Jump to content


Photo

What Accompanies A Concertina Well?


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#1 Priscilla

Priscilla

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 53 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:western Pennsylvania

Posted 16 October 2008 - 09:48 AM

I'm learning classical guitar, and flirting with the idea of learning concertina...though it seems exponentially more puzzling than classical guitar. However, be that as it may, my best friend plays concertina, so I really want find an instrument just born to accompany the concertina. At NESI 2008 I listened all weekend, loved the music, and it seemed to me that fiddle accompanies the concertina magnificiently, but perhaps there are other suggestions as well? Perhaps anything and everything. Concertinas don't seem to be snobs, they get along with everyone...how does that poem go? "(Nature) lives and loves in every place, calls nothing she meets with base"...that must go for concertinas too! Always finding friends wherever she goes. Dignified and solemn as well as wild and rambuctious. So, what do you think is the ideal instrument to accompany a concertina? ...another concertina? (of course I suppose it depends *a little bit* on the type of music you want to play, but that aside)
thanks for your inspiring ideas!
Priscilla

#2 Dave Rogers

Dave Rogers

    Chatty concertinist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 307 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cheshire, UK

Posted 16 October 2008 - 09:57 AM

One of my all-time favourite albums is "The Lady and the Unicorn" by John Renbourn (a mixture of renaissance, baroque and folk tunes mostly played on guitar).

On one or two tracks, Alf Edwards on English concertina plays along with guitar, fiddle and flute and it sounds great. So all three of those instruments would get my vote!

I've also heard Alistair Anderson play EC along with fiddle, viola and cello, which also sounded pretty amazing.

How about clarsach too?

Edited by Dave Rogers, 16 October 2008 - 09:57 AM.


#3 Lakeland Fiddler

Lakeland Fiddler

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lancashire, UK

Posted 16 October 2008 - 10:21 AM

One of my favorite albums atm is New Dogs, Old Tricks. Emma Reid (fiddle) Robert Harbron (English concertina).

#4 fiddlerjoebob

fiddlerjoebob

    Chatty concertinist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 165 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Vermont, USA

Posted 16 October 2008 - 10:29 AM

Lets see...what accompanies a concertina well....? Hmmm....

I guess I prefer a strong, home-brewed beer, but others, I'm sure, would choose a nice wine or even strong spirits.

fjb

#5 Larry Stout

Larry Stout

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 589 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Normal, IL

Posted 16 October 2008 - 10:30 AM

Concertinas don't seem to be snobs, they get along with everyone...how does that poem go? "(Nature) lives and loves in every place, calls nothing she meets with base"...that must go for concertinas too! Always finding friends wherever she goes. Dignified and solemn as well as wild and rambuctious. So, what do you think is the ideal instrument to accompany a concertina? ...another concertina? (of course I suppose it depends *a little bit* on the type of music you want to play, but that aside)
thanks for your inspiring ideas!
Priscilla


Last January I did a gig with a friend who plays harp-- it goes very nicely with concertina, particularly for some of the O'Carolan airs. That combination also appears on Sheefra's CD _The Water Kelpie_. Danny Chapman has done some nice stuff with concertina and cello on Scottish tunes, many of which were written for violin and cello.

#6 chris

chris

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Leicestershire

Posted 16 October 2008 - 10:37 AM

Hi
Jody Kruskal's done some really good stuff with Northumbrian pipes and fiddle
Alastair Anderson's done some superb concerts with Martin Simpson on Guitar
concertina and concertina's good


But a pint of 'Landlord' is also verrry good :D
chris

#7 spindizzy

spindizzy

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 843 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cheshire, UK

Posted 16 October 2008 - 11:04 AM

Hi
Jody Kruskal's done some really good stuff with Northumbrian pipes and fiddle
Alastair Anderson's done some superb concerts with Martin Simpson on Guitar
concertina and concertina's good


But a pint of 'Landlord' is also verrry good :D
chris


I've played along with Northumbrian pipes at a session a while ago and the two mesh very well, the sounds are both in the same family though and a bit of contrast might be better.
Yesterday we had a hammered dulcimer at the session and that was a good sound. I usually practise with DH who plays fiddle and I think that's the best for duets (but I might be biased :D )

BTW This could go in the recordings link, our session visitors bringing a touch of class, were 3/4 of the Rising Sun Band (Paul Walker EC, JohnHarrison fiddle/mandolin and Jenny Coxon HD) - they have some great track samples on their webpage with some lively lancashire tunes (and of course Paul Walker on EC)

No Landlord but an acceptable Black Sheep

Chris

Edited by spindizzy, 16 October 2008 - 11:05 AM.


#8 Anglo-Irishman

Anglo-Irishman

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1204 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Near Stuttgart, Germany

Posted 16 October 2008 - 04:05 PM

So, what do you think is the ideal instrument to accompany a concertina? ...another concertina? (of course I suppose it depends *a little bit* on the type of music you want to play, but that aside)
thanks for your inspiring ideas!
Priscilla


Priscilla,
I play the Anglo concertina, so I'm sometimes the accompanist, sometimes the accompanied!

