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  1. Hi everyone! I´m a new member of this great Forum. I felt in love with concertinas after hearing Jon Boden a couple months ago. Since then I have been trying different concertinas. I think I have settle down in the English System. I had an Anglo Rochelle and I just didn´t feel comfortable with the diatonic feature. The size of the Rochelle was also a problem for me. Now I have two EC. One is an old Bastari and the other one is a Louis Lachenal. Would you help me date this Lachenal? From what I have learned online 1865 is my best guess. The serial number is 14.228. Here are the pics: Thank you so much! cheers from Argentina
  2. Appearing at May Revels Celebration at the Strathmore THE SQUEEZERS Jim Besser - Anglo Concertina Gus Voorhees - Melodeon Randy Stein - English Concertina Saturday May 4, 2014 12:30 PM and 3:00PM Free to the Public Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Ln, North Bethesda, MD 20852 http://www.revelsdc.org/events-calendar.html
  3. Traditional music duo 'Blyde Lasses' are once again bringing the sounds of Shetland to Skye, Glasgow, and Stirling this coming weekend! The pair performs traditional, contemporary and self-penned Shetland material with Frances Wilkins on English concertina and Claire White on fiddle and vocals in their story-rich concerts. Frances will be guest tutoring at this year's Swaledale Squeeze in May, and this is a chance to hear her in action prior to the event. Scottish Mini Tour Dates March 2014 Friday 21st March Shetland Night at Breakish Hall, Breakish, Isle of Skye. 7.30pm. £6/4 on the door. Free Shetland Beer tasting sponsored by Valhalla Brewery. Sunday 23rd March The Old Hairdressers, 20-28 Renfield Lane, Glasgow G2 5AR. 7.30pm. £7/5 on the door. Monday 24th March Stirling Folk Club, Stirling County R.F.C., Bridgehaugh Park, Stirling FK9 5AP. 8.00pm. £8 on door For more information please see attached posters, visit www.blydelasses.com, or contact Frances Wilkins on 07780 504930 or frances@franceswilkins.com Hope to see some of you over the weekend!
  4. About a year or so ago Jim Besser and I started playing together and found music and ways to make the anglo and the EC work nicely together. We then added the young and very talented melodeon player, Gus Vorhees and started the Squeezers. Our repertoire seems to defy categorizing as we play an eclectic selection of styles and music from genres, and time periods.. In searching YouTube I found several groups and bands that have a concertina in them or the lead is a concertina or accordion. There are groups like Rachel Hall's Concertina Orchestra, the Bootle Concertina Band and others that have more than one free reed player in the group. Also a few that have Chemitzer concertinas Like Bill Czerniak Band. So anyone else have a group of multiple free reed instruments currently performing? If so what is it, where are you, and what kind of music do you play? rss
  5. Traditional music duo 'Blyde Lasses' are once again bringing the sounds of Shetland to south-west England and Wales this coming weekend. The pair performs traditional, contemporary and self-penned Shetland material with Frances Wilkins on English concertina and Claire White on fiddle and vocals in their story-rich concerts. Frances will be guest tutoring at this year's Swaledale Squeeze in May, and this is a chance to hear her in action prior to the event. South-West Mini Tour Dates February 2014 Thursday 20th February The Lion, Caerhowel, Nr Montgomery, Powys. 8pm Friday 21st February Bodmin Folk Club, Syd’s Bar, Bodmin, Cornwall. 8pm Saturday 22nd February Shammick Acoustic, Pack o’ Cards, Combe Martin, N. Devon. 8pm Sunday 23rd February The Square and Compass, Worth Matravers, Nr Swanage, Dorset. 1.30pm. For more information please visit www.blydelasses.com If you would like further information, please contact Frances Wilkins on 07780 504930 or frances@franceswilkins.com
  6. Appearing at the Folklore Society of Greater Washington Mid-Winter Music Festival THE SQUEEZERS Jim Besser - Anglo Concertina Gus Voorhees - Melodeon Randy Stein - English Concertina Saturday Feb 08, 2014 at 5:15 PM Takoma Park Middle School (Takoma Park, MD) Event info: http://fsgw.org/myorgnet/public.php
  7. Apologies for such a newbie question. I'm learning English Concertina as my first musical instrument and trying to gain a better understanding of the accidental buttons and playing in keys other than C major/A minor. On a piano keyboard, many of the white keys have a black key on either side of them - they could be said to have both a flat and a sharp adjacent to them. On the EC keyboard, there is only one accidental adjacent to each natural. Sometimes it is a sharp, sometimes it is a flat. My question is, what is the logic behind whether a particular accidental is flat or sharp? For example, the accidental next to A is A flat. If, for the sake of argument, I wanted to play a tune in the key of B major, I would need an A sharp. I guess the answer is to use the nearest B flat key instead. Or am I missing something?
