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Simon Rosser

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About Simon Rosser

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  • Birthday 10/17/1954

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    simon.p.rosser@btinternet.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Woodford Green, Essex. UK

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  1. Looks like a beauty David and I'm lucky enough to have one just like it. If I didn't, I'd be after this one. You're quite right about idiosyncratic button placement on Jeffries' boxes. As soon as we stray away from the usual home keys, your box and mine have many differences and the layout differences between my G/D & C/G 46 key machines (despite being two ostensibly similar layouts) beggar belief! Sounds like I'm complaining but I ain't! What fabulous instruments they are and How lucky we are to have them
  2. Thanks Alex, I'll give it a go! Well, whaddya know - more than me, obviously! THank you Alex
  3. Hi Ted & Ken, My thanks to you both. I'm not in any urgent hurry to sell the box so would you think re-listing on Ebay for longer the best thing to do or to see if Concertina.net will do the trick? I'm open to any suggestions and i have plenty of time. Simon
  4. Hi All, I'd welcome a bit of input here please folks. I had thought this (£4k) a reasonable price for a top quality instrument but may be I'm over-egging it a bit? It didn't sell on Ebay so I'd be glad to know what my fellow boxers think? Please let me know? Thanks Simon Rosser
  5. Afternoon all, I have just posted the above instrument on Ebay. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/-/271978494887? First time I've done this but if sold on this site, the usual donations will apply. Simon Rosser
  6. Hi Mike, All the above chaps are being jolly helpful. I'm with Danersen however in suspecting this would have been a slightly limited instrument as a duet. One of the best Jeffries duettists I ever knew was a chap called Chris Beale when he and I both danced with Chingford Morris in the seventies. He owned two machines - each with 88 keys if I remember right - and was a brilliant player of just about anything from folk to ragtime to classical pieces. I don't for a moment doubt those who say these were occasionally adapted from duet to anglo but I have two such boxes - each with 46 keys and, so far as I can tell, neither has been altered in this fashion so I can only conclude they were both Anglos from birth as it were. When I first got the G-D 46key (whose history is listed elsewhere on this site) It was fairly knackered so I took it in about 1972 to Dave and Neville Crabbe in Islington Road. They told me it was an anglo and always had been and I've never had cause to doubt it. Now, old man Jeffries was a chap with an eye to the main chance so who's to say he didn't come up with a catch-all design whereby one layout could be sold as either system? If yours is an anglo, it's certainly worth a good deal more than a duet of this size would be. That's because they are so versatile. You can still play with all the usual anglo punch for the Morris but the entended keyboard allows far greater opportunity for legato playing, with wider chord variety and extra flexibility in bass runs, making the instruments great for song accompaniment. At some point I shall be selling one myself as I don't really use the C-G 46key as much as I ought or thought I would. Don't sell before you know exactly what you have and, if sell you must, try to ensure it goes to someone who can and will play. There are too many collectors out there who can't and don't play and there are too many good players out there waiting for an instrument such as this, who never get their hands on one. Good luck!
  7. Hi Rachel, May I suggest you contact Mike Acott who has been trying to post on this site for the last couple of days in order to get in touch. His number is 01473-743080 and email; nikiacott@hotmail.com. He'll be able to help you with regard to cost, repairs and value etc.
