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gcoover

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  1. Malcolm, thanks so much for the info on expatshield, it was an easy free download and worked perfectly. It's quite a good interview, and the presenter asks very knowledgeable questions - I'm too used to the mindless idiots we often have here on TV in the States! Gary
  2. Marcus It loads the site, then says "Not Available In Your Area". Why would they not want folks in the US to see it? I hope they're still not mad about that little Revolutionary War thing a few years ago... Gary
  3. Leo, the one from Canada with Piet Visser actually belongs in the South Africa category. And the one from the movie should be in a new "lip-sync" category! Funny how a cheap 20-key anglo can sound like a piano accordion and a full orchestra, or.........maybe it's an early midi-concertina?!? Thanks so much for trolling YouTube every week for these gems! Gary
  4. Several years ago, the x-ray lady at the Houston airport told me to open up the concertina case, and then she asked me to "turn it on". Well, rather than talk dirty to it, I gently lifted my 50-button Jeffries Duet out of the case, mashed down every single note at once with both hands and then pulled for all I was worth. Needless to say, she was not amused, but I do think that awful chord is still echoing about the airport to this very day! Gary
  5. Mary, sounds like a good opportunity for you to organize something in San Diego! Yes, that's how these things work - the person with the most interest gets to be the catalyst. With other players in the area, plus Michael Eskin with his "iConcertina" apps, it could turn into something really fun. Does the morris team there use concertina? Any players involved with the "Star of India" square-rigger? And then there is also Coronado Island, Balboa Park, the Gaslamp District.....Ok, I've already talked myself into coming! Wouldn't mind at all going to Tucson either. I met Rod at Palestine this year and he's a masterful player on the Crane, and one of the stalwarts who went the distance on the 3am concertina session. Perhaps there's a nice desert resort where we could organize something? I'm sure the non-musical spouses and hangers-on would appreciate alternate activities. I can see the group photo now, with all of us playing concertina by (or in) the pool. Gary
  6. A big ol' Texas thanks to Jody Kruskal and to all the wonderful concertina players who helped make the 2011 Old Pal Concertina Weekend such a wonderful success! The event just gets better and better, and this year it included players from 6 states which I think is the most ever. We had English, Anglo, Crane and Hayden Duets, plus one mini and two basses. Musically we had a nice mix of accomplished players and absolute beginners, and even the weather was a mix of hot and cool. The redbud trees, dogwood trees, azaleas and bluebonnets were in full bloom along the roadways, and there were areas where the purple wisteria was over 100 high in the trees. And of course, legendary East Texas BBQ. So good in fact, that we all went to Shep's BBQ twice. There is a sign in the restaurant that says "No one leaves here hungry". Very true. Jody taught us all "Waltz Across Texas" which about a dozen of us then performed on the auditorium stage to a full house that gleefully joined in with the singing. Due to Jody's arranging skills we had quite the full concertina band sound, and numerous people commented afterwards about how much they enjoyed it. Another high point of the weekend was an impromptu jam session after the main concert with 6 concertinas that outlasted all of the other old time music jam sessions around the festival. We played everything from Irish to English to German to Oldtime to whatever, but had to leave at 3am when they locked up the building! Once again, thanks to Dan Worrall for all his efforts over the years to make this event a success. I can't believe he let something like his son's wedding get in the way of his attending Old Pal this year.....talk about a lame excuse! Gary
  7. Yep, it's virtually identical to the one I bought many years ago for $25. The bellows and RHS are now my tuning bellows, so I'd say that was money well spent! Gary
  8. This is almost identical to an Anglo I bought many years ago, pretty on the outside but the insides looked they were made out of popsicle sticks, and the reeds were all riveted onto long lead plates - obvious old German, but unfortunately not really playable. Whoever bids on this one better look inside before paying anything over $100! Gary
  9. Rhomylly, We all wish you the speediest of recoveries, and the strength to deal with such a drastic cure. Hopefully you still have energy to play a few notes now and then, give that bad stuff an extra bashing with your concertina! We'll be thinking of you in Palestine. Gary
  10. Looks like notation for a Chemnitzer concertina, they use some really strange button notations. Gary
