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Joe Holloway

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  1. hey Joe Boo! ?? Bring it along to a session. I have been looking for a project -Joe-B^)
  2. Hi Irene, Yes, I meant Raphie's. I found the size of Norman's in the ledger and that was confirmed by his reply. Thanks Norman. I wanted to understand the physical size difference between a 57/58 key and the full 70 key instrument. This is all in a vague effort to try and compute how much difference there might be in responsiveness, which I could understand completely, if I could get such an instrument(s) in between my hands for even five minutes. But, I digress.. A measurement would be wonderfull.. Thanks, -Joe-B^) Hi Joe, The Aeola and the Hex box are both around 7 inches across as Irene says. As for responsiveness, when I first got the Aeola, Having cleaned it up, fixed stuck reeds etc, It played like a dog! It had obviously been hidden away for some years. Gradually, it came to life, and now it's action is pretty fast. Either it's changed, or I have! Also, because I use it all the time, the bellows are beginning to leak a bit, which ironically, suits my style of playing. It lets me get more "bounce" into a tune. (I play a lot for dancing BTW). IMHO though. the bigger Duets have obviously more Bass end reeds which are longer, and therefore need more air before they leap into action. Hence my comment earlier re response times. But Hey. We are all different! I think I've found the one for me. (Would like to try something in the 60 key range though). Put it this way. Have been playing the bugger since 1973, and I'm still finding new things!! Good luck with your quest, and remember.....A Concertina is not just for Christmas, it comes in useful when you run out of logs on Boxing day! Hi Ralph, That's only a quarter inch larger than my current English, which should make it a fairly manageable instrument. I wouldn't mind trying something larger as well. Playing for dancers is just plain hard work, but fun -Joe-B^)
  3. Hi Irene, Yes, I meant Raphie's. I found the size of Norman's in the ledger and that was confirmed by his reply. Thanks Norman. I wanted to understand the physical size difference between a 57/58 key and the full 70 key instrument. This is all in a vague effort to try and compute how much difference there might be in responsiveness, which I could understand completely, if I could get such an instrument(s) in between my hands for even five minutes. But, I digress.. A measurement would be wonderfull.. Thanks, -Joe-B^)
  4. Hi, Can you tell me what the measurement of the concertina is from top to bottom in inches ? Thanks, -Joe-B^)
  5. Hi, After a fair bit of research and some helpful suggestions by some ppl. I'm looking for a future instrument. Possibly a project instrument. A Wheatstone Aeola 56 or 58 key Duet with the low C on the right hand and the Octave overlap. Ebony ended with Brass Reed Shoes and bushed buttons, preferably metal. I don't really care about the condition of the instrument, only that the fundamental stuff like the reeds and the wood are structurally in tact. It can need new pads, bellows the whole works. It may need the kind of work that only love can provide, as after restoration, it would have to be prised from my cold dead hands To restate my intention, I'm looking for an instrument I intend to play frequently, not for investment or resale purposes. If you know the whereabouts of such an instrument, please don't hesitate to drop me a message. Thanks, -Joe-B^) PS: The neighbours don't hate me... Yet... Perhaps another polka ?
  6. Hi Mike I saw that 55 button at Whitby on Chris Algar's stand ... but it 's lowest button on the right hand was a G. Before I bought my 61k in May I received advice from someone who's been playing for 35 years that I should consider a 57 or 61 key, which went down to middle C on the right hand, and had an octave crossover. It was suggested to me that I personally did not really need a 71 key - but I'm sure that Dirge, who plays a 71 , would disagree!! I believe Iris has actually got two Maccanns at least ... but cannot for the life of me remember what sizes they were. I suspect someone more knowledgeable will be along in a minute It's not really clear from that question whether you're asking for advice about Maccanns, or about all other types of concertina, in view of your asking about "playing in the mainly trad keys" - since a Maccann is chromatic. Quick ... where are the REALLY knowledgeable people on here??? (I speak with all of the gravitas of someone who's been playing for 18 months...) Thanks Irene I suppose I was asking 'what's the best number of buttons for what I want to do which is mainly trad?'. Cheers Mike Hi Mike. I'm the bloke about whom Irene was talking! I started on a 48 Macann. Quickly found it too limiting, so moved up to a 56. Have played nothing else for 30 years. As Irene says, though, it's vital that it goes down to C on the right, and that you have that octave repeated on both sides... These are slightly rarer. (a lot only go down to G on the right, which means you get loads of dog scaring notes at the very top end, which, quite frankly you'll never use! And why pay money for notes that you're not going to play) Have dabbled with boxes in the 60's and 70 key sizes,(and bigger!) but the disadvantage is the reaction time of the reeds particularly if you want to get some speed up. I play both for song accompaniment, and in several English Dance bands. so, I need the versatility of the 56 key box. It'll suit you down to the ground for folk song and tune stuff.... As for the really big buggers....a) They're much heavier and You press a button and wait 5 minutes for a note to appear!! The 56 has served me well for a long time, and I'm still discovering new avenues with it. FYI, My home keys are. Majors C,G,D,A,E F,Bb,Eb, and a little bit of Ab if the winds in the right direction! Minors Am,Em,Bm, F sharp m,Dm,Cm. That seems to cover most tunes! and I can normally adapt to any singer that I'm playing with. Hope the above helps...But, you'll have hours of fun with a 56 Key!!! Good luck Ralph Hi Ralph.I own the 72 key Wheatstone Maccann,& I can assure you that if the response was as slow as you say,I certainly wouldn't have bought it. If anything,the response is faster than the smaller & cheaper models.Cheers,Norman. Hi Norman. Apologies. No offense meant. But I'm sure you've seen some fairly ropey boxes in your time!! I'm sure your box is well set up, It's just that for me, a 72 key would be a waste. I doubt that I would ever explore it's outer reaches with the style that I play in! Maybe to see it sometime. Cheers Ralph Hi, I don't usually post, but I would like some clarification here from anyone else who plays a MacCann duet, as I am seriously looking to start playing one myself. I have looked up the fingering charts laid out very nicely in Rutterford, Ernest. A Practical and Comprehensive Tutor for the Duet Concertina The first fingering chart that goes down to Low C is shown as 58 key instrument, which would make Ralph's instrument either modified, or custom built. Incidently I'd love to know more about your concertina Ralph, like which make, it's size etc. Pics would be great! I understand from speaking to other players the importance of having this extended range and overlap, but was wanting to be sure as to wether I should be looking for a 56 or 58 key instrument, wether 56 key instruments tuned down to low c on the right hand are common or not. I know it's only a 2 key difference, but I want to be looking for the right thing. I want the smallest instrument possible that will be suitable for folk and classical music. Any feedback would be much appreciated. -Joe-B^)
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