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RP3

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About RP3

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    Chatty concertinist

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Concertina, hammered dulcimer, and live steam locomotives.
  • Location
    Western North Carolina

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  1. Also try melodeon.net. They focus on accordions. Ross Schlabach
  2. Kim, I Too have big hands and find Lachenal and Wheatstone concertinas generally too small for my hands. But Crabb, Ball Beavon and Jeffries concertinas work just fine. Surprisingly, the sizes of these three brands is usually about 1/4" smaller across than the Lachenal and Wheatstones, but the button layout on the Crabbs, etc are more open. This is what helps with big hands, not the overall size of the instrument. In fact I am more comfortable playing my Jeffries than a Wheatstone sized concertina. So unless your hands are really much bigger than my "farmers hands", concertina size is not the
  3. Alex, you put the green marks in the wrong place. If you look carefully on either side of his second finger, you can see the edges of two buttons which would properly align with the rest of your green marks to create a uniformly spaced outer row. When Jeffries created 28 or 26 button instruments, he left off the top button on each outer row and shifted the remaining buttons toward the upper side (closest to the thumbs). I have a 28 button Bb/F and had a 28 button C/G with that pattern, have friends with 26 button models and I never have seen any <30 button Anglo Jeffries with the uneven but
  4. While i cannot personally confirm that it was exactly 5” across, there was a small 30 button Jeffries concertina at the 1997 NE Squeeze-In IIRC and that instrument belonged to Noel Hill. That same instrument was featured at the time in Big Nick’s Concertina Guide on the web but the guide is no longer posted. Never heard it play but I can vouch for it’s existence. Ross Schlabach
  5. I remember that Mark Bickford had a 26 button A/E that Noel Hill played at our 1996 NHICS class at Bucksteep. He was able to play some wonderful tunes on that old box, and I agree with Larry that this pitch combination was delightful. Ross Schlabach
  6. While my session playing days are now over and I was never that good, I can say fairly that “using dots” is not just frowned on in many sessions, but it has the ability to ruin a session. There are several reasons. Unless you only play in a single session with just people who play the tune exactly as your dots represent it, your following the dots can leave you out of step with any changes or variations that arise. And what do you do when they switch to a second or third tune in a set? Do you madly flip pages? Irish music in sessions is, in most instances, fluid while dots are not. Following d
  7. Thanks to all for suggestions. Distance doesn’t help: he has good hearing and kicks off when I do! The conditioning option is the only real hope. So before I open the concertina case, I put on my dog treat pouch. As soon as I start playing and Finney starts to sing along, I tell him to be quiet. If He does, he gets a treat. Of course to give him the treat, I have to stop playing so he gets double reinforcement. So I am not sure who is training who. But at least I’ve been able to squeeze out a few tunes - in peace and quiet! Ross Schlabach
  8. Gosh Greg! How is Suzanne going to deal with your ego now! And the fishing. What with that glowing halo, you will never be able to sneak up on a choice rainbow or brown again. ? Ross Schlabach PS: I own several Jowaisas-restored Fine concertinas and I have to second the glowing kudos being bestowed - even if he is supposed to be retired and out fly fishing!!
  9. As some of you already know, I have been playing the Anglo for better or worse since 1996. I have acquired some wonderful instruments and even enjoy practicing. But something unexpected has drastically affected my relationship with the concertina. In late July, I brought home a wonderful furry new friend - our latest Australian Shepherd - Fintan. And to my shock, when I took my concertina out for some long overdue practice, with the first note my playing was immediately accompanied by the joyful howl of my puppy dog. I tried different pitch models, I tried moving to the other end of the house
  10. I would like to touch on two issues: one mentioned in previous responses and one not. First, as mentioned, the C/G offers the user the ability to cross rows on account of note duplication between the keys of C and G. This is a big deal. I have attempted to play tunes along the rows as might be done on a G/D, and I recognize that this was a style used in Ireland some time ago - and there may still be some adherents to this method. But the compactness of playing available when playing across the rows which allows one to make the best use of their first two fingers of each hand - the strongest on
  11. Tony, another possibility. Do you have the reedpans that the C/G reeds will be coming from? If so, and you can not use the donor concertina body/bellows anyhow, then there is the possibility that you can fit the C/G reedpans into the Bb/F concertina with the C/G reeds in their original slots. The fit may not be precise but occasionally the judicious addition of more chamois in the recipient concertina bellows frames will allow the C/G reedpans to fit. Otherwise as everybody else has already told you, your suggested plan will be difficult. Ross Schlabach
  12. I am pretty sure that Rushworth & Dreaper was a retailer of concertinas. For a number of years, I owned a nice concertina bought from Paul Groff that had a brass plate engraved with the “Rushworth & Dreaper” name and the address “Islington”. The instrument was identified as a Crabb concertina, had metal ends with the fretwork usually associated with Crabb & Jeffries and bellows papers and gold stamping also associated with the same two makers. This instrument was also the spitting image of Anglo concertinas that are labeled as Ball Beavons. i wish I had some photos of t
  13. Over the years, it has been common for sellers of modern made instruments to market their instruments with a premium for not having to wait a certain number of years for delivery of a new concertina. BUT, that was when the Irish Tiger was roaring, demand was very high and the supply low. However, circumstances have changed dramatically. Today there are several builders filling the void for quality concertinas, builder backlogs are much shorter, and the demand has lessened significantly. Carroll Concertinas are now down to a backlog of just 12 months or a bit more. Just try to sell
  14. I have a wonderful Sean Fallon two concertina case. He has retired but Frank Edgely took over Sean's concertina case business. Back in 2011 Frank said he initially was only going to make the single cases, but he may have changed his mind since then. You could check with him to see if he has expanded his offerings to once again offer two concertina cases. Ross Schlabach
  15. Yep, best to cover all your bases. Ross Schlabach
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