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Found 4 results

  1. Hi, my daughter currently plays a 30 button C/G Lachenal (metal ends). It has one of the best tones we've heard...but she has outgrown the action. So, we're looking for a faster concertina for her. My wife and I are both school teachers, so we'd love to find a deal, but we do understand that this is an expensive instrument. Here's the non-negotiables on it: Anglo 30 button (minimum, but not much more) Concertina reeds riveted action modern maker (Suttner, 7mount, Kensington, Dipper, Carroll, Edgely Heritage, etc...probably not Irish Concertina Company unless there's a great deal) Jefferies layout (modified Jefferies, like the Kensington layout, are fine...want that C# on the push and pull) Here's the preferences: metal ends metal buttons US East Coast (there are a couple brands that we might by sight unseen, but obviously it would be better if she could try either by travelling or the ability to return) Thanks for looking. Even if you don't have one for sale, but know of someone who might, please either let me know or let them know. My daughter has really transitioned into a concertina player, not just a kid who plays concertina. After a couple years of really hard work, she's qualified for the Fleadh Cheoil na h√Čireann (U15).
  2. Carroll Concertina #278, C/G 30-button. lt is the standard size in all black with a celtic tree endplate design and adjustable handlebars. I am the original owner of this instrument, I had it built towards the end of 2019. No leaks, holes, scratches, or damage of any kind. Occasionally the endplate screws need re-tightening, but when I asked the repair folks at the Button Box they told me it was nothing to worry about and is fairly normal with new instruments. Good volume, bright tone, and fast action, if I played more I would keep her, but I don't and she's too lovely to sit around and collect dust! Asking $5800 $5500 (+shipping), comes with hard case.
  3. Hi all, I am selling 30 buttons Carroll Noel Hill Model C/G Concertina. Made by Wally in November 2014 (#1419 or 160). Standard Carroll layout, D-drone. Comes with a hard case. Just amazing instrument. Demo is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu0YTKKpFVA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6aSDLZFMb4 I am really happy with this concertina but I want to buy vintage concertina now. Price: 7000 EUR (could be discussed). Located in Moscow, Russia till the end of August. Since then I will move to Ireland (Ennis, Co. Clare or Limerick) P.S. I would be happy to swap this concertina to 30 buttons Wheatstone Linota Black or nice 30 buttons –°.Jeffries (C/G). Let me know if someone is interested.
  4. Today, I visited with Mr. Greg Jowaisas. Immediately walking in there was almost a dozen instruments set out for me to try, amongst them, Lachenal's and Jones'. Due to a bit of overwhelm and sensory overload, I was only able to take notes on a few. The first instrument I looked at was a Lachenal Anglo 20 button C/G with brass reeds. It had a sharp sound and was a bit dissonant, but not enough to be unbearably off putting. The one thing that gave me a hard time was gripping the instrument. A bit into the visit, Greg talked about the different parts of the instrument and mentioned the strap screw and then I realized "gripping" was more a trivial matter than a legitimate one. All in all, it was really simple to pick out a few tunes on, but the lack of a C# immediately turned me off. The second instrument I tried was a Lachenal Anglo 22 button C/G. I have no idea what changed in between the two systems, but I couldn't figure out the diatonic scale structure. Out of frustration, I moved on to the Anglo 30 buttons C/G's. The Rochelle was pretty sharp, and sometimes ringy, so tonally it was a little on the harsh side. But like the Lachenal, it wasn't so bad that it hurt. I was quite impressed with it. To answer my own question, no it did not sound like a toy. What I didn't like was how the buttons didn't really have a stopping point when pushing them, like the springs didn't have enough tension. Given it's an entry level instrument it's shortcomings were obvious and expected. There wasn't enough wrong with it to turn me off so I will officially be starting on the Rochelle. The steel reeded Jones's were really nice. They had a very warm and mellow tone compared to the brass reeded boxes. I liked them a lot. I also got to try a Carroll. It was absolutely lovely. It was very comfortable and smooth to the touch. I loved the feel of the metal buttons and it's bellows were very light. It's tone was bright but very controlled. It is a wonderful instrument. I walked in not expecting to learn a single tune, but I picked up this system very quickly. It was much simpler than I expected. I'm no longer intimidated by the Anglo being bisonoric and I'm actually quite fond of it now. Over the time I was there I managed to pick out a jig and a reel: Joe Cooley's Jig(The Bohola) and The Little Bag of Spuds. I didn't get them down-pat, but I was impressed with what I could work out in such a short time. I also tried out an English, just to give it a fair chance and to experience for myself it's "apparent" intuitiveness... First off, I have no idea why it's the recommended concertina for pianists. It's alternating pitch structure wasn't very logical to me and it's unisonoricness didn't help it's case at all. As embarrassing as it is, I admit I couldn't manage to even figure out the D scale. I couldn't find the F#! It was so frustrating and humbling, Greg brought out a fiddle for me to play so I could recover. I say all this in good humor but the English is not for me. He also showed us a baritone Duet concertina, which was enormous and made even less sense than the English. Goodness... On the English, I couldn't find the 3rd scale degree, and on the Duet I couldn't find the 2nd! xD. It was really neat sounding though. Overall, the concertinas were all wonderful. They do small acoustic instruments proud with their loudness, but they weren't too loud. Those that were bright weren't too sharp. Those that were warm weren't too muted or stale. A few did have a clarinet thing going on with their tone, and that baritone duet could've passed for a... well... Baritone(brass). But the rest of them did have a special and distinct tone. I'm so glad I got to feel and hear them live on my own knee. In between the concertinas, we were able to share a few tunes, a few stories, and a few laughs. He told me about different events in the area and talked about his experiences with Noel Hill. He also answered all the questions my very inquisitive friends had to ask. I would've learned a lot more if I wasn't so focused on assessing the boxes. One of my friends said, "I think I know more about the concertina than any other instrument now!" Definitely worth the trip and I look forward to continuing things with the Concertina. Thanks everyone for the recommendation and thank you very much Greg for the opportunity. You're a gentleman and a scholar! Cheers! -Jerone
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