  11. No need to run for cover, Dan, although the last time I said something similar it ruffled a few feathers ! Is there no virtuosity out there to prove the true potential scope and versatility of the Anglo. If so, where is it hiding ? No hiding...there are plenty of good examples on Anglo International. Then go to the Boeremusiek sites and look at all the CDs there...some of that is amazing and modern; others are more into the old styles. I documented a wealth of black African CDs from various countries in my book--or ask Harry Scurfield, who knows much more about the Squashbox. There is a fair number of publically available good Australian recordings (start with Dooley Chapman, I'd say). Also a good number of amazing English Anglo recordings, old and new. If however you buy your concertina CDs only at typical Folk Revival-style music outlets, be prepared to listen to a lot of reels. I'm not sure that 'virtuosity' is always the best route. Sure, a professional player, or an unusually gifted player (or both) can do amazing things, but sometimes I get the feeling that in following such a person as an example/mentor, it tends to narrow one's playing, because most amateur folks who have a job and perhaps a family have little time for much else, musically. Going simpler and casting a broader musical net is another, though less travelled, path. Certainly the ancients....the nineteenth and early twentieth century players....were of that mindset, from what I have been able to hear in early recordings. Dooley Chapman, for example, played a variety of things from a variey of sources (English music hall, Irish, American minstrel, and local tunes), as did Scan Tester and (to some extent) Faan Harris. And they played in a simpler style that is quite approachable by anyone of average skills (well, ok, Faan Harris does do some gymnastics at times). In contrast, most of the Irish concertina virtuosos of today seem to be relatively monocultural in their tastes. Nothing wrong with that, one must say....they are emerging from a time not too long ago when that repertoire was under threat of disappearing....but their Irish predecessors of four generations ago played a broader repertoire, from what I can see (which is one reason the good Captain O'Neill ignored the concertina!). At that time, the concertina was not a "folk" instrument, and it was played in a far simpler way, regardless of what was being played. So vive la différence....as long as their remains a différence to vive. Dan makes some excellent points, so no brickbats folks! I think the limitations, if any, are twofold - the instrument, and the player. Piano accordions can do most anything in any key, so they are really only limited by the creativity and talent of the player. English concertinas can certainly do a world of different music, but the Anglo does present certain "challenges" in the way of key and chromaticity (can that color word be used for music?). If there is any limitation in the current Anglo repertoire I suspect it has more to do with the particular interests of the players. I picked up concertina because I love traditional British and Irish music, and don't really want to play old pop standards or Britney Spears, so, the tunes I play match the instrument quite well. But if anyone thinks the Anglo is limited, listen like Dan says to some of the South African stuff out there - especially any of the videos on YouTube posted by "Springbok07". They get some utterly amazing sounds out of those boxes! But, as awesome as all that is, I'll appreciate their efforts and keep learning and playing the English tunes I love so well! Gary
  12. Hi Gary I don't know who she is, but she's in quite a few videos. Here's one I found from Dec 2009. She also plays fiddle Chances are, if you search "Japan" and "This Forum", you'll find quite a few more. YouTube is really your friend. This is a filtered search result translating her name as Nakatou Tamotsu: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=videos&search_filter=0&suggested_categories=10&search_query=%E4%B8%AD%E8%97%A4%E6%9C%89%E8%8A%B1 And yes, all top notch playing. Thanks Leo The recent events in Japan have inspired me to listen to these YouTube videos again, and I can say with some certainty the Japanese girl playing anglo concertina is named Yuka Nakafuji. She's in a band called Tricolor, and also in the prog-rock folkrock band Voyager (but only plays fiddle). Looks like she's based in Tokyo, so hopefully was spared much of the earthquake damage. The other girl who plays piano accordian and Irish button accordion with her in several of the newer videos is Yuka Fujino, also in Tokyo. She plays in lots of bands - Handdlion, Rivendell, Jabara Shimai (The Bellows Sisters), and Jabara Rokushimai with 6 female piano accordian players. It looks like there are some CD's available from www.yukafujino.com, but it's hard tell much about them since Google really struggles with the translation. Here's hoping they are all safe and sound and playing music to cheer everyone up as best they can. Gary
  13. Although I've not personally seen Ms. McCarthy's Anglo, Harold Herrington is looking into making some 24-key Anglos and he told me the extra buttons on the left hand side are A#/C# (C row) and F#/G# (G row), and on the right hand side C#/D# (C row) and F#/C# (G row). I must say it makes a certain amount of sense to have the accidentals easily accessible to the index finger on both hands. And it would definitely be lighter than a full 30-button instrument. Gary
  14. If at all possible, I would highly recommend attending every concertina gathering you can find, be it the Northeast Squeeze-in, Concertinas at Witney, Bradfield, Old Palestine, etc. There's bound to be lots of players and lots of instruments at hand for trial and comparison. At last years Old Palestine Concertina Weekend we had instruments from just about every maker there is, old and new, and what a wonderful opportunity it was to hear and play all the different boxes, plus hear comments and recommendations from the owners. Gary
