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Woodsman

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    I play English concertina and accordion. Currently play with Celtic Slow Jam plus a world music group. Intermediate player.
  • Location
    Ottawa Canada

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  1. Hi Greg, Happy 2016 from Canada, to you and your family. I'm curious about the big one mentioned above ("huge metal-ended McCann"). You mentioned one that had 81 keys. This appears to have 62? All the best, Keith
  2. Thanks for all your helpful comments. The diagnoses & solutions are mostly as I suspected. Metal fatigue was my assumption, once it continued to go flat. Neither the old nor the replacement (which is in all probability also an old reed) have any extra metal soldered on. The replacement is stamped with G. I can't recall whether the other one did--I sent it back when I got the replacement. This G is probably the most used note, as I'm playing lots of Celtic stuff, mostly in key of G or D. I have looked carefully and can't see signs of cracks etc. Greg Jowaisas is sending me both a brass and a steel reed to replace this one. He has been extremely helpful. With his (on line) guidance I filed the old reed several times, just so I could continue to use it. But the time it would stay in tune got shorter and shorter--down to 1/2 hour. It's great having all this expertise accessible through concertina.net
  3. Possibly this has been raised before, but I didn't find it on a quick survey. I bought an approx. 1895 48 button Lachenal EC last September. It has brass reeds. In general, I'm very happy with the feel and sound of the instrument, given that I can't justify paying thousands for something more upscale. I've been gradually wrapping my head around the EC fingering (I play accordion). After about a month, one reed, the G2 (low G on the left side) went flat. Consulting with the seller, I filed it to tune, but soon it went flat again. After a few tries it would only hold the tuning for less than an hour. So the seller supplied me with a replacement reed. I got that in January--all great. It played fine until last week. Now the same reed is going flat again. Again I tuned it, but it's not holding. Why does it go flat, and why this one reed out of 96? What is the solution?
  4. Just a note to confirm that I am happy with my Lachenal concertina, purchased from you, Greg; and particularly for all the extra efforts you made to make sure everything functions as it should, from the pre-purchase information, to the shipping, and the follow-up. (Feel free to use this as a testimonial.) I am enjoying the challenge of learning the EC fingering--it feels like I am 6 years old again (instead of 73) and starting piano lessons. The fingers are grudgingly and with many goof-ups, yielding to the new patterns. I love the sound of the instrument, and can sense that it has good potential for sweet music, once I get the hang of it. All the best, Keith
  5. Hi everyone, I just wanted to say that I have purchased and received a Lachenal treble EC from Greg Jowaisas. Greg has gone over the top with helpful advice, service and flexibility. I am still getting used to my first EC, haven't fully decided how well it will work for me but I will definitely give it some time and effort. One person suggested a duet; I might consider that in future but actually I look forward to the challenge of the different fingering system--a brain stimulus project for me. It's a beautiful little instrument. Thanks to all who offered advice. Keith
  6. Hi Stephen,

    Actually I have just purchased a similar instrument from Greg Jowaisas. It's being shipped now, hopefully I'll have it before the weekend.

  7. Hi I noticed your post, I have a fully resotred brass reeded Lachenal EC very mellow sound that I would consider placing for US 750. I would love to keep it but I have too 3 other concertinas and do not have time to play this one as it should be played. My email is stephenknoll@yahoo.com

  8. Hi, I'm new to this discussion board (it's great!) and I haven't yet played on a concertina. I have been playing accordion for more years than I care to admit. As another person mentioned, I can imagine playing the push-pull (but I can't really do it). But I have seen players who switch back and forth--the brain process for that is something I can't fathom. About a month ago I went to a performance of Finest Kind, a group from my hometown (http://www.finestkind.ca/index.htm); Ian Robb was playing English Concertina, which I knew nothing about. I thought all concertinas were push-pull but I could see he was playing the same note in and out. So I have decided (in my 70s) to "master" the English Concertina (joke). A question about this topic of fingering choices--I believe different English Concertinas have different button arrangements. For example, will there be serious differences in button layout, say, between a Lachenal 48 button and a Stagi 48 button, etc?
  9. A usual (and complete) "treble" EC (with the pitch range of a violin) has got 48 buttons, whereas a count of 56 buttons will normally indicate - either a "tenor-treble" ("TT") with some added lower reeds, which I would really appreciate to own and play, - or an "expanded treble", which is not so useful, as the added higher reeds fit dogs and bats better than humans. Wow, all these great responses! But if I were considering a 56 button (say, on-line), how would I know if the added buttons were in the lower or higher range?
  10. Hi, I'm looking to buy my first English Concertina. I don't want to go too upscale at this stage--maybe up to around $500 (could be more if the right thing came along). I am aware of the Jackie/Jacks and Stagi models. I note that for the 30 button Stagi, it says some accidentals are omitted, whereas the Jackie is fully chromatic(?) I'm wondering about 48 or a 56 button but I don't know how difficult the fingering will be (also the cost factor). I have been playing accordion for quite a few years (not overly well). I'm hoping to get something that doesn't have too strident a tone--if I want volume my accordion can do that. Any advice offered will be welcome--especially news of a good concertina for me at a good price. I live in Ottawa Canada. I'm in my 70s and looking for a new musical challenge. I'm happy to have found concertina.net.
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