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conband

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Everything posted by conband

  1. The answer to the original question is most definitely YES. So please don't try and stop our fun! Les Branchett
  2. Another variation on this theme my friend had was to see how many tunes he could play to the same bass line - even more fun if the meters were similar and all the different words sung at the same time. Les Branchett
  3. Yes, band arrangements were, and still are, mostly written on the treble stave. So think of your quartet as a small band, and then it all falls into place. As you say, baritones will sound one octave and basses two octaves lower than written, not because they are transposing, but because they are lower sounding instruments to start with. As per the strings on a piano. Les
  4. Hell SteveS. I think you are making your project harder by referring to the 4 concertinas as "transposing instruments", which clearly they are not. Think of your simple piano score - four note chord on two hands. They are just playing different notes on the same 'ladder'. You would not refer to the bass note as being transposed, it's just playing lower down - on a different rung. Similarly a bass concertina is not a transposing instrument, just on the same ladder but lower down; assuming that the four concertinas are all tuned to the same reference point,e.g. A=440, as would be the four notes on the piano). When writing the bass clef notes into the treble clef, a C still remains a C, but has a different position on the stave. When it's then played on a bass instrument, it's sounded as originally intended. Hope all goes well with your arrangement(s). Les Branchett
  5. I've been removing a reeds for over forty years, with no problems. I choose top Dsharp (push). Last note, outside row, right hand side - I found I could find it with certainty, even with my eyes closed. Additionally, if you do encounter a bat out of Hell and need it fast, there are three alternatives. Firstly, Dsharp pull (only remove one reed, as wunks says). Secondly, Eflat on the left hand side (coincidentally, fifth note again, but in the inside row) push and pull. Heed what Alex says, and make sure you don't lose it. Les Branchett
  6. Rebi: I think the final digit should be a 3, rather than 8. No real worry, it's just that I'm jealous. My first concertina was identical to yours and served me well for thirty years. Transatlantic transactions torturous at the moment, or I would be first in the queue. Regards, Les Branchett
  7. What outstanding craftsmanship. Unbelievable! Les Branchett
  8. So pleased to see this contribution - very encouraging. With apologies for not saying THANK YOU for the Homebaked series last year. So enjoyable. Les Branchett
  9. Congratulations. So enjoyable and heart warming. Just waiting for all the others now. Les Branchett
  10. Susie: Herewith come concertina restorers. All listed in the internet. MARCUS MUSIC. Newport, South Wales. Maker and restorer. Easiest to get to if you want face to face contact. Literally just off the M4. DAVID ROBERTSON. Norwich, Norfolk. Another very good craftsman, but East Anglia travel not always the best. DAVE ELLIOTT. Oughtibridge, Sheffield. Internationally known author, lecturer and renovator of concertinas. Mostly motorway. You can always post - but I always feel that insurance never covers sentimentally, where something has special meaning. Les
  11. Hello Susie. Am assembling details for posting but in the meantime, does Tovey Road mean anything to you. I so, we talked earlier this year. Les
  12. Swindon. Sorry for three part message. Les Branchett
  13. sorry, missed a bit from my last message. N S E W would help to advise a repairer in your vicinity. Incidentally, I recentlywas told of a person inheriting a similar instrument in
  14. Hello Susie. Welcome. You give no indication of your whereabouts. N,
  15. Indeed. it sounds more like a Lachenal number rather than Wheatstone. Sometimes at first glance they can look quite similar.
  16. indeed. It sounds more like a Lachenal number rather than Wheatstone. Sometimes they can look
  17. HI Mikel. Goran's contact: goranrahm@telia.com. Incidentally he was a founder member of Svenska Concertina: Phone 46(18) 557103. Or concertina@telia.com. Even more of a coincidence is that another founder member was a retired Salvation Army missionary to India. If you do take up the concertina another useful contact may be Jim Lucas (+45) 22 62 03 99. He organizes Scandanavia Squeeze-in in Sweden each year. Visually the instrument looks good, and being of good vintage and model, having it appraised before sending it off to repair may address any hidden quirks. Plenty of good restorers in England if necessary, so ask me if you need. Les
  18. Mikael.. I should be able to pick up Goran's contact tomorrow. Les
  19. Hi Mikael. Goran Rahm who lives in Sweden is their authority on all things related to concertinas. He also has good knowledge of Salvation Army usage in the past. I'm not at home at the moment so cannot give you more precise contact details, but if you have no luck finding him come back to me, as he is definitely the man you need to contact. Les Branchett
  20. Jody, don't get too excited as I am not taking your lessons because I play one of those alternative English layout models. However I found your advice both encouraging and stimulating. I'm sure brain muscle stimulated by your repetative system is the main ingredient. I say this because manual dexterity, provided there is no physical impairment, is not a limiting factor, especially if one accepts that extra high speeds on a keyboard, for instance, do not immediately or necessarily transfer to fast speeds on a concertina - I wish they did! Thanks for all your god advice, here and at gatherings. Les Branchett
  21. The following company are able to supply cotton velvet in 18 colours - in metre, half metre or fat quarter (50 x 56 cm). The smallest size would not quite complete a whole box, but I found the Wine colour was identical in every way, colour, feel, appearance, to the fabric lining the Lachenal box I was renovating, and cost just less than £5 including postage. See separate concurrent thread on glues to use, especially advice by Adrian Brown. Ralston Fabrics Unit 11 Hartley Business Park Selborne Road ALTON GU34 3HD 01420 613013 Les Branchett
  22. Unusual keys are not necessarily unusual if there is a brass band connection, as with Salvation Army. Most brass band instruments are pitched in Bflat, eg. cornets, baritones, euphonium, which means they look at a written C, but actually play a Bflat. A few instruments are. pitched in Eflat, tenor horns, and some bases. They look at a written C , and play Eflat. (Forget trombones, they're a slippery lot!) It figures therefore that if playing from written brass band arrangements, which would have been quite common, you need some concertinas sounding Bflat and some in Eflat, Les Branchett
  23. Just to say, it's useful information, as I have a label exactly like that shown on my baritone. Difficult to photograph, as being brass it wears to easily. Les Branchett
  24. Great playing, Wolf. Enjoyed it very much. Deep mid-winter was particularly appreciated. Gustaf Holst's tune "Cranham" was named after the village where he lived, in Midwinter Cottage. I can see the Cranham woods from my balcony, and often I drive through them, but your fine playing has inspired me to do something different. Next time I will take my concertina, stop in the woods, and play some of his tunes. Happy Christmas. Les Branchett
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