able to find the answers to my exact questions on here, so I'm posting this in hopes someone can help. I've done a fair bit of research but the internet has reached the limits of its efficacy. I am at the point where I need a real person with knowledge to answer specific questions, and I've had absolutely no luck finding anybody who knows anything about concertinas locally. (I live in Corvallis, Oregon, USA. Apparently concertinas are not big in the Northwest...) I have played piano for about 18 years (since I was 6) so I am very familiar with music, can sight read very well, and I am very determined to learn, so I am not anticipating any troubles regarding the actually learning or playing of the concertina (beyond the normal learning curve of any new instrument.) So differences that effect ease of learning are not my main concern. I have ruled out Anglo concertinas, for various reasons. So I am looking at English or Duet. My main goal is to have the most options as to what styles of music I can play. Though to be realistic, especially in the short run, the most likely music I will be playing (and one of the main things I want to be able to play) is traditional hymns. (If I get to the point where I can sit down and play hymns out of my hymnal for myself or even to accompany singing I will consider that success.) From my research I had settled on the duet probably being the best fit for me, since it seems to be designed to easily play melodies and harmonies/chords (ideal for hymn playing). But I ran into the problems of cost and availability. I had decided that I could handle the cost of the Elise Hayden Duet from Concertina Connection, but then I realized that it is not chromatic. (I'm a pianist, so I'm having trouble dealing with the limitations of not having every note at my disposal!) How does one deal with that? Would you really just have to transpose any songs into the keys you have and hope there are no accidentals?? Is it possible to find chromatic duet concertinas that are not in the thousands of dollars range? Or there is the option of an English concertina. From what I can find they tend to be more available/less expensive. And at least the version from Concertina Connection is fully chromatic. I guess it boils down to this, which is more limiting to versatility: a duet concertina that is not fully chromatic, or an English concertina's layout? At first I had thought that English concertinas were not well suited to something like hymn playing, but they were very big with the Salvation Army, so obviously they work with hymns. So is it possible but just more difficult to play melody and harmony/chords on English (leading to the development of the duet) or did they mostly just play melodies if they were solo and play in a concertina band if they wanted harmony? Also, if I am starting with a less expensive concertina with fewer keys is it difficult to switch in the future to a larger concertina? i.e. Should I wait and invest in a concertina with a larger range to start with, or does it make no difference? Do forgive this novella I've just written... This is why I really need an actual human person who knows stuff to talk to; there are many variables and probably some that I don't even know about yet... Hopefully my dilemma is understandable and my questions do not sound silly. Grateful to anyone still reading, Rachel
  5. morrisminor

    Which Concertina To Buy?

    My daughter (17) thinks she would like to learn the concertina. She is not the most musical person in the world but she does play the guitar. Which is the easiest type of concertina for a novice to play. She probably would play it as a solo instrument. We are in west London.
  6. Hi everyone! I´m a new member of this great Forum. I felt in love with concertinas after hearing Jon Boden a couple months ago. Since then I have been trying different concertinas. I think I have settle down in the English System. I had an Anglo Rochelle and I just didn´t feel comfortable with the diatonic feature. The size of the Rochelle was also a problem for me. Now I have two EC. One is an old Bastari and the other one is a Louis Lachenal. Would you help me date this Lachenal? From what I have learned online 1865 is my best guess. The serial number is 14.228. Here are the pics: Thank you so much! cheers from Argentina
  7. Hello all. I was directed here from another forum. I expressed my interest in finding a good cheap concertina to knock about on and they directed me to both the 20 button anglo and this fine board. I understand that that model is a bit limited, but due to how likely it seems that I will be able to get one within my budget and how easy it should be as a starter instrument I think it is a good fit. It also seems to be the perfect fit for the sort of music I'm interested in playing. Sea chantys, fiddle tunes, backup to a few drinking songs, that sort of thing. From what I understand I could then move on to a quality 20 button or even upgrade to a 30 button without having to relearn much if I ever feel the need. On the subject of budget I can potentially go as high as $200, but if at all possible I'm hoping to find something a bit cheaper. Thanks for taking the time to check out my request.
  8. I am selling a Hohner C48 2 x 24 button english concertina - rarely played. As I hardly find the time to play this english concertina, it searches a good house where it will be played and not just be stored in its gig bag. Details: Wooden ends - A suitable beginners instrument It is in concert pitch, it has 48 white keys - playing smoothly and sounding okay on push and pull. It has an air release key. The bellows is air tight. The condition is very good - like it just left the factory, the Hohner gig bag is included Shop price is 400 UK pounds. Asking 200 pounds. PM me if you want pictures or if you're interested to buy Marien
  9. Hello! So here's my story: I have always loved Irish music. I recently crossed paths with a great Irish flute player who inspired me to give Irish music a shot. We discussed different types of instruments that I could learn, and he seemed really excited about the concertina. To be honest, I didn't even know what that was, so I spent the next several hours online watching the concertina in action on YouTube. Needless to say, I immediately decided that I wanted to play one. Now I want to make sure I'm on the right path: From perusing different forums around the web, the general consensus is that one needs to invest a little money in a decent instrument to start out with, and concertinaconnection.com came up in several discussions. I checked out their starter models and listened to various players on those three models (Jackie/Jack english, Rochelle anglo, and Elise duet). Does anyone have any personal opinions or experience with these models? My second question is in regards to which style to pursue. I've read lots of discussions on this very question, so I hope I don't open a can of worms here. I've been playing classical piano for about 15 years, and the button layout of the duet system seems to make the most sense to me because of the parallel nature of the fingerings (like playing two mini piano keyboards on their sides). Any thoughts? Is it also reasonable to assume that I would be able to play various styles (including Irish) on a duet system? I've heard people playing classical music on english systems, can duets do the same? Ok, I think that's all of my questions for now. Thanks for any help/advice!
  10. Hello, My name is Dave and I have recently taken an interest in the concertina. I'm hoping that this forum might be a good place to meet friendly folks who are enthusiastic and knowledgable about this very unique little instrument. I have yet to purchase a concertina of my own. I am still in the research phase. I do have some prior background in music. Mostly, I play guitar and ukulele. I also play piano and tenor sax to a lesser degree. Still, I feel like I'm searching for my holy grail instrument. An instrument that is portable like the ukulele, but not as quiet. An instrument where melody notes can be be played with a lot of sustain like with an electric guitar, but without the need to drag an amplifier around. An instrument that excels at playing both melody and accompanyment simultaneously like a piano, but which can be easily picked up and brought outside to play in the back yard. An instrument that can be very expressive like the saxophone. I think that the concertina may well be my holy grail instrument. Now that I've begun focusing on the concertina, I've become aware of how many variations there are. In a word, MANY. I am hoping that perhaps some of you folks who have been on the concertina path might be able to share some guidance and tips to help get me started on my journey. So far, I think I've narrowed it down to the English style concertina. Most of the music I play, I figure out by ear/memory. So I would want an instrument capable of playing in any key. I understand that the Anglo instruments are more limited as to which keys one can play in. Also, I think that the concertinas, which play two different notes on the same button depending on whether you are squeezing or pulling the bellows, would make things more complicated for me. But, obviously, I cannot say from personal experience. So I was wondering if some of you might introduce yourselves and tell me which sorts or concertinas you prefer and why. I am excited and curious to see what the concertina community is like and I'm anxious to learn as much as I can about this instrument. Thanks! Go Cat Dave
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