Jump to content


Photo

Mark Gilston on YouTube


  • Please log in to reply
48 replies to this topic

#19 JimLucas

JimLucas

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denmark

Posted 04 October 2009 - 04:45 AM

Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson.

Hmm. A printed version perhaps?

That would mean I'd have to figure out what notes I'm playing! :-) But in all seriousness, I play everything by ear.

You mean you are a "By-Ear" player of English system, whose playing sounds like he's working with a score? I just can't cope with this. I refuse!

Misha, what do you think of the playing of Danny Chapman (ratface)? I'm pretty sure that although he can read and write music notation, he does his composing and arranging and much of his tune learning by ear. (And I'm quite sure that if I'm wrong, he'll let us know.)

Now that I think of it, Misha, how do you do your own arranging? Do you actually write it all out on paper before hearing how any of it sounds on an instrument? That's something that I would find very strange.

#20 JimLucas

JimLucas

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denmark

Posted 04 October 2009 - 04:48 AM

Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson.

Hmm. A printed version perhaps? As a gesture to promote Swedish music among endless Russian steppes?

Hey Misha, are you going to use this tune for steppe dancing? How about some videos? :D

#21 Samantha

Samantha

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 725 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South West Scotland

Posted 04 October 2009 - 06:00 AM

Lovely playing Mark! thanks for posting these links.

#22 Tradman

Tradman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cedar Park, Texas

Posted 09 October 2009 - 08:34 PM

Another Swedish tune this week. This time it's a gånglåt or walking tune. This one is on my CD "Lend Me an Ear".

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=7LHvoqr2xnk

Enjoy,
Mark Gilston

Edited by Tradman, 31 October 2009 - 08:53 AM.


#23 Tradman

Tradman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cedar Park, Texas

Posted 16 October 2009 - 04:22 PM

Today I posted a video of me playing the jig, Coleraine.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=y-zmhrKGagQ

Hope you all enjoy!

Mark Gilston

#24 m3838

m3838

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2629 posts

Posted 17 October 2009 - 12:26 AM

Back to Swedish music this week with a lovely Waltz-Skänklåt after Erik Nillson.

Hmm. A printed version perhaps? As a gesture to promote Swedish music among endless Russian steppes?

Hey Misha, are you going to use this tune for steppe dancing? How about some videos? :D


Dancing in the Steppes? You probably think of Khazars.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Khazar_1.gif
Anyway, I was making skewered potatoes, and while pealing them, cut off very tip of my finger. Surprisingly I was able to stop the bleeding quite quickly and am able to type. But my playing is stopped cold turkey for now.
Before that I was learning some kids' stuff : Polonaise and Menuet from "Bach Easy Violin Duets". I don't make my arrangements. It's more like I simplify the written music.

#25 Tradman

Tradman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cedar Park, Texas

Posted 30 October 2009 - 07:32 PM

Last week no video because I was concertizing in Ohio. This week I'm back with another Swedish walking tune. This is the well-known gånglåt "Gärdeby" once again played on an English baritone.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=Wq2KBrXprZ4

Enjoy,
Mark Gilston

#26 Larry Stout

Larry Stout

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 589 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Normal, IL

Posted 30 October 2009 - 08:33 PM

That's lovely. I've played the tune on fiddle, I'll have to try it on concertina. I'm prety sure it won't sound as good as yours did!

Edited by Larry Stout, 30 October 2009 - 08:38 PM.


#27 SteveS

SteveS

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1235 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:High Wycombe, UK

Posted 31 October 2009 - 05:08 AM

gänglåt


gånglåt


gänglåt is something quite different.

#28 JimLucas

JimLucas

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denmark

Posted 31 October 2009 - 09:02 AM

gänglåt

gånglåt

gänglåt is something quite different.

A modern Irish session, perhaps? ;) :o



#29 Tradman

Tradman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cedar Park, Texas

Posted 07 November 2009 - 01:50 PM

Today's contribution is English! It is my version of Bold Princess Royal which I learned about 35 years ago before I knew anything about Morris dancing. No capers, but I hope you like it anyway.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=V9O7H1wmFb0

Mark Gilston

#30 Larry Stout

Larry Stout

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 589 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Normal, IL

Posted 07 November 2009 - 02:45 PM

I like it.

#31 Hereward

Hereward

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 524 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Middlesex

Posted 07 November 2009 - 02:57 PM

I like it.


Me too.

Ian

#32 JimLucas

JimLucas

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denmark

Posted 07 November 2009 - 03:15 PM

Today's contribution is English! It is my version of Bold Princess Royal which I learned about 35 years ago before I knew anything about Morris dancing. No capers, but I hope you like it anyway.
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=V9O7H1wmFb0

Nicely done, Mark.

Actually, the tune's composition is credited to Turlough O'Carolan, which would make it originally Irish, and a concert piece. The tune was adopted and adapted by the English for Morris dancing. There are numerous versions in various Cotswold Morris traditions, some minor (like the original), others major or in other modes. The slow sections for capers were a modification specifically for the Morris, and I suppose not everyone would consider that a great leap upward. :D

I think it's a great tune in all it's many versions. Another great performance (IMO), this one on the anglo (and with the "slows" for Morris), is by John Roberts on the John & Tony CD A Present from the Gentlemen.

#33 Tradman

Tradman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cedar Park, Texas

Posted 07 November 2009 - 03:22 PM

Today's contribution is English! It is my version of Bold Princess Royal which I learned about 35 years ago before I knew anything about Morris dancing. No capers, but I hope you like it anyway.
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=V9O7H1wmFb0

Nicely done, Mark.

Actually, the tune's composition is credited to Turlough O'Carolan, which would make it originally Irish, and a concert piece. The tune was adopted and adapted by the English for Morris dancing. There are numerous versions in various Cotswold Morris traditions, some minor (like the original), others major or in other modes. The slow sections for capers were a modification specifically for the Morris, and I suppose not everyone would consider that a great leap upward. :D

I think it's a great tune in all it's many versions. Another great performance (IMO), this one on the anglo (and with the "slows" for Morris), is by John Roberts on the John & Tony CD A Present from the Gentlemen.


Thanks for the info, Jim. I had no idea that it was credited to O'Carolan. He seems to show up all over the British isles. John will be coming to Palestine (TX) for the Old Time and Dulcimer (and concertina) fest this march, and I had been thinking it might be interesting for the participants to have us play our versions side by side.

#34 JimLucas

JimLucas

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denmark

Posted 07 November 2009 - 04:58 PM

I had no idea that it was credited to O'Carolan.

No. 641 in O'Neill's 1850 Irish Melodies, in the section titled "O'Carolan's Compositions". :)



#35 Tradman

Tradman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cedar Park, Texas

Posted 14 November 2009 - 01:00 PM

This week's posting is a Norwegian springleik (the same one as on English International, though I play it a bit differently these days).

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=LfRDgpAXjKY

Hope you enjoy,
http://markgilston.com/

#36 Tradman

Tradman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cedar Park, Texas

Posted 20 November 2009 - 02:55 PM

This week I've uploaded Galway Bay, my favorite Irish hornpipe. It's very different style from my usual rich harmonic arrangements, but (I think) well suited to tunes with lots of notes and certainly more typical of what's expected on the English concertina. I'll post others in this style as well as the harmony style in the future.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=FDbwbvVWOiM

Hope you like it,
Mark Gilston
http://markgilston.com/




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users