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StephenTx

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  1. Hello from Texas. I loved you song voice and accompaniment. What type of concertina were you playing? Do you by any chance have the arrangements of "The Town I loved so Well" and/or do you know when I can get the music. The other songs were great too. Thank you for sharing and please continue to do so. Stephen Knoll, Tyler Texas aka Stephentx
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  3. John ... *blush* to say I am a classical concertinist....I am taking lessons from a classical concertinist! Pauline has taught me so much. I am able to read treble cleff (and I work hard at it the bass cleff) , learning a lot about timing and pacing but I drawing blanks on this whole chord thing. I buy music that has the guitar chords but cannot figure out how to make it work as there seems to be one or two chords for the entire measure...and I can't figure out how it works. To play the melody is boring ad to play the thirds (I believe it is called is the same). HELP is what I need I am not a music person I am in healthy care....so Im not dumb but do sem to be having block. The main purpose of why I took up the concertina was to use as vocal accompaniment. I have read what you have all posted in this thread but I am still having brain farts. (as we call them in Texas). Jim has reached out and I am going to contact him. A frustrated concertinist. StephenTx
  4. Oh my goodness, how I have enjoyed this thread. I have been active for awhile, nursing back a shattered wrist....but I am back. I am an English player have taken Skype lessons from Pauline de Sono but I am trying t get to the point of vocal accompaniment as discussed In this discussion...alot of which is over my head with the music terms.. I need some help understanding chords and how to use them to accompaniment of my voice. Do any of you do lessons via Skype? StephenTX
  5. Thank you for sending the music. I am excited about coming this year. I am hoping you have good opportunities for us English players
  6. I am very please to report that my Edeophone has found and new home and is returning to her motherland. Thank you Greg J. for all your help and support!! A donation has been made to the site. I don't know for sure if the new owner is a member as I could not find her in the directory...her name is Caz. Congratulation Caz for a fine adoption! Stephen
  7. I had the pleasure of playing this instrument at the 2012 Old Pal Festival in March. It is a very very nice instrument, and the only thing keeping me from it is my personal indigence. Whoever purchases this Edeophone will have a wonderful instrument in their hands. Reed, How you doing friend. Thank you for your comments about the Edeophone. She is a great instrument I just unfortunately have too many nice concertinas acquired during my personal period of "concertina acquisition neurosis" :-). You looked and played great with Edeophone are you sure your name isn't written on her?
  8. The Edeophone, I believe will meet your requirements fine. Great price check it out price wise to the one being sold by buttonbox.com
  9. Lachenal EC Edeophone Raised Metal Ends for New Home Great Opportunity - All reasonable offers considered. Check out the buttonboxs.com they have a similar Edeophone for sale for $3800. After much soul searching, I have decided to put my Edeophone up for sale. Why? This is my second year in the concertina world; quite honestly I am a recovering concertinist from "concertina acquisition neurosis". Since I started I have purchased a vintage Lachenal (brass), Wheatstone (steel) and a Wheatstone Baritone. I really like all of them but the reality is that I was simply not able to play all of them. This instrument deserves to be owned by someone who will play her. I purchased her last year here on CNET from a very nice lady from the State of Washington below is what she wrote me all all hold true today. "She is an English Concertina, 48 keys (lowest note is a G) 6 bellows folds, is tuned to concert pitch and has raised metal ends. I bought this instrument in the early 1980's just after it was extensively refurbished by Colin Diper (His work stamp can be seen when the metal ends are removed). The instrument is in excellent shape and has a full gorgeous sound and quick response. The serial #48055 which I think indicates it was around (1912)? The concertina comes with a sturdy case that was hand crafted in 1985 especially for it." I have decided to post it initially here on CNET hoping it is bought by someone who I know will appreciate her. A great opportunity make and offer and my personal email is stephenknoll@yahoo.com Thank you, StephenTx
  10. Yes that is why I included that picture. . I wouldn't say that it was necessarily unfortunate but rather isn't it fortunate that we have the capability of fixing these rich vintage instruments and bringing them back to great shape.
  11. Hi I noticed your post, I have a fully resotred brass reeded Lachenal EC very mellow sound that I would consider placing for US 750. I would love to keep it but I have too 3 other concertinas and do not have time to play this one as it should be played. My email is stephenknoll@yahoo.com

