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Ted.

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Everything posted by Ted.

  1. Hi Daddy Long Les, My respect to you for developing a beginner-friendly tablature system. Although myself prefer the ordinary musical notation, I think it is a great idea to help people get started on playing the instrument and I would love to see it succeed. Just would like to share my feelings about the system and some suggestions. (And quite nervous being the first one to send a reply...) To begin with, the numbers in the cells are a bit distracting to me. I could understand that there are some tricky fingerings in some tunes, but most of the time the finger to use to play a note is pretty "standard"? I think taking that element out and just remind at certain difficult parts would be enough? Another thing is, I found it requires a bit of thinking to figure out which row to play on. The last one is just a suggestion. Since at any point of time the bellows can only travel in one direction, any chance we can put the information into the "Bellows" column so that we can share some responsibility to it and let the cells focus on delivering other instructions. I thought about how to "fix" the 3 things above, so I experimented it in Excel. Using triangles to denote which row to play on may be more intuitive? Remove those finger numbers and add them only for difficult phrases? Move the direction to bellows column? The first 3 bars are pretty much a direct translation of yours, while the last bar is different just to show the concept: Lastly, just want you to know that what you have done is wonderful! Please keep going! Cheers, Ted
  2. Hello all, sorry to have disappeared for quite a while. Thanks very much for your replies and they are inspiring. My initial thought was - a G/D box has a range that is a better match with other instruments, such as flute or pipes. The combination as well puts F#, G, A, B, which are 3rd to 6th of D, on the magical direction-changing pairs of buttons that add colour to the playing. However, in above thinking I have unconsciously assumed that Irish tunes always have D as root note, which is clearly not true. Another fact is that melodies are not bounded by rules but go freely as they like (the fascinating part of ITM). Turns out on a G/D box, the right hand will get super busy as the notes go from G4 to A4, B4 then C5 and higher. In contrast, a C/G box works with the "normal" playing range much better, with G4 - G5 easily accessible while none of the hands is overloaded. The most interesting part about this tiny little instrument is, that led me to think about a D/A box which looked even better! Only when I looked again the button layout of C/G, it is basically a D/A with natural G if we swap push and pull...... (BTW, thanks TapTheForwardAssist for the great video from Tim. Though the melodeon button layout freaked me out...)
  3. Good day to all, a beginner question again... I have learned that C/G anglo is the most suitable layout for ITM and didn't really question it until recently. I don't know why suddenly I couldn't get my head around it, but when I look into tunebooks it seems most of the common session tunes are in key of G or D, and just a few in key of C or A. Why wouldn't a G/D anglo, if we are talking about 20 button ones, be more suitable than a C/G anglo? Cheers, Ted
  4. I came across the same problem last week when I was replacing the springs. I made a new hole next to the original one with a 1 mm drill bit.
  5. No worries, no one should be blamed! As you said, people can't see who is trying to give reply on online forums so it does happen. Thanks very much for your advice (I got the same advice from Peter Smith as well) and I am planning to order the book online. Luckily the problem could be fixed by replacing the parts but I am sure that I will need the book sometime. I would say the most difficult part as a first-timer was to actually remove the screws and start looking into the internals. But once done it, it's much more fun than simply playing the instrument.
  6. Hi everyone, Here are some updates about the problem though it seems the question was too dumb to get any reply... A month after posting here, I ordered a repair kit from Mark Lloyd-Adey and it arrived a couple months back (Good to know that Mark is recovering!). As my little one was born recently, I didn't manage to start the repair work only until now. I spent about 4 hours to replace all the valves, springs and pads on the bass side. The glue I used was Elmer's glue all. Not sure if it is a good choice but at least it is not permanent. It seems the buzzing problem was solved after doing this, although some more adjustments are needed for the fifth button on G row, which I had to bend the spring a little bit to fit into the limited space. Now I am thinking whether I should work on the treble side as well even it seems to be doing fine. Another thing is the baffles seems to be not attaching to the wood quite well, so I might need to work out how to glue it back on correctly. Anyway, this is good experience understanding the inside of a concertina and fortunately I didn't ruin it! Thanks and have a nice day. Ted
  7. Hi everyone, I am new to concertina and would like to have some advices from you on fixing air leak. The problem is with my Lachenal 20b anglo. I can hear air coming out from somewhere when I pull/push without pressing on any button, including the air button. I think the "somewhere" was the 3rd button of C row on the left and not on the bellow. This button has some buzzy noise since the first day but air was not leaking until recently. I am quite sure that there is no repairer in my country and due to the current situation I might not be going to the UK soon, where I can find repairers. That's why I would like to try fixing it by myself. It will be great if I can have some advices from you on what probably went wrong, and how I can further check and start fixing it. Thank you.
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