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Rand

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    Western Colorado

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  1. Trying this again! I am selling my Stagi mini-English with 18-buttons, in like-new condition, with hard case (see photos). This instrument was acquired from the Button Box a few years ago and consequently passed through their “Stagi tuning and maintenance process” that includes checking for leaks, tuning all reeds, checking (and, if necessary, repairing) the action, adjusting valves, and adjusting the reed set. It plays very well and the action is smooth and tight (i.e., no loose buttons, nothing wobbly or rattling). New online they cost in the range of $595 to $649. I am asking $350 and will cover shipping. As noted above, it is in nearly new condition with only a few minor blemishes. I am selling this instrument because my hands are too big for it and I only rarely play it. Please let me know if you have questions, or would like sound clips or additional photos. I will donate 2 percent of the selling price to Concertina.net. Thanks!
  2. Just for fun (but also because I am curious about how prevalent concertinas and other squeezeboxes were in the early history of Colorado), I searched for "concertina" in the online Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection. There weren't a lot of hits, but the few I found are instructive (and often amusing). The attached clippings range from 1873 to 1914. I especially enjoyed "Reviving an Old Torture."
  3. I am selling my Stagi mini-English with 18-buttons, in like-new condition, with hard case (see photos). This instrument was acquired from the Button Box a few years ago and consequently passed through their “Stagi tuning and maintenance process” that includes checking for leaks, tuning all reeds, checking (and, if necessary, repairing) the action, adjusting valves, and adjusting the reed set. It plays very well and the action is smooth and tight (i.e., no loose buttons, nothing wobbly or rattling). At least one well-known online store is selling the same instrument for $649. I am asking $400 and buyer pays for the shipping. As noted above, it is in nearly new condition with only a few minor blemishes. I am divesting myself of this instrument because my hands are just too large for it and I hardly ever play it. Please let me know if you have questions. I will donate 2 percent of the selling price to Concertina.net. Thanks! Rand
  4. Any noticeable difference would be nice. I assume you can hear your voice over the instrument without undue yelling?
  5. Keith, How well do the baffles work? I had a Jackie but its voice was just too loud and strident for me. I tried adding wooden baffles but it did not seem to make a difference. Rand
  6. Rand

    Jackie For Sale

    This instrument is still available, if anyone is interested.
  7. Rand

    Jackie For Sale

    Francesca, I sent you a PM. Rand
  8. I have a Jackie English concertina for sale. This is the 2nd edition, purchased about two years ago. Like-new condition, as I haven't really played it very much. Comes with gig bag and tutor. $200 + shipping.
  9. Bob, I sent you a PM. Rand
  10. Hey Chris, I don't suppose you would be interested in reacquiring the one-row Gabbanelli in D that I purchased from you a couple of years ago??? It's a nice instrument but I think my experiment with diatonic push-pull accordions is nearing an end... Rand
  11. Ah, that takes me back a few years! Horslips was my introduction to Irish music as well. No one could call them traditional, but a couple of albums (Happy to Meet, Sorry to Part; Drive the Cold Winter Away) came pretty close see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horslips). I loved this band. They used to have a cult following and probably still do. By the way, I have two copies of the album you mention. It was what first got me interested in the concertina. Rand
  12. Dan, Thanks for pointing out this information. I have been to the exhibit; there is a small museum at the Jarvie homestead. But I don't remember a concertina nor any mention of his playing. I went through the exhibit pretty fast, though... was just in the area working. The Jarvie home is in a lovely setting, under cottonwoods right next to the Green River. Browns Park itself is one of the most remote places I've been in Utah (and I've been to some pretty remote areas). You can't really just pass through on your way to someplace else; it pretty much has to be your destination. Very interesting to think about Jarvie playing for local dances and social gatherings, or perhaps just sitting out under the cottonwoods in the evening with his concertina. Rand
  13. Wow, that's interesting. I've visited the Jarvie home in Browns Park but never realized he was a concertina player. I'm fairly certain, however, he was not Mormon. He arrived in the U.S. from Scotland in 1870 (aged 26 years) and by 1875 was running a saloon in Rock Springs, Wyoming. He moved with his new bride to Browns Park, Utah in 1880, where he ran a general store (selling liquor, among other things) and operated a ferry across the Green River. He knew Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid quite well, as Browns Park was a famous outlaw hideout. Incidentally, his saloon in Rock Springs was said to provide "vaudeville type entertainment." I wonder if he ever played his concertina there? The above information, by the way, is from the book John Jarvie of Browns Park, by William L. Tennent. Rand
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