  15. 7th Annual Old Palestine Concertina Weekend - March 25-26, 2011, in Palestine, Texas In conjunction with the Palestine Old Time Music and Dulcimer Festival (www.oldpalmusic.com), we are once again organizing a big weekend of concertina workshops and events. This will be our 7th year! Our guest headliner this year will be Jody Kruskal, master of old-time music on the concertina, and he will be teaching several classes for Anglo and Old Time Music. Here is schedule for the concertina classes: For all systems: •Slow Jam (Nancy Bessent) •Tune Swap (Nancy Bessent) •Accompanying Tunes and Songs (Kurt Braun) •In the Footsteps of the Sally Army - Hymns for Concertina Bands (Ron Wilson) •Old Time Music for All Concertinas (Jody Kruskal) •Master Class with Jody Kruskal •Pachelbel's Canon in D (Ron Wilson & Gary Coover) •Construction & Repair with Harold Herrington Specifically for English Concertina: •Irish Tunes & Styling for English Concertina (Mark Gilston) Specifically for Anglo Concertina: •Old Time Music for Anglo - 1 (Jody Kruskal) •Old Time Music for Anglo - 2 (Jody Kruskal) •Third Row Anglo (Gary Coover) Jody has prepared some great old time tunes and teaching materials, including special mp3's both slow and fast. He always has a tremendous amount of energy and we are excited to have him back this year. The Third Row Anglo class is for those who have yet to venture beyond the C and G rows and will concentrate on chords and old English tunes. We have a wonderful tradition every year for all concertina players/spouses/families/partners/hangers-on - this year we will be having our dinner on Friday night at the newly rebuilt Ranch House Restaurant in downtown Palestine. This event is always great fun, with dinner music provided by anyone with a few solo tunes to share. It's our own mini-concert, and a great way for everyone to relax and enjoy the sounds of all the different types of concertinas. As in years past, we will have music from English, Anglo, Crane, Jeffries and Hayden duets. The classes are on Friday and Saturday in an old 3-story brick school building that will be full of old time musicians with their own classes and concerts, with old time jam sessions sprouting up all over the place at all hours of the day and night. Check out the line-up and schedule at www.oldpalmusic.com. Tickets are available at the front door, and there is an additional concertina surcharge of $30 to pay for Jody's travel arrangements. For more information, email gcoover(at)swbell.net.
  16. How about "Eastwell Park", as played by Andy Turner on Anglo International? It's 6/8, with a good English pedigree from c.1748.
  17. I'm pleased to announce the concertina workshops have now been finalized for the concertina portion of the Old Palestine Music Festival, and we have a great location reserved for our annual Concertina Dinner. So far we have over 15 confirmed attendees, and we know there will always be quite a few who show up the day of. If you are coming and you let me know which classes you're interested in, I'll make sure and send out any special music and mp3's so you can get an advance look or even a head start. If you play by ear, or consider yourself paper-trained, we've got you covered both ways. These concertina classes will be for all systems: Slow Jam (Nancy Bessent) Tune Swap (Nancy Bessent) Accompanying Tunes and Songs (Kurt Braun) In the Footsteps of the Sally Army - Hymns for Concertina Bands (Ron Wilson) Old Time Music for All Concertinas (Jody Kruskal) Master Class with Jody Kruskal Pachelbel's Canon in D (Ron Wilson & Gary Coover) Construction & Repair with Harold Herrington Specifically for English Concertina: Irish Tunes & Styling for English Concertina (Mark Gilston) Specifically for Anglo Concertina: Old Time Music for Anglo - 1 (Jody Kruskal) Old Time Music for Anglo - 2 (Jody Kruskal) Third Row Anglo (Gary Coover) Jody has prepared some great old time tunes and teaching materials, including special mp3's both slow and fast. He always has a tremendous amount of energy and we are excited to have him back this year. My class on Anglo is for those who have yet to venture beyond the C and G rows and will concentrate on chords and old English tunes. We have a wonderful tradition every year for all concertina players/spouses/families/partners/hangers-on - this year we will be having our dinner on Friday night at the newly rebuilt Ranch House Restaurant in downtown Palestine. This event is always great fun, with dinner music provided by anyone with a few solo tunes to share. It's our own mini-concert, and a great way for everyone to relax and enjoy the sounds of all the different types of concertinas. As in years past, we will have music from English, Anglo, Crane, Jeffries and Hayden duets. As we've mentioned previously, the classes are on Friday and Saturday in an old 3-story brick school building that will be full of old time musicians with their own classes and concerts, with old time jam sessions sprouting up all over the place at all hours of the day and night. Check out the line-up and schedule at www.oldpalmusic.com. Jerry and Margaret Wright do a great job of organizing a fun festival, and we're always excited to be part of it. Just let me know if you're planning on coming and I'll make sure you get on the confirmed email list for music and mp3's. Gary
