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peelypost

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About peelypost

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 12/25/1970

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Music, Yurts, Horses, Adventures!
  • Location
    Loughborough, Leicestershire
  1. Greetings, I see the difference between hand and wrist straps, Jim - thanks for correcting me. I want to give this a try. Where do you fix them? Do you have any tips for sourcing leather for the straps (I'm thinking of recycling a leather belt)? Thanks all, Neil.
  2. Greetings, I recently went to a folk club for the first time since I have started playing concertina (English) and noticed that every person playing English (well, there were 3!) had wrist straps a la Anglo. I have never seen these on any of the videos I have seen and wondered how many Ec players use wrist straps. It seems to make a lot of sense as a method of reducing thumb stress on the pull, and I am tempted to give it a try. Any thoughts? Neil.
  3. try http://www.concertina.net/images/wm_english_chords_right.jpg and http://www.concertina.net/images/wm_english_chords_left.jpg Neil.
  4. This is magnificent - thanks! The zip file of tunes for Louise is exactly what I need and far more than I could have hoped for. I don't suppose you know where I can find the music to My Lady Cullen? I can't find it on the session.org I found another useful set of tips at Martin's intro to the concertina on YouTube - lesson 9ish, I think (sorry not to be more specific!). If I'm feeling brave I might even record a first attempt at adding some chords once I have a version I can play reliably. Neil.
  5. I thought that I would add a little bit here, to help any other Jackie owners. This was my first time at open-heart surgery on a concertina and so the previous posts here were invaluable (and thanks to Tallship for his fantastic advice!). First of all, I didn't go to the lengths of making a wooden box for supporting the instrument, but made one from a sturdy cardboard box instead. This seemed to do the job nicely and I think that it is worth the effort. My problem was that the middle Bb was not sounding on the pull. This is a bit annoying as that means it was the inside reed which needed sorting out. The only access is to gently pull back the valve foils to get access. Following advice from Tallship, I used a couple of bbq bamboo skewers to push the reed to try to increase the gap between the reed and surround. You will notice in the first post in this thread an extract from Wim Wakker stating: I used a small screwdriver at first but this marked the reed; BBQ skewers don't have this problem. Take note of the phrase "Repeat until corrected". It took me about 5 times, opening and re-assembling the instrument to get it right, as I certainly did not want to bend the reed too far. I felt that I had to push on it quite firmly to fix it in the end. I eventually found that you can do an intermediate test of the reed by placing the wooden end in place on the bellows (without screwing it in place) and pressing the key whilst pulling and pushing. Despite a lot of air leakage, this allows for the reed to be tested. I also cleaned the reeds on the "push" side using paper (see photo). Make sure that the buttons are all basically in line when you put on the end during reassembly and it goes on quite easily ready for re-screwing together. The only other problem I had was one of the buttons coming off the lever (see photo) and this needed a bit of manipulation to get back in place but was quite easy. So, I now have it all working well again. Neil.
  6. The Jackie is hexagonal, with about 19cm between parallel faces, which means about 21cm between the points. It is about 19cm wide when closed (excluding thumbstraps and finger plates). Neil.
  7. I would certainly use it, Peter. In fact, as I have mentioned in another post, my current 'study' piece which I am rather pleased with was learned this way (your La luna dins l'aiga video, thread, and score posted a few weeks ago). You could always just post the abc / score along with the link to the video as a starter. Cheers, Neil.
  8. Sorry - yes, a diad is two notes at once, triad is three notes at once...
  9. Greetings, I feel that I am getting a basic handle on my English Jackie and am wanting to start adding some harmony lines to the lead tune. The tunes in my tutorial books only have intermittent diads and all of the online tunes only list the lead line, so I'm feeling like I don't know where to go from here. There seems to be a huge jump from where I am to the type of stuff I hear from the best players. Should I gradually increase the rate of diads, or start composing a harmony line for the whole tune? What tends to be successful? Also, it seems that abc notation is monophonic - is there an easy way of posting a harmony line here, to see what others might think of it? I guess that I need to resort to images of score or recordings, but it would be nice to avoid attachments if possible. Neil.
  10. Thanks all - great tips. Mr ProfRat's video is impressive, especially the harmonies and chords. I think that I will give the strap a miss, though! It seems that everyone plays in a different way. Many good players seem to avoid contact with the little finger altogether and so that is what I am targetting at the moment. Last night I tried putting a loose elastic band around the offending finger and this worked nicely for trying to train that finger to not support the instrument. Neil PS - My favourite tune at the moment is 'la luna dins l'aiga', as played by Peter Trimming a few weeks ago on YouTube.
  11. Hi, Looking through the forums I see that several have mentioned the problem of locked little fingers. I get this in my right hand. I know that I should keep all fingers curved, but that little pinky extends when I am playing higher notes, and then does not naturally curl back. Does anyone have any top tips for training the finger to stay in place? Thanks, Neil.
  12. ...and peelypost arose from an old genuine nickname of Neily Peely, which resulted in my family being referred to as the Peelys. I guess that it has stuck after a decade or so of logging into online bulletin boards. I'll try to make it a habit of including the signature with my name in if I can work out how to do it. Neil.
  13. You can produce some interesting tunes by doing this, though! The first few bars of the Simpsons theme is one of these modal keys (start on the F, keep on the natural notes), as is Scarborough Fair (start on the D, keep on the natural notes). The keys have odd names (Lydian and Mixolydian are some of the best known), but I can never remember which one is which! Enjoy! Neil.
  14. Alan's photos uploaded as PDF E2144FBB.pdf Neil.
  15. These resources are marvellous indeed, and thanks so much for putting in the effort for setting up and maintaining them. Indeed, Martyn's tutorials were part of the process of my deciding to take up the instrument, as I got a good idea of what I was letting myself in for.
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