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  1. Today
  2. Wolf Molkentin

    Introducing Alex Holden's #3: A Crane!

    Rüdiger, you might provide a somewhat slower tune with more sustain then, I would love to hear how the temperament would sweeten the sound...
  3. alex_holden

    Introducing Alex Holden's #3: A Crane!

    Thanks RAc! One point to mention, Holden #3 is tuned in 1/5th comma meantone and I think the Wheatstone is in ET.
  4. vi.anderson43

    mint condition Rochelle + 2 instruction books

    Is this instrument still available? Are you local to Fort Worth, Texas? Vi Anderson
  5. saguaro_squeezer

    larger Cranes - variants and techniques

    I forgot to add this to the previous post and I'm sorry. Josh's diagram for the 80 key had the C# in the 4th column, which, to me, is inside that 3-finger ascending pattern. Since there are no accidentals in that pattern, it makes more sense to me to put the c# in one of the "accidental" (outside) columns (1 or 5).
  6. saguaro_squeezer

    larger Cranes - variants and techniques

    True, perhaps, but I already have a practical Maccann and I've always wanted that impractical Crane. How does that song go" "Call me, irresponsible ..."
  7. Greetings! I’m looking for a professional concertina tuner in the PNW area. Searching online I found http://www.bellandreed.com/content/accordions/accordions.php in Seattle but not much else. Any recommendations or ideas? I would consider other areas in the western USA, but I’d prefer not to ship too far. Thanks! Scott
  8. Little John

    larger Cranes - variants and techniques

    Looking at it again, what I was suggesting is the lowest of the proposals in your spreadsheet. Unless I'm mistaken, Bb2 is there (in the guise of A#2) and you could replace the G#2 for the more useful F#2 (or, logically, Gb2 as its position would suggest). There isn't really any such concept as a "proper" place for accidentals. Even on the smallest Crane you have D#4 but Eb5 on the right hand side; yet each is likely serve the other purpose at times (i.e. Eb4 and D#5 respectively). Most of all, though, I note Geoff Crabb's comment on the thread to which you give the link: "The 80 button Crabb 'Crane' instrument can be considered as impractical due to the physical length of the keyboards. There existence, as usual, was due to customer requests and few were made. The more practical McCann/Wheatstone 81 was the choice of most." It makes me wonder at the value of the whole exercise of converting a practical Maccann to an impractical Crane.
  9. Yesterday
  10. Wolf Molkentin

    Introducing Alex Holden's #3: A Crane!

    the sound is amazingly different, judging from the recording
  11. Everyone interested will find a comparative video between my 55 button Wheatstone and Alex's #3 here: Youtube link Since Youtube compresses videos during upload, the audio quality may not be too useful. I have a raw .wav file of the recording. Please contact me via PM if you are interested in the file. It is already evident that Alex's bellows are amazingly efficient. I attach a picture of my 8 fold 55 button Wheatstone and Alex's #3 (7 folds) fully extended and left to relax. As you can see in the video, I rarely need to work Alex's concertina nearly as much as the Wheatstone's.
  12. Wolf Molkentin

    bellows vs button

    if it sounds better it is better - I‘m always advocating for meaningful direction changes... however, would you care to provide some details? best wishes - 🐺
  13. Is it doctrinal for the English concertina to use buttons for successive notes on same line or is bellows movement acceptable? The latter often sounds better to me.
  14. Exactly what John said. Just about any concertina can be a singers concertina if it is played in a manner to suit the song and the voice. My E-concer is loud and bright, it's taught me to play quietly when required. Can I suggest the EC and Duet have an edge in offering the full range of keys which can be useful for finding a key to suit ones voice for a particular song. But of course the Anglo in the hands of a proficient player can handle a good range of keys, enough for most singers to be able to adjust to. With my limited ability on the Anglo I'm stuck in C for songs. The Anglo, I think, is actually better for some types of songs, bouncy songs, than the other systems. But forty something years ago I was advised the EC was the one for singing. I've never regretted heading that advice.
  15. Exactly what Wolf said. But if you are a singer looking for a concertina, it doesn't mean you have to look for one that lacks all volume and brightness. The first criterion is a pleasant tone - however you define that. Most accompaniments are interspersed with intros, outros, bridges and instrumental breaks, so the accompanying instrument - in this case, the concertina - must be able to hold its own in the area of audibility and expressiveness. And while you're singing the verses, a good concertina can be played quietly. If you have a good voice, the concertina should be good enough to match it. And if you haven't got a good voice, at least the concertina should have, so that there'll be at least something worth hearing! Cheers, John
  16. saguaro_squeezer

