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StephenTx

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Everything posted by StephenTx

  1. The aucioneers has also suffered from their own incompetence. They earn a percentage, so if the hammer price had been double their commission would also be double. It is in the auctioneers interest to sell for the highest possible price. So I'd agree that it sounds like cock-up rather than consipiracy.
  2. Oh yes, I am sure he will....I am not holding anything against Mr. Algar he was very nice, and your right he would have outbidded me in the end. But this sort of an experience does make one wonder ....and I will leave it at that. No more said.
  3. Yes Stephen, this is a shame, however, you ought to keep in mind that had your bid been included then Mr. Algar would have just had to pay more. I suggest that he would have bid to more than £3000 to secure this instrument and he would still make a profit on re-selling it. That is how he makes a living. Sad though this is for you, please remember that if you really need a particlar type of Concertina then Mr.Algar will find one for you. Also I think it was a fair move by Chris Algar to sell this very rare instrument through the international forum of Ebay... gives us all a chance to aquire it at a "whatever anyone is prepared to pay" price. Whatever about the large profit he made I think the sale price was not unreasonable for a good Baritone EC.
  4. Hello from the US how are you doing?

  5. This baritone was sold in auction for under $1000 and was bought by Chris Algers. I know because I placed a bid with the auctioneer who "forgot" to place my bid and it was won for a price under my bid. I was just a bit more than ticked off at the time. The auction house said they were "sorry". Oh well it was not meant to be I guess. Chris came away with a very nice profit.
  6. Shelly I am told (no expert here) that violin must is good for the treble concertina and that is much of what I am using. The cello sheet music I am told is more suited for a baritone concertina or I would imagine a tenor baritone and finally the bass more for the bass and so forth I have purchased these wonderful Fake music books for the violin that have the melodies and the corresponding cords. The Classical book I have has over 800 pieces of music. But there again I am a newbie and learning much from all the folks on CNET so I throw out what I have been told with the hope of being corrected if necessary.
  7. I'll heartily second this. Piano tutors of the 'Easy classics' and 'Children's Classics' type are always worth a look; children can't cope with going low into the bass it would seem (short arms I suppose) so you get a sparse arrangement which fits the concertina better than grown-up music. Well, as long as your instrument does actually have some bass notes, anyway. Of course whether what you are offered is something you'd want to play is another matter, but I've found some good stuff in the kids' music included in my piles of jumble sale music. (This is the way I buy my music these days, in vast tattered anonymous piles for a few bob 'to clear'. I've found all sorts of things.)
  8. I'll heartily second this. Piano tutors of the 'Easy classics' and 'Children's Classics' type are always worth a look; children can't cope with going low into the bass it would seem (short arms I suppose) so you get a sparse arrangement which fits the concertina better than grown-up music. Well, as long as your instrument does actually have some bass notes, anyway. Of course whether what you are offered is something you'd want to play is another matter, but I've found some good stuff in the kids' music included in my piles of jumble sale music. (This is the way I buy my music these days, in vast tattered anonymous piles for a few bob 'to clear'. I've found all sorts of things.)
  9. Jim, You are right. Dirge and I were "joshing" one another in humor on both sides....there is no friction.
  10. A sense of humor helps a lot, especially if you find you've inadvertently played the straight man. If we were really critical of typing and typos, not to mention linguistic and grammatical errors, there would probably be more posts of criticism here than posts about concertinas. Best to grin along with (at least some of) the rest of us when someone finds humor in what you've written.
  11. Peace...just to let ya'all know that Dirge and I both we acting in "jest"....were friends...no conflict
  12. Hi Dirge, Off line I just wanted you to know that my response was intended with humor in-so-far as even saying "my mother told me..." That why I ended it with a :-)....seems to have created alot of discussion.... but I was not offended with your note. Stephen

