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Hooves

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Everything posted by Hooves

  1. all these suggestions are interesting and seem workable, but unless you have some software for actaully transposing to the alternate staves, won't you have to manually re-write the music for these additional staves? I'm thinking of playign already written music, which frequently comes as treble/bass. I try to get away from the written music once I have learned a song (at least for my other instruments, for example the tune "Maggie Lauder" I can play on my guitar, learned it from music written on the treble staff). If you want to play in an orchestra, thats a different situation, where the players almost exclusively play from the score. Once you have the tune memorized, it won't matter how its written out.
  2. sort of Isolation: I live in a cracker box apartment, so technically I'm never really playing in isolation. My neighbors sometimes chuck things at the wall or my floor (thier roof), but they seem to like my instrumental guitar/mandolin playign better than the tina or vocals. Right now I live in the most god forsaken horrible domicile imaginagble, festering with foul stench from the grotesque non-stop smoke-house run below me, and the thudding drum beats from 2 units over that pulsate through the cardboard walls. I haven't been playing long enough to get up in front of an audience with the box, though I have hit open mic night with my guitar/octave mandolin. I'm working ona set to play, but right now I ahve no mics for my tina and I doubt very much the "sound man" would be able to accomadate a concertina. ------------ edited to be less offensive, my apologies
  3. Hooves

    Crane Duet

    a few months ago I got a nicely restored 48K Crane for less than that. I discovered the problem with my lower notes was in fact my amateurish playing, although they are somewhat slower than the notes on my Macaan (on the very low end), I just have been to gentle with it and playing harder now, the notes don't seem quite as slow, I finanly got brave enough to open it, and I may have loosed up some dust or other debris. Do "valves" need to be broken in too? I wouldn't think so.
  4. You just need to start practising your tunes more, and less scales. Its the same for any intrument, at some point you need to stop practising scales and focus on actual music. I try learn my songs in 2-4 bar phrases. If you keep fumbling the tune, take a break and improvise for awhile.
  5. Hooves

