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  1. Edgley professional C/G Anglo #539, jeffries system. Tuned and modded with leather gaskets below the end-plates, since the buttons were sticking out about 3 mm too much, IMO a slight design problem. The buttons had too much sideways moving space and felt not right during fast playing. Not anymore now ! Fast responding and loud instrument, i played a few Anglo and English brands and this would be quite a fav for gigs. Only selling because of the wife complaining that it's too loud and i want to keep her happy .... PS EU import duties have been paid for, 1900 Euros. 20% less if sold outside the European Union, like the UK or USA. Shipping to UK and USA can be expensive; due corona delays i would recommend UPS or DHL. Leather covered sturdy case included.
  2. Hi guys, I’m considering taking up Anglo concertina, mainly with the desire to play Irish tunes etc. My background is in piano/pipe organ, but I do also play B/C Irish button accordion. Recently I’ve become more and more enchanted by the sweet single reed sound of the conc, and I think I will pick it up quickly due to my experience with another bisonoric instrument. I don’t own a concertina yet. My concern is that my hands are quite large. They are not overly wide but I have long and skinny fingers. On a piano I can easily reach an 11th interval (eg C1 to F2). On a standard 30 button 3 row concertina, I’m worried that I would have to curl my fingers too much to reach the inside row and that my hands would cramp - this could have an effect on my speed and accuracy of playing. The other issue is that I live in Brisbane, Australia and there are literally no music stores which sell concertinas so I don’t even have the opportunity to play one or hold one to see what the spacing and comfort is like. Of course if anyone here lives in Brisbane and would be happy for me to have a look at their concertina that would be great! Any advice anyone has would be greatly appreciated. Are there any other large-handed Anglo players out there? Am I wasting my time learning and should I just stick to diatonic accordion? Any suggestions or a good intermediate starter instrument better suited to larger hands? And out of curiosity what is the distance between the palm rest and the inner most row of buttons? Thank you so much, Andrew (excited newbie)
  3. Seth Hamon Professional with Voci a Mano reeds. C/G 30 button Wheatstone layout. 7-fold bellows! Very light and fast player, very well made; alas selling since i recently bought a traditionally built and quite expensive one. Instrument is in as new state. Bellows smell that way LoL. Due 450 Euro EU import duties that have been paid (mainly VAT charges) it makes sense for a buyer within the EU. No import duties then. Price 1900 Euros. BTW I stopped with paypal, it's a scam these days. Tip: get a free money wiring subscription with WISE.com or Intarem, and pay by Mastercard or Visa: You're off far cheaper for eventual exchange-rates and your money transfer is secure and almost immediate. Economy EU insured parcel shipping is around 70 euro's, Fedex is faster but more expensive. Case included. PM me if you live outside the EU, as i can probably get VAT back when exported again within a few months, and thus sell depending location about 19% cheaper. For US buyers i will include a COO form to avoid paying import duties. At costs of approx 100 euro's extra i can arrange a conversion to jeffries system layout, using 4 new Voci a Mano reeds. This will take about 10 days before shipping out.
  4. I've got an old East German Scholer Concertina with leaky bellows. It seams like the leaks are at the corner fabric parts. Could it be that the fabric is no longer air-proof? And if so, is there something I can paint on it to make it air-proof? I've had a look at "Coghlans Airstop", which is actually made for PVC products, but I doubt it will work. I've tried opening up the ends to look inside the bellows, but after unscrewing the ends, the part containing the reeds are stapled/nailed in place. So I can't see the inside of the bellows. Does anyone have any advice for repair, or is it advisable to completely replace the bellows? I'm trying to see if there is a cheap fix, rather than complete bellows replacement, which could be costly. I live in South Africa and I know Danie Labuschagne can replace the bellows. I'm just trying to see what other options there are
  5. Beautiful, mostly unused Frank Edgley 186 Anglo Concertina. Practiced on a separate one, so this rarely sees daylight. (Actually, neither see daylight) 586 four nine one 4858 or, slower response to idontcheckitbutits@hotmail.com Metro Detroit area
  6. Hi All, I am selling a Jefrries concertina. This instrument is in the key of Bb/F. It requires tuning. I have put a new set of hand straps on. I am asking €5,500 euro If anybody has any questions or needs any information feel free to ask. Based outside Dublin. Patrick
  7. Hi, One of the springs on my Anglo broke last night when I was practicing. When I opened it up the spring was broken off in the hole it sits in and I can’t get it out to be replaced with a new one. I’ve tried getting it out with a pointy nose pliers, but there isn’t enough of it showing to grip to pull it out. I have two questions that hopefully someone can help with, it would be very much appreciated. Any ideas on how to get the broken end of the spring out of its hole? Can a new spring be placed beside where the old hole is? Would it be pushed in or is a hole drilled before placing the spring end into the hole? Or how does one go about it? Thanks for any and all help!