  18. Does anybody know who the Japanese group is on these YouTube links? There's not much info on YouTube, and most of it is in Japanese. It looks like they're mostly a trio with two young girls playing anglo concertina and button accordian with a guy on piano accordian, but in other videos they are joined by two more girls playing uilleann pipes and harp. It's obviously recorded live at a gig somewhere, but the arrangements and playing are all top notch! Gary
  19. So far, we have at least 15 confirmed concertina players coming, and we're still two months away from the actual event - that's very exciting! We've got a good mix of English and Anglo, plus two Cranes and at least one Jeffries Duet. Still waiting to hear from any McCann Duet players. And there will be at least two English basses - we might have to work up the first ever concertina arrangement of "Big Bottoms" by Spinal Tap! We will be sending music and notes out shortly for those who have confirmed they will be attending, so if you haven't yet me know yet please do so in the next week. I'll also send out info about the really cool concertina t-shirt designed by professional artist Carol Lay from LA. As a sneak preview, Jody Kruskal is planning on teaching: Elk River in G Tombigbee Waltz in G Shove the Pig’s foot a little Further in the Fire in G Fly Around My Pretty Little Miss (Western Country) in D Tenessee Mountain Fox Chase in C I will be teaching a class on Third Row Anglo for those who might still be stuck on the C and G rows. Tunes will be Bobbing Joe in Dm, Leaping Jack in C, Herrington Hall in C, and a French Waltz in Dm. We're also planning on a class of 4-part hymns, perhaps one on ear training and arrangement, a slow jam or two for beginners, arrangements for duets, and once again we'll tackle the Pachelbel Canon in D for those who are paper-trained and adventurous. It's a pity Dan Worrall will be at his son's wedding elsewhere that same weekend. We offered them a concertina ceremony at Palestine but the offer was inexplicably declined. Probably something do to with the bride and groom hearing enough concertina from Dan at home? Dan's done such a great job organizing this event the past six years, we have some pretty big shoes to fill - he will definitely be missed. Dan, if you start having any withdrawal symptoms just phone in at any point and we'll conference in a tune. Sorry, but we're keeping all the good BBQ from Shep's to ourselves! More info soon as the workshops develop. Once again, let me know if you're coming and I'll make sure we send you the music out in advance. Thought for the day, from the words of Hugh O'Brian from a Bruce Lee movie on TV this week: "We ought to do some squeezing". Could Wyatt Earp's next movie be........wait for it........"Kung Fu Concertina"? Gary
  20. Bernard Wrigley used to joke about having to pour a pint of Guinness into his big bass English, but I don't think he recommended it for anyone else!
  21. I suppose it only goes off if someone tries to pick the lock? Otherwise, no protection at all from someone swiping the box and running off to open it later. I know we can be quite proud of our fancy cases that obviously hold something small and valuable (and easily grabbed), but the best solution I've seen yet is to put that nice case in a ratty old backpack. Easy to carry, and no one will ever suspect what's inside!
  22. Happy New Year and greetings to all! We are very excited to announce the 7th Annual Concertina Workshop in conjunction with the Palestine Old Time Music and Dulcimer Festival in Palestine, TX, to be held March 24, 25 and 26, 2011. You can check out the Old Pal website at: www.oldpalmusic.com. For those of you who have been before, you know how much fun it is spending two and a half full days and evenings of jam sessions, workshops, and concerts in the East Texas piney woods in springtime. If you haven't made it to Old Pal yet, the welcome mat is always out for concertina players of all types, from pre-beginner all the way to expert squeezer. In addition to a wonderful old building full of dulcimers, guitars, mandolins, fiddles and shape note singers, the concertina players commandeer a couple of rooms specially for concertina workshops, jams and good fellowship. This year's featured visiting concertina player is Jody Kruskal, renowned old time Anglo concertina player - yes, there really is such a thing! This will be his third time at the Old Pal Festival, and he will give four concertina workshops as well as appear in several concerts and jam sessions during the festival. His workshops will feature: • Old Time Music for All Types of Concertina • Old Time Music for Anglo Concertina • Master Class Check out his website at: www.jodykruskal.com for lots of news and great tunes. Do you have a concertina you don't know how to play? Are you thinking of getting a concertina? Are you just learning or are you already an expert player? Ever wanted to learn old time music on the concertina? How about the chance to play ensemble music just like the concertina bands of yore? Do you enjoy the opportunity to meet fellow players and enjoy listening or playing along? If so, then this festival is for you! The concertina workshops are in the final planning stages, so now is the time to send in any