    Crane Duet

    No, model 70 should be correct. I haven't checked the price list collection on concertina.com lately, but I don't think the early price lists gave model-number specifics for any but the Englishes, though such numbers were used internally in the ledgers. E.g., I think numbers below 30 were for Englishes, numbers in the 30's (and 40's?) for (Maccann) duets, numbers in the 50's for anglos, in the 70's for Triumph system. My impression has been that the one-digit-with-a-letter (e.g., 3A, 5E, 2D, 2T, etc.) model designations completely replaced earlier 2-digit model numbers after WWII. (In that system, "D" would designate a Maccann duet; a Triumph/Crane would end in "T".) But on the same ledger page as this one that's for sale is a "9E" model designation for #33499. That's strange, especially since I didn't think the later system went up to 9. Check that auction again, under questions KerryF has lent some "useful" information..
  6. ah the Uilleann pipes, who among you cannot say they dream of being a Uilleann pipe player? of all the pipes I ahev heard, I like the Uilleann the best, but alas I'm a strummer, peasant lutes are my forte. Good luck findign that box, with capital like that you ought to be able to find avery nice tina indeed.
  7. I have been working on learning the standard treble and bass clefs simply becuase almost all the music I have in printed form has been notated in treble/bass. I do like the idea though of the treble/treble octave, that actaully makes alot of sense to me, but I think I will stick to treble/bass just so that when I get up enough nerve to play with other people, I will be on the same page. One of my many hobbies is programming: I have been kickign around the idea of writing up a program to read MIDI files, display the notes on the staff as well as the buttons on the Crane/MacCaan duet. This way If i get a piece I want to learn, I can have it light up the buttons I need to push. and the opposite, push the buttons and have it populate the staff. It would be a tool for people to use to learn the Duet and to compare/contrast the Crane and MacCaan fingerings. I have been thinking of just writing it as a plugin for another piec eof sofwtare such as PowerTracks or Band ina Box. But right now its just an idea, and now that you mention the other clefs, I can see the value in providing alternate methods of representing the staff notes.
  8. Indeed - I made leaps and bounds in my playign when I started playing a duet, theres no going back for me. listen to the Anglo players whine and lament for C# or too many D's, or whatever note is missing to play whatever tune it is they desire at the moment. Be brave, be bold, step forward and step up - DUET! You shall never regret it young box player, if old foolish Hooves can learn to play it, than anybody can... Cranes Rock!
  9. sort of like seeing BigFoot ??? next time bring your dart gun.
  10. Hey Tootler Most of the profiles on the left have at least which continent we're from. Or this might help: <a href="http://www.frappr.com/concertinaplayers" target="_blank">http://www.frappr.com/concertinaplayers</a> Last time I looked there were over 350 spots on the map. Blue for Anglo, Red for English, White for Duet, Yellow for Other, and Green for More than one type. thats great! actually I would have guessed there were more players in my region, looks like I'm unique (at least in California) as I always suspected.
  11. More wisdom there than I am sure a lot of folks would want to admit. Dad always said most folks went to university because they weren't bright enough to work construction. It really depends on what skills your comparing, and how you define "intelligence". There are scientists making discoveries everyday that 100 years ago would have won them a noble prize and got thier names in the history books, but we are far removed from their work: don't say people are getting stupider when in fact science is rolling forward. Despite having calulators and computers to do our differential equations, despite having centuries worth of knowledge at our finger tips, the ability to actaully utilize the knowledge in a useful, brilliant way, is still a fleeting hope for the majority, as it always has been, and now the bar is higher than ever in recorded history. I don't believe people are getting stupider, its just that inate stupidity is becoming more obvious: Kind of like comparing two shades of "white". Not to long ago we were blood letting to cure a cold, swearing the Earth was flat, and drinking water out of intentionally radioactive jugs... anybody today would call that stupid. We have more information, more knowledge than ever before, the fact that people don't take advantage of it doesn't mean they are stupider, just perhaps lazier (and ruder no doubt), and with such a broad base of subjects to study, the "Reniassance Man" really has his hands full. and somebody out there is feeding that data base... if you think I'm an ignorant loud mouth I can tell you this - in California I'm a friggin Genius and one halo short of Sainthood.
  12. I keep my thumb outside, it just felt more natural to do it that way, easier to hold the box(for me at least). On my little Giordy button accordion, I have difficulty with the bass side, I think I should have gotten a left hand version as I find it so much easier to play it left handed rather than right handed (although I am right handed), but if I do it that way hitting the air button is near impossible, so lately I have been trying to play it "the right way" which has become rather frustrating.
  13. I played guitar and mandolin for 18 years before picking up a concertina, pinky use on my left hand is almost a neccessity in my mind, in the last few years I have migrated away from finger picks, and now use my pinky on the right much more often (last 6 or so months Ive been studying Adrian Legg, Michael Hedges, Al Petteway, and Nick Drake, most definately they have influenced my playing, including much more pinky use on the right hand, though I still use pick al ot too). On my Crane, I use the pinky on both sides frequently, however since I'm still learning, and I don't have any solid "do this don't do this" mentoring, I'm still a bit fumbly. They say learning one foreign language helps you learn another more easily, I would imagine the same is true for musical instruments, at least you have the foundations of music under your belt.
  14. Hooves

