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  2. Mandozip

    C/G Edgley for Sale

    Still available?
  3. kirstieevans@hotmail.com

    48 button Wheatstone Crane for sale (uk)

    I have a Crabb 67 Crane Duet, no. 18238, for sale. Nigel Sture just serviced it replacing valves and tuned reeds. Have had it for 10 years and have full history of its life. Finally decided my fingers can't quite stretch far enough
  4. Today
  5. mike_s

    Fingers slipping

    Interesting thread. I guess I must have different skin, technique or something. I am fairly new to the instrument (Anglo), but find the delrin buttons to be just fine. Not slippery to me. So, I guess I am a dissenter. 🙄
  6. Wolf Molkentin

    Fiddlin' around with the concertina.

    yes - shoes of brass, aluminium... attached to the wood, mostly by pushing them into their respective slots
  7. Wolf Molkentin

    Fiddlin' around with the concertina.

    wunks, no one will query whether „harmonics are playing a role in tone quality“. besides, a traditional concertina as discussed in these forums will have no reed blocks.
  8. Little John. Thanx for that observation. I expected as much but I didn't recall a wooden brace plate when I had the Wheatstone apart years ago. It's been an interesting side conversation but I'm going to pause my experimental efforts for now. I just don't have the time at the moment. I'm enjoying the topic though and there does seem to be some support for the idea of harmonics playing a role in tone quality and "unifying" the instrument somehow. I'll try the sound post idea at a later date unless someone beats me to it and of course other schemes have popped into my head. How 'bout a wire connecting the reed blocks at their bases? how 'bout rounding the reed tips? I seem to recall from reading about aluminum boat fabrication that sharp corners and edges create nodes of vibratory " dissonance" resulting in premature failure of parts. There's a reference to "fishtail reeds" in Don's resonator thread. Comments?
  9. bazza

    Old postcard

    One of my collection
  10. Hi wunks. If your instruments have metal ends, the tiny screws or rivets within the button pattern will be to hold the wooden bushing board in place. The metal is too thin to attach felt bushes, so a wooden board is needed. Wooden ended instruments don't need this - they are thick enough on their own. If you can see other screws, the heads of which do not come through the end plates, they will most likely be to prevent too much flexing of the end plate. I've seen that on at least one instrument. LJ
  11. I got my instruments out this morning with the intent of experimenting with a sound post. Both of them however have connections from the end plate to (perhaps) the action board other than for the strap ends. The Jeffries has two small screws spaced in the button pattern. I'm seeing 5! tiny rivet ends in the button pattern of the Wheatstone (larger instrument around 8.5 inches). The fret work of both is too tight to insert a sound post or determine, even with a pen light, what they're connected to; post or brace. I don't want to go further and open them up. I yield the floor.
  12. Yesterday
  13. Little John

    48 button Wheatstone Crane for sale (uk)

    Thanks for introducing me to Heartstrings and Caitlin nic Gabhans. It's a lovely tune which I might have a go at myself. Do you have many tunes that go this low? I have a handful or more that go to the B just below middle C, but I can't think of any tune that goes lower. LJ
  14. Mine hurt for the first few weeks when I started playing, then at some point I didn't notice that this had stopped. I'm not sure if I started playing lighter, or whether I had killed the nerves in my fingertips, but this never happened again, even when I have returned after not having played for a few years. In fact, when I started playing again a few months ago, a lot of the pains I thought I'd have--fingertips, my strapped thumbs, etc, never happened. Some of it might be because along the way as I got more familiar with it, I learned to relax?
  15. Wolf Molkentin

    Did Brian Hayden ever record anything on his duet?

    nice video - will watch it in its entirety later on - but re Brian Hayden, he‘s (you‘re) playing a double-reeded instrument (rather sounding like a Carlsfelder to me), isn‘t he (aren‘t you)? best wishes - 🐺
  16. I played a Minstrel for several months before upgrading to a Clover. The Minstrel’s buttons are fairly small diameter and my finger tips got slightly tender during long practice sessions at the Noel Hill school earlier this month. I picked up my Clover shortly after returning from the week at Tilimuk. The Clover’s buttons are metal sleeved and somewhat larger diameter. They are noticeably more comfortable than the Minstrel’s. I’m also trying to pay attention to my playing technique and use no more force than necessary to depress the buttons.
  17. Jim Besser