requests. We will have concertinas of all sizes and shapes and fingering systems - English, Anglo, Crane Duet, McCann Duet, Jeffries Duet, Hayden Duet, even a bass English, and who knows what else might show up. This is where you can see dozens of different concertinas all in one place, by just about every concertina maker imaginable. If you're thinking of getting a concertina, this is an excellent opportunity to look, learn and try the various types. A special treat will be a repair workshop with noted Texas concertina builder Harold Herrington, maker of Herrington Concertinas. He is always eager to share his vast knowledge of concertina construction and repair, and he usually brings an exciting new prototype to show us. Another favorite feature is our Concertina Banquet where concertina players with their spouses and friends dine together and then perform solo pieces for each other with all types of music on all types of concertinas. All of this is in addition to nightly and lunchtime concerts by scores of Old Time musicians who come to this festival from all over the US, and did I mention there are jam sessions going on all the time, everywhere, even after the main concerts? The two-and-a half day festival is only $70 ($140 for families), and there is and additional $30 to cover the concertina [/font]workshops and guest artist (Jody Kruskal). If you are planning on attending please let me know asap. Also let me know what type of concertina you play, and if there are any specific lessons or activities you'd like to see or participate in. We're a very egalitarian bunch who love to play and love helping others learn to play better, so no matter your skill level you're in good company. Please send me a message with your email address to confirm your interest - that will also place you on the email list for pre-distribution of sheet music for the workshops as well as logistics information, etc. And please pass this information along to anyone you know who might be interested. Last year we had about 20-25 concertina players from Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and even California. Hope to see you all at this year's festival! Gary Coover English, Anglo and Jeffries Duet
  23. Alan, I know Wheatstone EC, #19938, "48 Rosewood Steel Polished" from July/Sept 1881 has riveted steel reeds. For years I've played a wonderful unpolished rosewood 56 EC with riveted steel reeds. Unfortunately the only number is inside - "71" - probably a batch number or maybe the last two digits of the serial number? If it is the last two digits of a serial number, the only ones that might match in the ledgers are c.1888-1891. Gary
  24. In addition to meeting and hearing all the different players and styles, a special treat was the opportunity to see and hear lots of different concertinas by lots of different makers. In addition to English and Anglo we had Crane and Jeffries and Hayden duets, plus a bass English. There were concertinas by Wheatstone, Lachenal, Jeffries, Crabb, Dickinson, Dipper, Edgely, Tedrow, Herrington, Carroll, Morse, Stagi/Bastari, Chinese-made, and I'm sure I'm forgetting one or two. The thing that surprised me most was the Ensemble Workshop. Everytime we changed who played what part, the tunes sounded wonderfully different due to the different textures of each instrument. We tackled folk duets and trios, Sacred Harp classics like Evening Shade and Sons of Sorrow, plus some very unusual baroque arrangements of O'Carolan tunes by Douglas Gunn from Cork. Each time we switched the parts around, it was like hearing the tunes in an entirely new way. I just wish we could all get together more than once a year to experience such a great sound. And I'm still amazed how one guy with an Anglo was able to read music and keep up with everything - that'll teach me to not be so English-centric when I think about parts playing! Gary
  25. Just wanted to add a quick hello from a Jeffries Duet player in the lovely Arkansas Ozarks! C. Jeffries, 50-button, key of C, to be more particular. The analogy to a typewriter is very apt, since the keyboard is just about as logical. But we've all learned to type, so it's just a matter of getting used to its quirks. I've only found one other player here in the US who will admit to playing a Jeffries Duet, and that's the wonderfully entertaining Nick Robertshaw in the Washington, D.C. area. I know a few others who have duets, but they must be well closeted. The "Ramping Cat" album is indeed the definitive Jeffries Duet sound - "octaves in the right hand and fistfulls of chords in the left". Micheal Hebbert is absolutely brilliant. I heard that album and HAD to have a concertina that could sound like that. And I must say, I've never heard a MacCann or Crane make the same kind of racket. I suppose it should be of some concern that I enjoy playing an instrument that most people find to be incomprehensible... The best advice I can offer about learning to play the Jeffries Duet (or any other concertina), is to hide the case somewhere and leave the instrument out in your way - the sofa, the dining room table, etc. - and keep picking it up and having a go at it. Eventually you'll find you're throwing it down in disgust less and less, and playing real tunes more and more. It's like a big combination lock - find the right combination and out comes some lovely music! Gary Coover
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