  8. This is a short review of the book 'There was None of this Lazy Dancing' by Bob Ellis. The book is about the music played at dances in the Yorkshire Dales. There are a lot of good (folk) tune books. There is a smaller but significant number of books dealing with the social history of (folk) music. There are very few books which deal with both the music and the social history of the music. This book is a significant addition to that small sub-genre. The book is a collection of tunes played at dances in the Yorkshire Dales. The tunes are presented in a way which describes and discusses their use by placing them in the context of the social events at which the tunes were played, and by using short biographies of some of the musicians who played the music. It is an absolutely splendid mix of academic rigour, relevance and readability. The tunes themselves are a mix of the familiar and the not-so-familiar. Where necessary, tunes in 'unfriendly' keys are also supplied in transpositions to a 'friendly' key (usually G, so the tunes should be easily accessible to G/D and C/G concertina players?). The book is also well-illustrated and well made (hard cover, stitched signatures, lay-flat binding). The fortunate purchaser of the book will also receive a password giving access to ABC transcriptions of all the tunes. The author asks, (very reasonably), that this password not be passed on to those who have not purchased the book. The ABC code appears to be of original transcriptions by the author. The style of coding is consistent, concise (minimalist, if you prefer), unambiguous and correct. As with the printed text, where the original of the tune was in an 'unfriendly' key, the author has provided a transcription into a 'friendly' key. In brief, this is a superb book! The only irritating thing about the book is that there is a picture of the author on page 5. I'm sure I know the man from somewhere, and can't for the life of me remember where or when I encountered him. Bloody infuriating!
  9. a musical sign of life - a spontaneous live recording (first take) after having set up a decent audio recorder for my smartphone https://soundcloud.com/blue-eyed-sailor/kolomtanz-sailors-hornpipe as always, any comments are appreciated. edited to add: playing my model 24 Wheatstone EC here
  10. I have Lachenal concertina with a number 2435 it has 21 buttons on one side and 19 on the other it is still in its original box, which unfortunately requires some attention. can anyone please date this and give me an idea as to it’s value.
  11. Vintage early 20th century Concertina for sale. Hello everybody, I have a fantastic German diatonic concertina which needs a little of care, while button levers are detached on the left side and the handle needs to be fixed. Music enthusiasts will definitely know what the potential of this instrument is. I'll be happy to send more pictures to anyone interested. I have fully working accordeons available as well. regards MM
  12. Although this is primarily accordion focused, the concertina has a brief presence. I've included this video here not so much for its limited concertina content as for the fascinating window it provides into the world of bellows driven free reed instruments and some perspective on their many forms. It's dated 2009, somehow I missed it then but Martin Donohoe of Cavan (Ireland) recently posted a link to it elsewhere that brought it to my attention today. Behind the Bellows
  13. I am selling my 4-CD set, “300 Gems of Irish Music for All Instruments,” for only $4.99 USD. See https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/300-gems-recordings-mp3s-or-set-of-4-cds/. This price is good through January 6, 2020. All my Irish music books and most of my CDs are also heavily discounted. For all the info, go to: https://greylarsen.com/webstore/holiday-cd-book-sale/. This audio collection is a companion to my book “300 Gems of Irish Music for All Instruments.” (See https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/300-gems-of-irish-music-for-all-instruments/). All 300 tunes are notated in the book. Free excerpts are available as PDF downloads (at http://greylarsen.com/webstore/books/). Many of the transcriptions pay homage to recordings by great musicians and groups such as Matt Molloy, Martin Hayes, Sharon Shannon, Mary Bergin, Kevin Burke, James Kelly, Willie Clancy, Altan, the Bothy Band and the Mulcahy Family, as well as early 20th century recordings from revered masters Michael Coleman, Paddy Killoran, Dennis Murphy, Bobby Casey, Paddy Canny and others. The tunes are notated in a style that makes them equally accessible to players of fiddle, flute, whistle, accordion, concertina, harp, keyboard, guitar, mandolin, banjo, uilleann pipes – to all melody players. I play the tunes on Irish