    larger Cranes - variants and techniques

    Little John, The only issue that I had until a few minutes ago was that you don't have a place to put either the F#2 or Bb2. I found this thread from back in 2011 where someone asked a similar question and we also got the benefit of Geoff Crabb's input on how the 'plus-size' keyboards were more individual (I think that the 69 key layout that Josh refers to in his post is my previous one) .... So, the 80 key layout in Josh's thread might be good, if you pull the C#2 out to below the F#2 in the rightmost column, just to keep the accidentals in their proper columns!
  17. Very nice small Louis Lachenal concertina circa 1865. Plays well and sounds excellent. Has been carefully restored and tuned. Comes with Wheatstone case. £695 plus postage. Uk only.
  18. Geoff Wooff

    Wheatstone materials question

    Usually Bone.
  19. Don Taylor

    Name of this tune from the Hebrides?

    Yes, that sounds right to me, or maybe "Variations on a Theme of ..." Don.
  20. Sprunghub

    Call and response

    Yes David, that is along the lines of what I think I am looking for. I see it mentioned in some peoples conversations about their playing and I 'thought' I understood what they were getting at, but wasn't entirely sure. . I start off by finding the melody (by ear ) on the right hand, then - to some extent - forced ( or am forcing myself ) to work more with the left hand to play partial chords and octave notes ( even the right one/s occasionally !) with the melody. I am getting there, but it is a bit too "full" sometimes. I am better at copying then adapting to suit than trying to understand some of the theory, so many thanks.
  21. Wolf Molkentin

    larger Cranes - variants and techniques

    not sure as yet - however the second pattern would at least easily allow for the missing highest Bb added on top of the leftmost row, wouldn’t it?
  22. Little John

    larger Cranes - variants and techniques

    Why not just cary the natural sequence downward, ending with C2 alone in the middle column (beneath F2)? LJ
  23. alex_holden

    Wheatstone materials question

    You may find this article helpful: http://www.antiquegamblingchips.com/distinguish_iv_bon_cel.htm
  24. I didn't know whether to put this in the Construction forum or the History forum, so I'll just put it here instead. I've got a Wheatstone Aeola Maccann duet made in 1914. It's got a little white bit at the end of each handrest where the strap attaches. Are these ivory, or just bone? Or something else? Grateful for any info.
  25. saguaro_squeezer

    larger Cranes - variants and techniques

    I ran into an interesting issue this morning. I'd sent a proposed layout to Alex for the upcoming MacCrane and used the Crabb 80-key layout that Geoff had provided as a starting point. I left the F and Bb outliers on the LH because I've gotten used to them on my current Crabb 57. Alex said that he thought it a bit odd and so I tried to come up with the sequence to eliminate them and stay within the 5 column format. It seems that it can be done if you start the LH on C2 and move upwards in the usual Crane fashion. But for the 80b, it appears that Crabb added rows to the standard 6 row layout of the 55b, trying to keep them intact. And therin is the rub, there's no nice way to add those rows without pulling one or more notes out of the Chevron. Any thoughts? ProposedLayoutChange.xlsx
  26. John Wild

    Name of this tune from the Hebrides?

    It is similar in parts to this song but overall I think it is not the same tune, perhaps from a common origin?
  27. Yah. These are both Jeff duets which have lots of variation outside the core rows to begin with and both have significant differences between them. The objective is to: -bring them into fingering compliance with each other (as far as possible, one is 6.25" and the other 8.5" and so will have a greater low end range ). -bring them both into compliance with a "standard version" of the pattern ( in case by some slim chance I happen across another box). -Add a small number of notes to the low range of each, mainly with a cluster of thumb keys (freeing up the fingers for other use. I use my strap over the wrist on the left hand and will eliminate the palm rest). I'm exploring the possibilities and will have a complete plan before discussing this with a maker.
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