  12. Lachenal EC Edeophone Raised Metal Ends for New Home After much soul searching, I have decided to put my Edeophone up for sale. Why? This is my second year in the concertina world; quite honestly I am a recovering concertinist from "concertina acquisition neurosis". Since I started I have purchased a vintage Lachenal (brass), Wheatstone (steel) and a Wheatstone Baritone. I really like all of them but the reality is that I was simply not able to play all of them. This instrument deserves to be owned by someone who will play her. I purchased her last year here on CNET from a very nice lady from the State of Washington below is what she wrote me all all hold true today. "She is an English Concertina, 48 keys (lowest note is a G) 6 bellows folds, is tuned to concert pitch and has raised metal ends. I bought this instrument in the early 1980's just after it was extensively refurbished by Colin Diper (His work stamp can be seen when the metal ends are removed). The instrument is in excellent shape and has a full gorgeous sound and quick response. The serial #48055 which I think indicates it was around (1912)? The concertina comes with a sturdy case that was hand crafted in 1985 especially for it." I have decided to post it initially here on CNET hoping it is bought by someone who I know will appreciate her. The asking price is $3600 and my personal email is stephenknoll@yahoo.com Thank you, StephenTx
  13. Hi just wondering if still available? I am wondering why you are selling? StephenTx
  14. Would you be interested in doing it via Skype. Pauline desono in the Netherlands is excellent , I have been having lessons by her via Skype and she is great and very well known and respected. You can see her playing on you tube. Let me know if I can provide more info to yo. Stephen tTx
  15. Hi Dave, I have an metal ended edeophone that I want to modify for a neck strap ....how would you recommend it be done. Thank you soooooo much very appreciated. Stephen Tx

  16. Randy, As a student of Pauline deSnoo I use a strap and purchased some from Wm. Wakker at $42.00 (IMHO much too much for the material that goes into them). Pauline stressed "balance" of the concertina and does not believe they should be place through the thumb straps as it causes an "unbalancing of the concertina" rather they should be place as described in this discussion or a special eyelet modification. I recently sent my metal ended Edeophone to Greg J. and one of the things he will do is modify it so I can wear a neck strap.. Being metal ended it tends to be heavier and without a strap I experience a lot of "thumb pain" compared to my Wheatstones. This all being said. I have watched many of your videos and really like how you "get into playing" and the dynamic movement of your concertina and how it contributes to the musicality of the pieces you play. This is restricted with the typical neck stray and I have been thinking of using an elastic strap that would be able to independently support the instrument at the correct playing height but flexible enough to allow me to move the concertina around as you do. In my mind it would include either leather or a some sort of a reinforcement that would sit on the neck for it to be more comfortable. The leather piece could be sewn to the ends of the elastic, a hole punched through it and held in place by the thumb strap screws. I did notice on the you tube video below which I believe is Gill that he showed the used of the elastic strap, but much longer than I would get. Pauline, feels the strap should hold the instrument with your elbow bent in front of you. I got a kick out of the suspender solution. This might be a good one for you...but you might lose your britches. :-) Seriously that solution seems restrictive to me. Love the music you play as you know I have contacted you in the past to see if you do lessons. Hey you got me motivated, I think I am going to the Hobby Shop this afternoon to see if I can find the elastic and swivels to make a couple for me and see how it works. I want to be able to swing like you Randy!!! StephenTx
  17. Don, To be honest with you I don't know the answer to your question. I have heard talk that the older Stagi's like this one were of a better quality. Hoping some of our knowlegeable folks weigh in on it. ''
  18. STAGI ENGLISH BARITONE WITH 7 FOLD BELLOWS 40 BUTTONS Great Stagi Baritone nice tonality - In pitch. I purchased this earlier this year, as I was wanting a Baritone loved playing it and the 7 fold bellows is cool. Previously owned and cared for well by a music teacher. I liked the Baritone so much I bought a Wheatstone Baritone and obviously do not need both of them. It will be up for auction for seven days. If someone from here buys it I will make a donation to CNET. It is posted on Ebay and will run for seven days starting Sunday July 29 at 8 pm CST. The starting bid is $450. Here is the link: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trksid=p5197.m570.l1313&_nkw=english+concertina+baritone&_sacat=0
  19. David, colleague...really is ironic as I too introduce myself as avocation and vocation in the same way you do albeit without the graphics. I have been in surgical anesthesia administration for many years, prior to moving to Texas I was the Executive Director of Corporate Operating Rooms, Anesthesia Services for Columbia Presbyterian. I am not with The Joint Commission for the past 7 years, 5 of which were a full time Surveyor and presently I am the Associate Director of Standards Interpretation a Chicago central office job albeit I am able to telecommute most of the time and I speak around the country once a month. I have taken the music theory course, the issue is remembering and incorporating it all into playing. How long have you been playing the concertina? It is getting late, more later. PS I agree with your anesthesia wisdoms, I was a Director (founder) of a School of Nurse Anesthesia at The Queen's Medical Center in Honolulu in the late 70's and 80's, I was with Queens (home) for 25 years prior to moving to Columbia. More later Stephen-
  20. Mary, Seem like I'm running about 6 months behind you. I wish I had a group to play with who are slightly above or at my level with a tutor above each of us....you know with the new Skype you can do a group...I keep thinking with the right folks this would be fun." I love San Diego and thinking about moving there...to retire. Stephen Tx
  21. David, Darn I know what your saying is very important and I do understand the concept but what I would not give to Skype with you for awhile for a demo and futher discussion. I loved the graphic vocation and avocation. Did you do that for me as it hits the nail on the head as I am a CRNA (anesthetist) by vocation.... Stephen Tx
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