flute, tin whistle, and 49 of the tunes on my Wheatstone 12-sided anglo concertina from the 1930s. This is an excellent resource for repertoire building and makes a nice gift. Also, I designed the tune sequence such that good medleys result when you play consecutive tunes one after another. (At least I think so.) To buy only the 49 concertina tunes, go here: https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/49-concertina-tunes-from-300-gems-of-irish-music-for-all-instruments/. For $9.99, you can get the same collection as 300 downloadable mp3s, and save shipping costs. This costs less than getting the CDs if you are in Canada, Mexico or outside of North America. The mp3s can be found here: https://greylarsen.com/shop/product/300-gems-recordings-mp3s-or-set-of-4-cds/. The CD set is so inexpensive because I have piles of them on my shelves! Time to move them out into the world. I make no profit at this price, but I have the pleasure of spreading the music around. Most of my CDs are also on sale at 40% off. And all my books are reduced as well. See https://greylarsen.com/webstore/holiday-cd-book-sale/. Thank you for your attention, and happy holidays! - Grey
  14. New arrival now for sale - a fine condition TANZBAR automatic player concertina. These were made in Leipzig, Germany with most dating between 1900 & the 1930's. This instrument takes some musical & muscular coordination to get the best results, but it's loads of fun once you get the hang of it. And, its just in time for it to be a fabulous Holiday gift for your 'loved' one. Plus, this one comes with 40 original paper music rolls & a newly made roll rewind crank. Price - $1200.- plus shipping, which can be estimated if you forward me your address & zip. Shipment would be made immediately after payment is received (Paypal) &/or cleared if by CK. Our contact - amltd-at-voicenet.com Take a look at the video made today: https://youtu.be/MmPBhKPG8GM Thanks, Jere R.
  15. Does anyone know anything about the brand Toneking made in Germany concertina? I am able to find any information during my searches. https://wowauctionsite.hibid.com/catalog/186124/ft--myers-online-auction-bid-close-10-17-19/?cpage=2
  16. Hello, I want to try a duet concertina, but it is difficult to get an instrument. I searched on the Internet but, these are very expensive. So I am looking for A for beginners as cheap as possible. I don't care about the system, because I'm about to begin. I'm sorry for not being good at speaking English.
  17. This concertina was purchased by Ken Shaw from Chris Timson, webmaster of concertina.info (?), in 2006. It had been renovated a couple of years prior by Chris Algar, who sold it to Chris Timson. Ken Shaw met Greg Jowaisas around 2012 at a festival in Texas and showed him the Lachenal. Greg told Ken it was the best model Lachenal made and agreed that he could make a better bellows. He replaced the bellows and straps with gorgeous dark green leather, did work on the pads, valves, and springs and tightened up the action and added bushings around the buttons. He also added the gold leaf decoration on the sides. In Ken’s words, “When it came back, the new bellows had improved everything! The buttons worked better and the tone had improved due to the tighter air plumbing. Noel Hill told me it was the best Lachenal he had seen!” No serial number is visible, but Ken told me it’s about 100 yrs old. It has a very sweet, warm, woodsy sound. There is some damage (and repair that can be seen from the inside) to the rosewood fretwork, but it seems solid. The bellows still needs to be “played in” (per my conversation with Greg Jowaisas), as Ken has not played it much in the last couple of years. There is a tiny screw missing in the middle of one face. I have only owned it for a couple of months, as I lucked into a Jeffries, which I have been playing almost exclusively. Price: $2700 + shipping, insurance, etc. I am in Pasadena, CA. Primrose Lass Lachenal - 9:25:19, 8.41 PM.mp3
  18. I am looking for a Crane concertina with a chevron layout of the buttons – rather than the curved Butterworth set up. I have a large Crabb Crane with 67 buttons with the chevron layout (see picture) but it’s not very portable due to its size. I am looking to buy a second, smaller Crane with the same layout with between 42 & 55 buttons. My preference would be for a Crabb (or Wheatstone, if they ever made them) but would be interested to see what is available. If you have such a Crane that you are looking to sell, please get in touch. My preference would be to buy from the UK but I'm open to purchasing from abroad. Peter
  19. My collection of miniature figures playing concertina has to go with our downsize. I would like to sell and have put on eBay, but pleased to give to any good home plus postal costs.