  13. Your right and my intention was more humor injected therefore the :-) symbol if I were unhappy I would perhaps use another symbol. This is one of the challenges in texting, chatting etc. is to capture the "emotional intention(s)
  14. A sense of humor helps a lot, especially if you find you've inadvertently played the straight man. If we were really critical of typing and typos, not to mention linguistic and grammatical errors, there would probably be more posts of criticism here than posts about concertinas. Best to grin along with (at least some of) the rest of us when someone finds humor in what you've written.
  15. My mother taught me if you don't have anything nice to say.... I didn't realize we were so critical with typing and typo's :-)
  16. Chris, Interesting and I would enjoy pictures. The way I am visualizing what you are doing I wonder how you keep the straps from slipping and damaging the bellows? Of course I am visualizing of a bounge type sort of strap. Looking forwarding to hearing more and thank you for responding. Stephen
  17. John, Wow "organology"...quite honestly I didn't know the word existed. As a health care professional I would have guessed it meant study of body organs. Thank you for sharing such very interesting and informative inforation. Stephen
  18. Stephen, As I understand the history of organology books, the concertina didn't actually fall out of favour as a classical instrument - it just never succeeded in being accepted into the canon of classical instruments along with the strings, woodwind and brass. One important point is that, at the time of the concetina's inception, the symphony orchestra had all that it needed by way of tone colours - and had had it for a long time! Even the valve for brass instruments, which made trumpets, horns and tubas chromatic, was invented aound 1815, so by the time the concertina came along, the Romantic symphony orchestra instrumentation was complete. Admittedly, the English concertina fulfils all the criteria that are cited for a classical instrument: it is fully chromatic, and can produce a continuous note the can be influenced throughout its duration (cresc., dim., sforzando, etc.). However, another criterion is the availability of sufficient numbers of proficient players to staff an orchestra that is expected to play "difficult" music. The strings and woodwind and the trombone had been around for centuries, and had a wide base of manufacturers and teachers, and corresponding numbers of learners and players, so that even a small percentage of players who were up to professional standard were enough to staff the orchestras. There was also a long tradition of horn and trumpet playing, so the invention of the valved brass was exploited by already proficient brass players. The new concertina lacked this broad basis; its professional creme de la creme were not even a small percentage of all players - they were exceptional individuals. As to the early "classical" pieces for EC: remember that bourgeois amateur music in the mid-19th century was what we would today call "classical". Children were taught violin or piano, and young people had voice training, and were then expected to entertain family and friends at soirees, playing composed music from the sheet. In this context, the EC - which has the range of the violin and a similar timbre - was obviously an option, because no amount of tuition enables a person to play the violin in tune, unless that person already has a good ear and fine motoric control. However, if you can merely find the right notes on an EC, they're at least in tune. If I had to be subjected to an evening of rank amateur light classical music, I'd much rather hear a mediochre EC than a mediochre violin! Of course, the decline of the bourgeoisie and the rise of recording media did away with the necessity for house music, and the boxed concertina joined the cased violin on top of the unplayed piano, while the youngsters of the family joyously cranked up the gramophone ... Thus the concertina fell into the hands of the rural or proletarian musician. The Anglo-German concertina was already there, but apparently there were geographical Anglo-free niches, where the EC was able to go into hibernation, waiting for the Great Folk Revival. If you personally wish to call to memory a role that the concertina once played - and probably played well - more power to your elbow! It's all part of life's rich pattern, and it would be a pity if it got lost altogether. Just my view of the matter! I'm not a historian, just a histoically interested amateur musician. Cheers, John 'Classical' music need not necessarily be restricted to the English Concertina. A certain amount of suitable 'Classical' music can be satisfactorily adapted for the solo Anglo intrument by those with the required spirit of adventure.
  19. Leo and all I am using the illustration you sent on my other concertina ...bought from Concertina.com. But the Edeo does not have screws for the thumb straps. Thank you though for the suggestion. Whatever is done has to be in a similar position as the illustration to maintain the correct balance. Something originating from the sides would not (unfortunately) work such as the grill.
  20. I acquired an Lachenal Edeophone right here on CNET and received him yesterday serial 48055.. I started with my first concertina in July a Solomon & Company Lachenal Brass Reed English followed by a vintage Wheatstone silver reeded that is currently with Greg Jowaisas and having her facelift as I call it; Greg also restored the first concerting. BTW Greg does one heck of a job! I am set now with my concertinas! I am into all types of music but primarily into Classical and American contemporary and Musicals...anyhow all that is for general interest. I am taking lessons via Skype from Pauline de Snoo in Holland and I am located in Texas...it has been a wonderful experience. Pauline is an advocate of a neck cord for balance of the instrument (I know that debate could go on and on but never-the-less; it is what I am learning on too and really like it). ISSUE: On my other two concertinas I am able to affix the cord under the finger strap screw. The Edeophone does not have finger strap screws as I am certain you are all aware of. My question then is how to affix the neck cord..is there another option besides drilling a hole? Your thoughts are appreciated.
  21. This is quite interesting as the concertina as I understand it from reading and discussions with Pauline the concertina started out as a classical instrument, in fact many classical pieces are written for the concertina. I can't help but wonder why if fell out of favor too? I wish we there were more classicalist...although there seems to be in a few in England and Holland. The Swaledale Festival in Northern England does bring together a number of classical players. There is a YouTube video from the Festival this year search "Swaledale Frestival concertina". I would love to get something going in the States if there are individuals interested. Fe
  22. Colleagues, I see many festivals popping up here and there in the States but they are seemed to be focused on Folk Music. I am a "newbie" since July and more into the Classical/Broadway and Contemporary Music. I am taking lessons via Skype from Pauline de Snoo in Holland as her speciality is definitely Classical which I am enjoying tremendously. I plan on attending the Swaledale Squeeze next May in England...but I was wondering if there was a gathering of concertinaist in the US that also brought together those with a classical leaning. Thank you.
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