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  2. Wolf Molkentin

    my first Anglo recording :)

    😉 Thank you so much Mike, the encouragement from your side means a lot to me here - I take it from you that I‘m on my way...
  3. Possibly so, but this might lead us back to the topic - better/longer-lasting reliability of a newly-made instrument? sound quality? specific issues of „top-modern“ makes, depending on availability of materials? I’m aware of concerns and musing of some fellow concertinists... So what would you say, Alex?
  4. Mikefule

    my first Anglo recording :)

    Lovely playing. Those are two of the simpler Morris tunes and are often overlooked, but you extract every last nuance out of them. Good work, and all that delicacy of touch on a humble 20b too — we are not worthy, oh great one!
  5. Today
  6. Thanks Wolf! Indeed, I'd be willing to quote to build an English. One problem (or so I am told) is that there is no shortage of good vintage 48 button treble Englishes at prices lower than I would have to charge to build a new one. I did get an inquiry about a bass English, but I don't think that one is going to happen.
  7. Steve Dickinson still makes English concertinas under the Wheatstone name. See http://www.wheatstone.co.uk/wheatstone/ I imagine his waiting times are long too. Steve
  8. @alex_holden might be willing to make one (and he is a craftsman extraordinaire), don't know how long his waiting list would be...
  9. felix castro

    Questions for bandoneon

    As I am also interested in the 144 bandoneon, and I have contacted with Mr. Omar Caccia, the writer of the 144 bandoneon blogspot, I can tell some things. As Mr. Omar Caccia tells the 144 bandoneon was invented in 1924. Since then and as the bandonions intended to copy the sound of the accordion, they developed bandonions with two, three, even four sets of reeds, usually in the right hand. There are 144 bandonions i.e. with two sets of reeds in octave (low and medium, LM) in the left hand and in the right hand with two sets of reeds but not L M, they are with Medium Medium reeds (MM), with tremolo, giving a more accordion sound. As Mr. Omar tells 144 bandonions with L M in left and right are rare, and with zinc plates, even rarer. If the bandonion is with three sets and it is with LMM, it can work "setting off" one of the M reeds set. But if it is only with two sets, M M, it isn't possible to do. I have one 144 bandoneon gebruder meinel with LM in the left (I think) and MM in the right. I bought recently a alfred arnold with three sets of reeds, LMM, and I shall set off one of the M sets searching a more typical bandonion sound. Also the zinc plates have different sound than the aluminium plates.
  10. In another post you say that you have decided to stick with the EC. AFAICT there is only one modern maker of ECs - Wim Wakker. They are not cheap and the waiting list is long. http://www.wakker-concertinas.com/english pricelist.htm Steve, a member here, has a Parnassus.
  11. Many thanks for the varied replies. After considerable thought for the time being I will stay with the EC.
  12. Don Taylor

    Repair/Check up/tuning new Stagi A18

    A Stagi button staying down is usually caused by an internal action rubber sleeve having deteriorated with age. It is a common problem with most Stagi type actions (which includes a lot of Chinese boxes) that has been discussd here before. The easy fix involves replacing the rubber sleeve with something else, a bit of tubing or even a bit of a plastic straw has been used. The hardest part is getting all of the buttons to go back through their holes when you try to put the end back on. I know that your concertina is new from Brunner and that these sleeves should be good for a few years, but I wonder how new your concertina really is. Maybe it has been on a warehouse shelf for a few years. Anyway, if you are at all mechanically inclined then you could look back in these forums and decide if this is something you can attempt to fix yourself. (I will try to add some links later today). Good luck, Don.
  13. Personally I have no idea. But I would imagine modern makers have the advantage of examining the older models and are in a position to make improvements. What is the view of those who have used both?
  14. Toonladder