  8. Ah the temptation ... But no , my lips are sealed until, let us say, next February. Chris I can hardly wait as I've been researching the annals with Samantha and she has kindly allowed me to use the little known Thread Drift Inversion on which the Smyth-Barton Infraction has absolutely no bearing. Therefore at almost every stage of the game (with the obvious exception of the occurence of the Woodford Conundrum) I shall be able to go "Conkerfosters" with out fear of Knip or frayed string. Simes
  9. When I was at college and suffering the then normal penury, I occasionally used to busk at central london tube stations and, in the summer, in various parks. I always did quite well and though I occasionally got moved on it was always in a polite fashion. Playing a concertina certainly got me noticed and (I like to think) earnt me a bit more than say a guitarist. It was louder anyway! When out with friends from school or college, my box generally went with me and in only a few pubs was I ever asked to desist. Most landlords in those days welcomed a bit of music and the Morris side were welcome everywhere. I was never offended by the few who didn't appreciate or want the music. I simply shut up and got on with my beer! This is sadly not so often the case now and I rarely think to take my box with me unless we're playing at an organised function or an increasingly rare music pub. I've heard a lot recently about a requirement for a licence in order to perform like this nowadays and I'm saddened if this is truly the case. Music is a real gift to all of us whether as players or as audience and anything that restricts its appearance in public life serves only to render us all the poorer. I suspect that the occasional strange looks from passers by are more frequent simply because fewer people play and I've often had passing folk engage me in conversation, the general theme of which appears to be "I wish I could play". I'm no hotshot player by any means but I'm grateful to be able to play and suspicious of anything, institution or person that would restrict the proliferation of music in our society. Keep on playing! Simes
  10. I, in common with many of the above correspondents, find DPM's ideas on this subject a little baffling. I started with a little red plywood 20key machine and it was sufficient for about two weeks. I got hold of a 26key lach and was told when I took this along to morris, that it was already limiting my ability to play - something I felt myself. A linota followed and I got the same advice " If you really want to play find yourself a Jeffries" When I eventually did so, the upturn in my playing ability was remarkable and immediate. Moreover, the instrument itself made demands on me to improve. My playing of the Linota also improved. There is no doubt at all that I did not deserve my Jeffries when I first got it nor that without it my playing would not have improved as it did. DPM would probably not have allowed it me in the first place and would probably want it confiscated in the second. I have played for about thirty years or so both professionally and as an amateur and I know that apart from pleasing me, my music has given pleasure to others. I may not be the finest player of an anglo in the world but my playing, such as it is, is made all the better for having the instruments I love and appreciate. I suspect that DPM's assertion about older beginners or "casual fans of the concertina" (what? who are these?) buying and not using quality boxes - for which they have had to pay very good money - is largely twaddle. Where I have some sympathy for him and others is when I hear of collectors who are not players. I believe that instruments are there to be played and, speaking as a restorer for a moment, they quite definitely deteriorate if they are not! I am now in my early fifties and still improving. I have a G/D, a Bb/F and a C/G Jeffries, all of which I play regularly. My other half has my instructions to make sure, on my death, that my boxes go to someone who really wants to play. I think I'll tell her to make an exception in DPM's case! Oh, and in case anyone's interested as to the source of my advice all those year ago.... John Watcham was that man and it would have been churlish - not to say stupid - of me to ignore the wise words of such an exponent as he! Simon Rosser
  11. The instrument as shown on ebay has only two rows (1 Octave) per side but I know that Mike Acott has one which has four rows (2 Octaves) per side. He recently took it to Whitney and a keyboard player picked it up and began playing with absolutely no difficulty - despite not being able to use his thumbs! As I'd never come across one before I would be interested to know its likely value? Any guesses from the boxers out there? Simon Rosser
  12. My first good anglo was a "linota" - a sweet voiced box - in Bb-F and I sold it to a mate some years ago. It was an ebony ended 30 key and a cracking instrument. I used it for several years when playing with Keith Dignam in "Pickled Dill". I'm sorry to say that I pulled the end out of the instrument at a gig while singing the Norton New Bell Wake. It required extensive and expensive repairs!! I recently met my mate again and found that he had done nothing with the instument since buying it from me twenty years ago and I bought it back from him in a sad state and am in the process of rebuilding it. In my opinion "Linotas" are among the best anglos of their time so, if you get hold of one, enjoy it! Cheers! Simon Rosser