  8. A friend loaned me her Stagi 48 key English. I find it incredibly difficult to finger, eps. the lower tones. Is the Stagi a good representative of the ergonomics of the standard English concertina? 'Cuz, i'd be pretty disappointed.
  9. I'm advertising this concertina on behalf of an acquaintance in Belgium who liked the Morse Geordie Tenor concertina so much that he owned two of them. I recently bought the older model, which I'm delighted with, and he has now asked me to advertise the remaining new, unplayed model as he has moved on to other interests. Here's a link to the Belgian website on which it is advertised: http://www.2ememain.be/marche/?qq=concertina&afd=&pc_id Some bigger photos can be sent, if necessary and feel free to contact me by PM through this site if you have any questions and I'll pass them on. The asking price is €1,800 which includes insured postage within Europe and PayPal fees. This is a fair price given the current cost of a new model (see www.buttonbox.com) and then shipping and import duties into Europe. I'd like to stress that I'm doing this as a favour and have no financial interest in the sale. The owner will be handling the transaction and posting the concertina but I can vouch for his integrity. Thanks for looking. Dean
  10. I started with a Jackie four years ago, based on what I read in these forums, and I was hooked. Last year I bought my Albion treble. I kept the Jackie because I travel out of state for my job, and I keep the Jackie at my client site, so I don't risk the Albion with regular travel (and because I rapidly got spoiled with the convenience factor of not hauling the Jackie back and forth). A few months ago I started taking music lessons from a violin/mandolin/guitar player, who is astonished at finding herself teaching a concertina player but plays the kind of music I like, mainly contra dance tunes. (Concertinas are rather rare in Olympia, WA.) Now I find myself frustrated when I practice at home on the Albion and go to lessons with a Jackie. The missing accidentals and slower action are increasingly noticeable, the longer I work with my teacher. I want another concertina. Since I'm not likely to go all the way to Massachusetts anytime soon, I'm again looking to order one without having played it first. I love my Albion treble, so sticking with Morse seems a safe bet. Also, the two wheatstones I've had the privilege of playing were a lot heavier. I've read all the forum topics I could find on the Geordie and the Albion and baritones versus the higher ranges. I've listened to YouTube videos with each. I'm now rather inclined to the Geordie baritone right now. It looks like I can just play an octave lower and have the same fingering on songs I'm learning with my teacher. In some long far off future when I'm not traveling full time and would have both in the same state, having the flexibility to switch between them based on the song or who I'm playing with seems like a good thing to have. I also used to be a choir singer, and learning to accompany myself is attractive, too. Having a more mellow tone than with the treble might be good with some audiences, also. Thoughts? Recommendations?
  11. My dad has asked me to sell his 48 key Lachenal English concertina for him so here it is. Not really sure how much it's worth if I'm honest so perhaps someone can give me a bit of guidance? All the notes play cleanly and the bellows seem air tight enough. One or two valves on lower notes have a very slight flap to them. I will post a video of me playing it very badly on YouTube in the next few days (I play chromatic button boxes so don't expect too much!). The box I believe is original but has been relined - the concertina slides slowly into the box with a gentle "phfffffft" of air so it's a really really good fit. I think that's all - oh it's number 60190 and it's currently located in Bristol, UK Probably best to email me on craptiger@hotmail.com for more details.
  12. I was researching an Wheatstone concertina in the Horniman ledgers and noticed the designation "S.V." then "W.S.". Does anyone know the meaning? Thanks http://www.horniman.info/DKNSARC/SD01/PAGES/D1P0750L.HTM
  13. Hey all.... I like to spend my vacation time volunteering on tall ships. I was thinking of learning to play the concertina to entertain people during tours etc. I used to play trombone/bass back in highschool but haven't had much music experience since. I was leaning towards getting an English concertina cause it just sounded easier to play with one button doing one note reguardless of whether you're pushing or pulling but my understanding is that in the age of sail (18th/19th century) Anglo styles were commonplace on ships. Soooo, my big question is since my primary draw to concertinas is to entertain people with sea shanties on tall ships A) what kind of concertina would be most historicly accurate and are there any good song books or training videos out there specific to sea shanties/nautical music.
  14. Following on from the Aeola 64 key baritone-treble concertina, serial number 28617, that was recently sold on Ebay, I came across a link to a Canadian website with an article about concertinas. By coincindence, it happens to feature the next concertina down in the ledgers from 28617, 28618, also a 64 key baritone-treble, which has survived and is owned by someone in Canada. Both are wrongly marked in the ledgers as a model 20, which is a baritone only. It should be a model 16. There is also quite a bit on the history of concertinas, albeit with the odd mistake here and there. Quite possibly, these big Aeolas were made specially as band instruments, either for playing in concertina bands or for the Salvation Army. Here is the website address. http://www.thecanadasite.com/antiques/concertina.html Chris
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