  20. OK, so I just became the proud parent (servant?) of a Hohner 20-button C/G concertina. I want to play pirate songs and Irish session tunes. Ordered Gary Coover's books on Amazon. Any other advice for the beginning player? I play stringed instruments mostly, with a bit of drum and other miscellaneous, but mostly I'm a singer. So I do have some musical experience, but the concertina mystifies me. Watched some YouTube videos where they basically said, "Yeah, these buttons seem to be arranged randomly, but I have no idea why." Any guidance appreciated.
  21. Two workshops in Nottingham on May 11th. Further details on flyer below. concertinaworkshop- with biog.docx
  22. Beautiful tortoise shell 51 key Wheatstone aeola for sale. Just overhauled by the Button Box. Comes with original case. Smooth action, in tune, concert pitch, 6 fold bellows very tight. Serial Number 33234. Many inside photos upon request. Located north of Boston. david at davidcoffin dot com Will donate an appropriate amount to concertina.net.
  23. Hi all, My first time posting here! My name is Caitlín Nic Gabhann and I'm a concertina player from Ireland. I came on here because I've just launched a new website for learning the concertina online and I wanted to let you all know about it! There's a complete Starter Course on the website now - you can take the lessons any time you want, in your own home. Each lesson features: -- A video, and audio (both of which you can 'loop' a section for repeating - very handy for when you want to just repeat a particular phrase. Also - these are slow-downable) -- Staff and ABC notation (which you can download and print) -- Tips on technique from me (eg: which high D' to use) -- Notes on the Story behind the tune and more... There are also many other features on the website, such as suggested listening, tips if buying a concertina and. a free sample lesson. Here is the website so you can check it out: www.IrishConcertinaLessons.com - I recommend trying the free lesson to see if it's for you. I plan on adding an Improvers Course and an Advanced Course in 2019. Let me know what you think, Kindest regards, Caitlín
  24. Teaching Anglo concertina lessons at home and on skype all over the globe has been a continuing pleasure. My students come to me for a variety of reasons and I try to figure out just what they need to get the most out of the customized lessons I offer. A recent example... Some friends of mine in the theater recommended me to Doug Shapiro. He asked me to teach him how to play a few concertina songs for a theater production, now in rehearsal. He described it as “an audience immersion Avant-Garde show” ... well alright! His theater company had bought him a pretty little vintage red East German Anglo 20 button box for $50 off ebay. Doug fondly named it “Tchotchke Rosie” but he had no idea how to play it. Doug is an actor and singer with a high school level of musical training. He sent me three guitar and vocal audio recordings of proposed original songs. I agreed to meet him for a lesson at my studio here in Brooklyn, New York, to help him join the band for his new show. I thought that this effort was unlikely to work out, given the limitations of a 20 button ebay instrument, but you never know. When I tried his “Tchotchke Rosie” I was in despair. So crude, so out of tune and a high D/A tuning to boot. I told him that it was unlikely this junk box concertina would work, but I would give it a try and started in playing along with the audio tracks on his red junker. Amazing! It sounded pretty good and the keys they were playing in made the D/A box actually easier than a C/G would ever be. I made him some paper arrangements on the spot and sent him home to practice. A few days later, Doug had done his homework and could plausibly play complex chords along with the recordings. He impressed his fellow thespians in rehearsal and they decided that Doug should sing and play solo for some additional intermission entertainment. His plan, he told me, was to sing a few well known Christmas songs... in Yiddish. Oy vay! Sounds strange, but that’s what they are into. Apparently, Doug has done this sort of thing before, though he’s not Jewish and does not speak Yiddish. Check out his performance of the country classic “Your Cheating Heart.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLkV_QO8fqE So now, I have had a few more lessons with Doug and he’s a natural concertina player. He knows how to deliver a song, and for him, the concertina just fits right in without effort. I’ve just made him charts for “Walking In a Winter Wonderland” and “Feliz Navidad.” I’m sure he will do fine, singing his Yiddish translations of these fine Christmas classics.
  25. When you're overwhelmed, sometimes things stay in your subconscious for a while before resurfacing. This happened to me at the recent Noel Hill concertina school in Cincinnati, and what just bubbled up from my unconscious turns out to be something I"ll probably value the rest of my concertina playing life. This is what is bubbling up now. At some point, Noel corrected the way I was holding the instrument...on my right thigh. He suggested I change it to my left thigh, because the air-button hand -- the right hand -- is the "bowing hand" of the instrument. He made several comparisons between the fiddle and the concertina during the school, this was one that I'm really glad is coming back to me. Keeping this in mind is helping my bellows and air button work a lot, simply by giving it a frame or concept to hook it to. A simple and powerful concept.
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