  13. When I was playing and dancing with Chingford Morris in the seventies, one of our members, a certain Chris Beale, had two Jeffries system duets one in Bb and one in C. I think they were both about 56 or 58 Keys each. Certainly they were heavy enough to require a neck strap! He is rumoured to be still with us and presumably still playing though I haven't heard of him for some time. A delightful bloke, he was then a particularly accomplished player and a wonderful exponent of Scott Joplin tunes. I have no idea whether they were C.J. machines or J. Bros. though I suspect the former. So there's another two to add to the count! I shal watch this one with interest!!! Simon Rosser
  14. Hello Ian, How nice to hear from you. When Charlie gave me the 46 key G-D Jeffries which I still play regularly (it being the pride of my collection) he told me that he did not play this type of concertina (Anglo)and was a Duet player. He actually told me that he would be leaving his other instrument to his son, though I don't remember him naming you at that time. I'm delighted to see that he did! I must say the instrument looks to be in very good condition (far better than the G-D was!!!) and I would be very interested to know whether you've had it refurbished since Charlie's day. Is it in fact a duet? Or is it an Anglo? If you don't play it - though I hope you do - you can tell quite easily. Simply press one of the buttons and pull the bellows in and out. If the same note sounds on both pull and push you have a duet. If a different note sounds when you push & pull using the same button, you have an Anglo (although there are occasionally one or two buttons on a Jeffries pattern anglo which are meant to sound the same so try the middle two rows). If it does need some remedial work, I'd be very happy to do it for you and I'd love to meet you so we could have a look at each other's boxes - if you'll pardon the phrase! Are you anywhere near London? You can also contact me through my website on www.eastlondonconcertinas.co.uk Also, if your son might be interested in learning to play, we have one or two loan instruments to hand and after all, an anglo is in many ways only a (slightly more complicated) mechanical mouth organ. I'm astonished at the possible Titanic connection and it's a sobering thought that had it not been for the disaster, I might never have owned such a fabulous instrument. It's not such a huge leap from Croggan to Croughane after all so maybe the stoker is the missing link in the chain - not as I had supposed some minor music hall artist - what a great story! Get in touch if you fancy a chat over a beer or two - I'd be delighted. Ive also attached a photo (I hope) showing my G-D and my Bb-F Jeffries - Ialso have a 46Key C-G but I don't have a snap of this or my Bb-F baritone Simon Rosser
  15. Hello Ian, How nice to hear from you. When Charlie gave me the 46 key G-D Jeffries which I still play regularly (it being the pride of my collection) he told me that he did not play this type of concertina (Anglo)and was a Duet player. He actually told me that he would be leaving his other instrument to his son, though I don't remember him naming you at that time. I'm delighted to see that he did! I must say the instrument looks to be in very good condition (far better than the G-D was!!!) and I would be very interested to know whether you've had it refurbished since Charlie's day. Is it in fact a duet? Or is it an Anglo? If you don't play it - though I hope you do - you can tell quite easily. Simply press one of the buttons and pull the bellows in and out. If the same note sounds on both pull and push you have a duet. If a different note sounds when you push & pull using the same button, you have an Anglo (although there are occasionally one or two buttons on a Jeffries pattern anglo which are meant to sound the same so try the middle two rows). If it does need some remedial work, I'd be very happy to do it for you and I'd love to meet you so we could have a look at each other's boxes - if you'll pardon the phrase! Are you anywhere near London? You can also contact me through my website on www.eastlondonconcertinas.co.uk Also, if your son might be interested in learning to play, we have one or two loan instruments to hand and after all, an anglo is in many ways only a (slightly more complicated) mechanical mouth organ. I'm astonished at the possible Titanic connection and it's a sobering thought that had it not been for the disaster, I might never have owned such a fabulous instrument. It's not such a huge leap from Croggan to Croughane after all so maybe the stoker is the missing link in the chain - not as I had supposed some minor music hall artist - what a great story! Get in touch if you fancy a chat over a beer or two - I'd be delighted. Ive also attached a photo (I hope) showing my G-D and my Bb-F Jeffries - Ialso have a 46Key C-G but I don't have a snap of this or my Bb-F baritone Simon Rosser
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