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gretchen

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    Toronto, Canada... but currently in Japan

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  1. Hi, So this is not about the forum exactly..... But I just attempted a search for other concertina players in the Paris (France) area (I moved here a little while ago.... anyone else here in Paris?) and came up with nothing other than a bunch of ads for sex videos and porn websites and things. I just thought I'd mention it, incase no one's done a search recently and wasn't aware of the problem. So.... there's that problem reported.
  2. Would you do this even with the C# on the second button of the top row? (I am wondering if you maybe have a set up where the first button on the top row is C# on both the push and the pull? I have seen this before)
  3. Thank you all very much for your help. I've been playing around with it a little and I find that the crossing over thing comes very easily to me as it's not *too* different from the little finger skipping movement I'd been doing. The only thing about the crossing over motion is what to do if the note is directly below the note before it... like if I were playing that run from Sean Ryan's backwards for some reason? The other suggestions are interesting too.... PeterT's second suggestion was one I'd fiddled around with, but I didn't quite like the feel of it... I'm not quite sure I understand why one is more in "English" and the other more "Irish"... is it because of the little bit of extra bounce from the bellows reversal that must follow the second option? Or does it free your hands up for some ornamentation (I must confess that at this stage of my playing I don't use so very much ornamnetation)? And Ritchie, thanks for those different methods.... I wouldn't have thought of them. Thanks again, this has been very helpful for me!
  4. My concertina has the Wheatstone fingering, so I have only one reasonable choice for this tune: B C# d on the push, with B and d in the left hand and C# in the right. If I understand you correctly, I run into the same problem in other situations though. For instance, in Em tunes B is often right after E, and I often want to play both notes with the left hand. So what I have learned to do in that situation is cross my ring finger in underneath for the B. Or if I want to play (high) e after A, top buttons of C and G rows on the left hand draw, I will drag my index finger across from A to e. Both of those are tricks I thought were nuts until I had been playing for a couple of years. I'm not so sure about that right hand draw C# though. It's on the top button of the accidental row, right? Can you reach B on the draw with your middle finger, C# with your index finger, and d with your ring finger? Actually, I tend to just play both the B and C# with my index finger... I've never actually done the crossing the fingers under each other movement. I just jump up there very quickly with the same finger.... luckily my concertina has short, rounded buttons so it's easy to slip up there. But maybe I'll run into trouble with my technique later if I don't change this now, what do you think?
  5. I've been playing for a little less than a year on an anglo concertina with a jeffries set-up. It often happens that I come across runs where two notes that are located right on top of each other must be played in very quick sucession. I'm just wondering if anyone has any little tricks for this sort of situation. I can manage to play this way but maybe there's a better way? For example in Sean Ryan's Polka (if you're not familiar with the tune here's a link: http://www.thesession.org/tunes/display/441 ) what would you do with that A part? Would you play on the pull with the B and C# on the right hand or use the push and rely more on the left hand? In this tune there's a bit of a way around it... but other times it's not so easy to find an alternative... what then? It's often the B and C# that cause this I find. Any hints?
  6. hmmm.... i guess i accidentally pressed the 'add reply' button before i was done. is there any way to delete this topic? also, just incase you clicked on this topic before the other one of the same name above, the link is: http://youtube.com/watch?v=2zAUbe_7fNA sorry for the trouble
  7. I'm not sure if anyone has ever referenced this video here before or not... but the other day I was looking around on YouTube.com for this Canadian short film that used to be on television all the time when I was growing up so I could show it to my non-Canadian husband... It's called the "Log Driver's Waltz" and it's a cute little short. Anyway, the reason I'm bringing up here is because at one point the log-driver picks up a concertina and plays it for a while as he floats downstream on a log. It's not really a big deal or anything, but it seemed to me that maybe someone here might get a wee kick out of it. Hope so! http://youtube.com/watch?v=2zAUbe_7fNA
  8. I'm not sure if anyone has ever referenced this video here before or not... but the other day I was looking around on YouTube.com for this Canadian short film that used to be on television all the time when I was growing up so I could show it to my non-Canadian husband... It's called the "Log Driver's Waltz" and it's a cute little short. Anyway, the reason I'm bringing up here is because at one point the log-driver picks up a concertina and plays it for a while as he floats downstream on a log. It's not really a big deal or anything, but it seemed to me that maybe someone here might get a wee kick out of it. Hope so!
  9. this site was invaluable to me when i first started searching around on the net for info on concertinas "just to know" of course, i didn't think i could spend the money or time that a concertina would require. anyway, thanks to this site i found out quite a lot and even bought my first concertina through a cnet member! i've recommended this site to others that i've met at sessions who are interested in maybe getting a concertina someday. thanks so much everyone!
  10. Thank you all so much! Hopefully it'll stick this time, eh? Anyway, I really do appreciate the help.
  11. He didn't start the thread. And for the record, I find his posts as easy to read as most others... I don't understand why some posters have felt the need to take a condescending tone about his posting/language ability. I think it's rude, whether they agree with his points or not. Edited to add: I myself don't mean to come off harsh. I have enjoyed following this thread for the most part, but I just feel like people might sit back and take a deep breath before they respond or something. I think it's easy for anyone to forget to do this, hence this edit. Anyway, it's probably harder to get your point across to another if you've got your back up.
  12. I haven't been playing Irish music or the concertina for more than a few months, but there's something that I've been having a bit of trouble fully grasping... how to tell *by listening* what is a jig, what is a reel, what is a slip-jig, horpipe, etc. I've had people explain this to me in the past, but by the time I get back home I've always forgotten their explanations, no matter how clear they were to me before. I feel sort of silly for asking about this, maybe I could figure it out on my own, but I'm hoping seeing it in writing will help. Is this maybe just one of those things that takes a while? I mean, I can kinda tell polkas from reels, but I'd never be sure enough bet on it or anything. When I learn a song I tend to play it over and over with a tape, if I have it on tape, so that I can get the rhythm that way. Is there anywhere that I can look to figure these things out better? Thanks in advance for any help with this!
  13. This isn't necessarily to disagree with you Mark, just to add that I lived with a family in the connamara gaeltacht this past summer and in visiting the church in my town to hear the mass (in Irish), I was very surprised by the style of singing for the hymns... they seemed to be a sort of mix of regular hymn-type singing and sean-nos style singing (in terms of the tone and ornamentation, it wasn't that the songs were unaccompanied or anything)... and the people singing seemed very enthusiastic... one old gentleman in particular. Anyway, I'm not a religious type myself, so I really have no basis for comparison for this in other churches (I went to church in Ireland mainly to learn to vocabulary and practice my listening skills) but there certainly seemed to be a tradition of signing in church there... but again, it was quite different from the singing that went on in the pubs.
  14. You could try Google, looking for desiccant. <{POST_SNAPBACK}> Hey thanks... and I learned a new word!
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