    Crane Duet

    I think about 6 months ago or so I saw a Crane with brass reeds listed, was tempted to buy it but I had already sunk money into a MacCaan duet or else would have bid on it. The price right now is not too bad, I would expect it to sell even as is for over 500 GBP since so many peopel want Cranes these days (and for good reason, Crane rocks!)
  15. I think you are very fortunate to be able to attend sessions in County Clare, someday when I win the lottery, I'll visit the emerald isle: it would be nice to visit at least once the heartland of Irish box playing.
  16. Wait till the bars close, and then the Duet vote will roll in...
  17. well actaully I agree with you: I only tried playing an EC for a short time, and in that time I was playing a rather oafish chinese box. I was still trying to learn, so, I believed players made use of that pinky rest more frequnetly. But I see your point, I jumped to a conclusion too quickly - I was just trying to establish a reason why they choose to use anglo style vs EC style hand rests, and I immediately thought of how much I need to use my pinky to hit notes. So that kind of leaves the question why then do Duets have anglo style hand rests? I think the anglo style hand rest works pretty well, but, I'm certianly not as expierenced as most people on this forum. It works for me. ------------ added: I compared my low C on my MaCaan to the Low C on my Crane: The Macaan note is sounding much faster than the Crane, so I will pull out my Dave Elliot book and see if anything really simple could be causing a problem, hopefully its not a gap issue and maybe just dust or sticking valves: I haven't opened the Crane up since I didn't want to take any chance of screwing it up, but now its time to do it.
  18. It may be a personal thing but I like the anglo type straps on my 55 button crane. I have an english system concertina and sometimes play it, but in some way it feels like my hands are caged, keeping thumb and pinky in a straitjacket. Marien I think Marien nailed it as to why its not more prevalent to have the EC style thumb/pinky rests: you need to have that pinky free - my limited expierence with the duet has shown me how important the pinky is, I need it to hit the furthest rows and still hit notes on the other rows. For example, if you were hitting just the accidentals (black keys) on a crane, you need to hit both extremes of the instrument which would be difficult with just the inner 3 fingers. Thanks Geoff for the info on the low notes, it may very well be the reed has shifted in transport, my box had to come along ways to get to me, and had to go through the US border/customs. all my other notes are fine, just once I get below middle c, there is a gradual slow down till the lowest C, although they all sound in tune (to me at least...).
  19. I have a 48K crane, on my box the lowest octave is very slow to sound, so slow I ahve thought it migth be btetr to just end a few notes before the lowest C, reaching my upper notes even on the 48K is a bit of a stretch and hard to hit them precisely in the upper most register (but thats just me on my box, other boxes and players may find those notes easier to hit and sound). It looks like it would be rough hitting that range of notes, do any of the players of these 70-80 key Cranes have some insight and how or even if they use this extended range?
  20. Shivering, I reached for a torch thinking the power had gone out, my breath clouding in the air, I brushed the tiny icicles from my beard. I looked around my flat and noticed a layer of snow on the draw rug: half stuttering as I rubbed a clear spot on the bathroom mirror I surveyed my now frosty bluish horns. Checking the thermostat, ah yes, I see the problem: An anglo player complaining about one two many D notes... -------------------- Just teasing all you double winded anglo players
  21. Ouch! we can learn much from the mistakes of others: sometimes its good to learn what "Not to do"...
  22. I was fortunate to see John Williams play last year at the Sebestapol Celtic Festival. I overheard him talkign to an audience member, and remember him saying he enjoyed teaching people to play, so maybe you might even be able to get lessons from the master himself. I think he lives in Chicago, so you may have a bit of a commute unless you live there too. Can't even imagine what a 5 times world champion concertina player charges per lesson.
  23. Does that mean you use a lot of fertilizer in your arrangements?
  24. It sounds very sound track like, I can picture scenes from a black and white mystery or horror movie from yesteryear.
  25. Bobb Webb would know, he's a scholar of sea-faring music, he plays a McCaan Duet, which can be heard on a few tunes on his sea music CD (I can't remember the title right now, but he has a web site). Bobb is also a well known banjo player and historian, I suspect if anybody knows about concertina and the sea, it would be Bobb. I have seen pictures of sailors with concertinas, will try to find some and post the links. Maybe its not really a "style" you are refferign too, but rather a body of forecastle songs played by sailors or others witha nautical interest. With all the salt air, I'm not sure those steel reeds would hold up all that well on prolonged voyages. maybe the brass reeds would be more prevalent, but I'm just guessing on that so don't go flaming me again m3838 and Jim (and the rest of you unruly button pushing vagrants!)... I think there is a type of music called something like Comoso, I remember it being mentioned in a documentary I saw on a re-enactment of a historic voyage which i believe ended in New Foundland. There is definately a style of playing Button Accordion related to New Foundland, in fact if you search on Ebay there is a dvd you can buy to learn it, plus think of the traditional/pop-rock band "Great Big Sea".
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