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slatteryj

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  1. "It sounds as if the reedblock for the B row has worked loose, or even been shifted sideways. This is quite common after a trip through a parcel delivery service! I'm assuming since you mention the I word that its a B/C!" Theo That sounds very plausible. How would I know if the reedblock had shifted, will it be obvious what the original position was ie markings? John
  2. I recently purchased a lovely second hand Saltarelle melodeon and the only flaw is a prob with 2 buttons (F# & C# - needed for irish music which I play) in both push and pull mode. I removed the front grill to see if I could spot valves as per my concertina to see if air could be leaking through bu only saw the pads and levers. Questions: How do I get further into the instrument to see reeds/valves? The bellows is secured by pins/rivets? What else could cause the weak sound? It might be coincidence, but why the C# and F#, could it be a usage thing ie they were used allot for Irish music and have the reeds have weakend or valves worn ? I would really welcome any advice or insight John S.
  3. Lovely 30 Key Lachenal Anglo Concertina (Excelsior model) Ornate Rosewood ends, 6 fold bellows, C/G, steel reeds, bone buttons, lightweight and sounds great, played regularly, selling to fund purchase of a Wheatstone. Price is £1000 - I am based in the UK
  4. I play Irish music on my angle but I don't half get my fingers in a twish when I tackle the more complicated reels. I am self taught and to a small extent I use alternative keys for a bellows efficient approach. I have been looking at ways of improving my taecnique and style. I have just enquired about attending a Noel Hill course in Ireland and unfortunately I am unable to make the dates. In the course overview it mentioned that students can expect to learn fingering patterns for scales and ornamentation. Is there a document on the web or another way for me to get this or similar information so that I can learn myself. I would be grateful for any information or direction setting Thanks, John
  5. Please Help! I have been to another session last night and I have reached the end of my teather with my constant struggling with trying to hear my Wheatstone over the mass of fiddles and melodions. I currently play a beautiful fully restored mahagony ended Linota which I love. It has superb action and tone, but a concertina that cannot be heard in a session is not earning its way. I have thought about buying a new-new instrument for a couple of years and for every year that I procrastinate, I become 1 year further from what I want and need. I want to order a Dipper or a Suttner as I know they come with a reasonable guarantee of volume as well as in all the other quality criteria. I am aware of the waiting times and I know the prices are not too dissimilar. Has anyone played both and what are you opinions regarding volume, and particularly the extent to which you loose quality of sound in order to achieve volume. Are they 'too loud' in a session? Does the harshness impact 'very' significantly when playing slow airs? I would greatly appreciate the benefits of any experience that any of you have with regard to these instruments. I live in Reading, Berkshire, England. Is there anyone local to me who had a Dipper/Suttner, I would love to visit for a cup of tea and to hear your concertina. I would bring 'chocolate biscuits'. I am also partial to a nice stout or ale! Thanks for reading John
  6. Ref Jims comment "I wonder if some of the other repairers/restorers and historians could help us with their own experience and conclusions on this matter. In particular, if I'm correct, can anyone document when this feature was introduced or became standard? " I have just purchased a Wheatstone Linota and will be taking delivery in the next 2 weeks (just can't wait). It has mahagony ends and no bushings - see picture. I am really intrigued to find out if this model is a standard Linota with 'plain' ends or something else. I would love to hear your thoughts. Does anyone have contact with Colin Dipper, maybe they could contact him - I have heard he is the expert in Wheatstone technology.
  7. Thank you Goran and Richard, some very thorough and informativ answers. Such a small instrument yet so much to learn, even down to the 6-8 different types of glues to use. I look forward to using this new found knowledge. Happy Christmas to you all J.
  8. I am trying to locate musicians in the Reading, Berkshire area with a view to getting a new Irish Trad session happening on a regular basis. Is there any interest out there? Are you aware of any regular sessions in this area that are currently happening? J.
  9. I read in a previous posting that only non-permanent glues should be used when making repairs to a concertina. Q. What form of glues are recommended and how are they used? Q. How are these joints then taken apart afterwords for subsequent repair? John S.
  10. I have a question regarding assessing the quality of concertinas. There are so many assumptions made about certain types of instruments. Does having coarse fretwork on a Jeffries or Wheatstone Linota mean that the quality of the reeds, sound or action is inferior to those same makes with highly ornate fretwork. Is it possibe that the reeds and mechanisms are identical but just with plain ends? If this is correct, why would they put a cheaper end on a premium instrument? Or could it mean that some Jeffries or Linotas were made to lesser specifications throught the instrument. Hmmm J.
  11. I have a question regarding assessing the quality of concertinas. There are so many assumptions made about certain types of instruments. Does having coarse fretwork on a Jeffries or Wheatstone Linota mean that the quality of the reeds, sound or action is inferior to those same makes with highly ornate fretwork. Is it possibe that the reeds and mechanisms are identical but just with plain ends? If this is correct, why would they put a cheaper end on a premium instrument? Or could it mean that some Jeffries or Linotas were made to lesser specifications throught the instrument. Hmmm J.
  12. Can someone tell me what impact replacing brass reed shoes with aluminium shoes will have on sound quality and performance. These are the screw and clamp variety and not the pinched reed type shoes.
  13. Lovely 30 Key Lachenal Anglo Concertina (Excelsior model) Ornate Rosewood ends, 6 fold bellows, C/G, steel reeds, bone buttons, lightweight and sounds great, played regularly, selling to fund purchase of a Wheatstone. Price is £1100 plus shipping - I am based in the UK
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