    Repair/Check up/tuning new Stagi A18

    Thank you for your help. I will certainly keep him in mind in case there is not someone closer to Ghent.
  15. Wolf Molkentin

    consecutive notes

    I guess I would involve another note at one point - will have to try out which (possibly G) and where this evening...
  16. Kenglish

    consecutive notes

    In a jig on the English moving across to the lower F# on the right, for example, the two-finger roll technique to play a triplet (three consecutive notes on the same button) implies using fingers 1 & 2 all the time, yet this requires one to travel quite some way across the finger board. I've given a sample. It's a decoration, of course, but one that I wish to conquer. When attempting this with fingers 2 & 3 it feels much weaker and slower. There are, in fact, four F# notes to negotiate in this, so there is the problem of how to ensure that one's fingers fall on the buttons in the correct order. Looking forward to suggestions as to how to overcome this difficulty.
  17. Wolf Molkentin

    Repair/Check up/tuning new Stagi A18

    Harry Geuns springs to my mind (albeit aprox. 160 km from Ghent). Best wishes - 🐺
  18. I am looking for someone near Ghent, Belgium (or the Netherlands) who can check up and adjust my new Stagi A18. It comes straight from the builder Brunner in Italy. At least one of the buttons does not come back after pushing. Thank you for your suggestions.
  19. Wolf Molkentin

    Highs and Lows of concertina playing

    I guess you have it right, however I haven't been able to verify that within 20 seconds, there's at least a lot of - partly serious - musing to go through.. The impact will hardly affect the pitch, but possibly the response; although this will not be that much of an issue with free reeds... (different with woodwinds apparently).
  20. Wolf Molkentin

    my first Anglo recording :)

    Thanks a lot, glad that you like my take - it was your Crabb that really got me started (re Anglo)... Best wishes - 🐺
  21. Toonladder

    Purchasing A New Stagi Hayden In Europe

    Finally after 12 weeks (instead of the promised 4 or less) I received my Stagi from Brunner Musica Recanati Italy. Very poor communication from Brunner during this time and also promisses of delivery that turned out to be fake. I even asked my money back; no response. And yes, the instrument needs to be checked; at least one button does not work properly and does not come back after pushing it. A lot of annoyance ☹️.
  22. Wolf Molkentin

    Do many players play more than one system?

    So it's you who bought the huge instrument from Theo? I had been musing about the measurements before deciding to go for the Crane... (out of curiosity: would you care to give me the size across the flats?). Congrats in any event! Best wishes - 🐺
  23. I've played Anglo basically forever (for 35 or 40 years) and I've played Crane for about eight years. I use Crane mainly for solo playing and Anglo mainly for playing with other musicians. I'm glad that I play both. I play piano accordion too (less often). I don't have any real trouble switching back and forth, though I find it helpful to have a couple of minutes to warm up on each instrument if I play one right after another. I also played Hayden before I took up Crane and I experimented with Chemnitzer for a while, but I don't actively play either of those now. Two concertina systems and one accordion seems about right for me.
  24. saguaro_squeezer

    Do many players play more than one system?

    I started my concertina journey with EC but switched to Crane after a few months. I've never regretted that move, except that i struggle with both hands at the same time. I recently started on Anglo and (after much poking at Dirge before I knew better ...) Maccann. It's probably just to see if I can learn multiple systems ... but it's easier now than when I started on EC and wanted to switch to Crane. My Crabb Maccann is going to be a challenge, but how wonderful to have all those notes to use!
  25. Chris Ghent

    Highs and Lows of concertina playing

    It is a myth, 20 seconds of googling will turn up good scientific sources declaring altitude makes no difference to pitch.
  26. Yesterday
  27. Wolf Molkentin

    Anglo in F

    it‘s in Gmix/Gdor, so not playable on a 20b I reckon... (you would need a Bb in the B section, no prob with more buttons), whereas harmonies include Fmaj and Dmin as for me, so transpose from here and see which „chords“ are available, or welcome different harmonies when shifting the melody...
  28. Wolf Molkentin

    Do many players play more than one system?

    This had been my understanding I think. And as you say, for a listener I would agree; but I wouldn’t expect the player to make the switch as easily as between tunings (Joni Mitchell springs to mind), as the coordination of finger and hand action is so different regarding the Anglo, English and Duet concertina... (so even the ordinary guitarist might learn the different tabs, whereas switching between the concertina systems is perfectly manageable, just like learning to play guitar and banjo, or concertina and melodeon, all „new“ instruments).
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