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Gail_Smith

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About Gail_Smith

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Interests
    English. mainly traditional tunes - working on adding in more twiddles/chords/harmonies at the moment.
  • Location
    Wirral, UK

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  1. Thank you to everyone for your help on this. I now have a workable concertina again. I eventually used the 1" woodscrews kindly sent to me by a member of this forum. Thanks ! They are a little thicker than the originals, but that will help them stay put. They have gone in OK and don't seem to have damaged the posts, and I decided to live with the difference in length between the thumb and finger screws. If they had failed I would have used the machine screws, nuts and washers. what a helpful forum ! Hope you are well Dave. Gail
  2. thanks ! Not easy to figure out what the best search terms for an internet search are. I spent a lot of time on model-making and dolls house websites.
  3. I will try the machine screw option first, and the second (your suggestion of a post, screwing into both ends) if I split the wooden post while installing the machine screws. A nylon (rather than brass) post looks like an option. I hope to be replacing other smaller (rusted) screws at the same time - it looks like I will be having Pozidrive heads to everything eventually. I'm sure Mr. Lachenal - as an engineer - would approve of Pozidrive screws, and wish he had invented them. Thank you so much, both of you, for your really helpful suggestions. Gail
  4. goodness--- i didn't want to make people leave.... sorry
  5. I'm having trouble finding suitable woodscrews for replacing those that hold the plates on to my ediophone. They go through the plate or thumbstrap, down through a wooden post (post is about 13mm long) and then through - and out the other side even - the wooden plate through which all the valve holes are cut out.. Multiple repairs and over the years (all of which require these screws to be removed), and some rusting on the screws has resulted in damage to the heads. The "slot" at the top of the screws are now damaged and so its increasiungly difficult to remove and replace them. I suspect the use of the "wrong size" of screwdriver has also contributed (I have no idea what the "right size" would be... presumably the one Mr. Lachenal used in his workshop ). Anybody got any ideas where I can get x4 replacement screws? My internet searches have been unsuccessful - but maybe I am not using the right keywords. Approx 1 mm diameter 25 mm long thread on the bottom 12 mm countersunk I would also like to replace the shorter screws holding the thumbstrap and finger unit in place. thank you Gail
  6. why is it important for us to declare our gender before discussing concerinas on this forum ?
  7. think I have almost got the hang of this. Thanks
  8. Thank you so much. I'm sure mine was not orange ! Gail
  9. Hello, I have bought the paper version of the above tunebook twice, and have foolishly lent it to someone-unknown and the replacement was "lost in the post" (along with a lot of my other dots...), so I feel as if i have some sort of "moral right" to the book even though i don't currently own a copy! . I am now trying to go digital , and Googling identifies several places where I could download it - but none of them work for me. Does anyone know where it might be available as pdfs please ? than you Gail
  10. the classic tune that everyone (?) knows is the irish washerwoman. The type of thing I'm trying to explain is in bars 5 and 6 of the B music, where i would want to only "just touch the string" for the repeated g. Its easier to do when the "light touch" note is higher then the melody (as here) because the higher notes do not sound as loud as the lower ones with similar pressure. But other tunes (or indeed this one, if you use the G an octave lower) have the repeated note lower than the melody line - often requiring changes of which finger you have to use on the button to accommodate the rest of the tune. I do use the "drone" approach a bit when the repeated notes are higher than the melody (I like drone music- i play the hurdy-gurdy - badly- as well as the concertina) but i think they overpower the melody if used for lower notes. I can manage different volumes with the repeat notes, using bellows pressure, when playing slowly - but slowly isn't how these tunes are played in the Liverpool/UK part of the world. Too fast for me to exchange fingers for them, never mind getting different emphasis on the second and third notes. I will experiment with shortening notes/not opening the valve fully and see if i can get that to work. More practice needed (as always). Thank you for comments so far. Gail
  11. the classic tune that everyone (?) knows is the irish washerwoman. The type of thing I'm trying to explain is in bars 5 and 6 of the B music, where i would want to only "just touch the string" for the repeated g. Its easier to do when the "light touch" note is higher then the melody (as here) because the higher notes do not sound as loud as the lower ones with similar pressure. But other tunes (or indeed this one, if you use the G an octave lower) have the repeated note lower than the melody line - often requiring changes of which finger you have to use on the button to accommodate the rest of the tune.
  12. Daniel - how would you describe what you do please? And is it a different thing that you do on the anglo to the duet when trying to get this effect - or the same sort of thing?
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