    Tangling With The Tango On The Anglo

    This is a few years old. English concertina, D/G melodeon and C/G Anglo baritone.
  18. mdarnton

    Tangling With The Tango On The Anglo

    A+. Thanks for sharing!
  19. Here is the man himself, all of 5 seconds of him playing, at 9.09 in a video of Bracknell folk festival from 1988:
  20. In a couple of recent threads, flat vs round topped buttons were mentioned and it prompted me to ask the question - am I the only one whose finger tips get tender from playing my concertina? My main instrument is a 56 key tenor treble Edeophone whose buttons are rounded and relatively small. Admittedly it's possible I'm hammering my buttons, but I wondered if tenderness was common to small round topped buttons.
  21. soloduetconcertina

    Tangling With The Tango On The Anglo

    I've just uploaded a video of Tango Caliente on the Hayden duet: Please let me know if somebody have recorded this tune on the anglo or other systems. And thanks again for sharing the score!
  22. James McBee

    Fingers slipping

    I had a concertina with Delrin buttons, and I found them to be too slick for my taste. I have essential tremor, and materials with a bit more purchase work better for me. Thankfully, when I ordered my Kensington from Dana Johnson--who usually uses Delrin--he was able to accommodate me by making some bone ones. (Thanks again Dana!) The bone had a lot of grip at first, but has been polished by my fingers over time. It is still nowhere near as slippery as Delrin, and provides a happy medium between purchase and speed. I had the same thought as you when I was playing my old instrument, and wondered whether I was blaming the material for my own faults. But I would echo what others have said. If another material suits you better, there is nothing wrong with that. For a lot of people Delrin is probably ideal. That doesn't mean it is ideal for you.
  23. Noel Ways

    Andy Western

    Andy Western has uploaded several recordings in the last few days to SoundCloud that c.net folks might be interested in. Here is the most recent. There are several others over the last few days worth checking out: Nicely done, Andy!!
  24. Last week
  25. mdarnton

    Fingers slipping

    There's not reason to blame the carpenter if he isn't equally happy with small brass keys, wide glass ones, round tops, flat ones, slippery ones, gripping ones. If it were mine, and I perceived that to be a problem, I'd probably lightly dust the key tops with a green kitchen pad to break the glaze. This should give just a bit more traction without being problematic. Not hard enough to depress the keys, nor to pull them sideways--just lightly across all the tops at once for a few large, light passes. If it doesn't work, stop!
  26. Mjolnir

    Fingers slipping

    Eh, everyone has different preferences. A left handed carpenter would be perfectly justified in blaming a tool made for right handed people. I haven't personally had issues with delrin, but I prefer larger buttons with domed tops, while other people prefer small buttons with flat tops. You could probably get used to delrin with practice, just as I could probably get used to narrow buttons. But if there are other options out there, like brass buttons that are more sticky, there's no harm in trying them and seeing if they feel better.
  27. Could start another "discussion" but it's the same instrument and refers more to the type of music and /or context in which it's played. The only modifications I'm aware of are a flattening of the top of the bridge by some to make better use of open string drones, triple stops and chords. Also different tunings of the strings, often in conjunction with the former. Fiddlers often dispense with a shoulder rest and/or hold it against the chest. They usually hold the bow differently releasing the pinky from the frog end of the bow and sometimes choking up on it. Beginners are sometimes taught to play with the bowing arm elbow resting on a table to establish a desired wristy technique. There are gourd and cigar box fiddles but they might just as well be called gourd and cigar box violins. Give me a Stradovarious, or any fine concert violin and I'll be happy as a clam sawin' out "Fop Eared Mule"!
  28. Mandozip

    Herrington 24 key "Edgley Special"

    Ad me to the intrested que . Email sent
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