A very nice combination is playing a melody with feeling (not a jig or reel!) on the Anglo with a good, picked, nylon-strung folk guitar.
In our group, we do a few Carolan tunes (notably Planxty Irwin and Sí Bheag, Sí Mhor) with the melody line on the concertina, a counter-melody on the fiddle, and a basso continuo of steel-strung guitar and bowed double bass. Also very nice.
I have also done a couple of home recordings with Anglo concertina and autoharp accompaniment. I can't do them live, because I'm the only person far and wide who plays either concertina or autoharp! If I keep the autoharp part very simple, I can use chords sparingly on the Anglo. Also sounds fine.

In the accompaniment role, I often play chords to our fiddler's jigs and hornpipes. Together, we create the impression of an uileann piper who uses the regulators a lot. Dabbing the chords on the off-beats, or holding them over a couple of bars, as pipers do, peps up the rhythm no end!

This is all under the general heading of "folk". If you're playing English concertina and are more classically oriented, I'm sure a piano accompaniment would sound great.

Cheers,
John

#9 yankeeclipper

yankeeclipper

    Chatty concertinist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 277 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Saint Paul MN USA

Posted 16 October 2008 - 04:43 PM

At our community music sessions, I've been playing duets with a neighbor who plays both clarinet and oboe. We've done everything from classical (Pachelbel, 'Canon in D') and klezmer ('Yoshke Yoshke', 'Tangissimo') to ragtime (Scott Joplin's 'The Entertainer') and folk ('Si Bheag, Si Mhor', 'Swallowtail Jig'). The clarinet's rich, deep tone works especially well with the EC treble playing in the upper registers. Of course, guitar accompaniment is always welcome, too!

#10 LDT

LDT

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1435 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:UK, Essex

Posted 17 October 2008 - 06:30 AM

Doors being slammed usually accompanies my playing...but I wouldn't say well. ;)

#11 Mark Evans

Mark Evans

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1674 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Milford, MA.

Posted 17 October 2008 - 07:46 AM

I know what doesn't work very well with concertina...dobro. :blink: A ceiling fan going above yer head on the bluegrass favorite Down Yonder adds to the hideous humiliation. What was I thinking? Ah, Jack Daniels shots with Budwiser shorties and an early, early morning jam session...wasn't thinking :ph34r: .

Edited by Mark Evans, 17 October 2008 - 10:03 AM.


#12 Robert Booth

Robert Booth

    Chatty concertinist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 418 posts
  • Location:the coast range, 'tween the oaks and the firs

Posted 17 October 2008 - 06:00 PM

So that was Alf Edwards on The Lady and the Unicorn... thanks for that bit- I'd often wondered.
EC or AC?

As for the real topic, I like a chromatic harmonica with concertina: the voices like each other.

And Mark, isn't it time you consideder the merits of homebrewing? Bud, for all love!
Remember: Buy a man a sixpack, he drinks for a day; teach a man to brew he drinks for a lifetime.

Edited by Robert Booth, 17 October 2008 - 06:03 PM.


#13 Mark Evans

Mark Evans

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1674 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Milford, MA.

Posted 17 October 2008 - 06:33 PM

And Mark, isn't it time you consideder the merits of homebrewing? Bud, for all love!


And don't think I'm not ashamed! 3:00 in the a.m. and that's what we were down to. JD and Bud...I paid for that choice and then some. It has been a few years and I've mended my ways.

#14 yankeeclipper

yankeeclipper

    Chatty concertinist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 277 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Saint Paul MN USA

Posted 17 October 2008 - 06:48 PM

Buy a man a sixpack, he drinks for a day; teach a man to brew he drinks for a lifetime.

Never had the patience to brew, but it hasn't stopped me from drinking for a lifetime. :D

#15 Robert Booth

Robert Booth

    Chatty concertinist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 418 posts
  • Location:the coast range, 'tween the oaks and the firs

Posted 17 October 2008 - 07:19 PM

Yes, well, it is a team sport, innit?
Which often leads to song and whatever ragged assemblage of instruments which happen by. Hobson's choice ain't always so bad, but just let's call it innovation to make it sound better. ;)

#16 Chris Timson

Chris Timson

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3345 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bradford on Avon

Posted 18 October 2008 - 02:37 AM

At NESI 2008 I listened all weekend, loved the music, and it seemed to me that fiddle accompanies the concertina magnificiently,

I do agree that concertina and fiddle go particularly well with each other ... but ... the fiddle has to be played exactly in tune or else you hear an awful dissonance. You don't hear this if the fiddle is being accompanied by, say, a melodeon. I suspect there is a similarity in the timbres of the two instruments that is responsible for both the beauty and the beast.

As to how I know this, well Anne has been learning the fidle the last few years and recently the incidence of dissonance has been markely decreasing, and beauty is correspondingly on the increase when we play together.

Chris

#17 michael sam wild

michael sam wild

    Ineluctable Opinionmaker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2625 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sheffield UK

Posted 18 October 2008 - 05:26 AM

I really like the Anglo together with irish pipes and they are amongst my favourite CDs . I like to play along to records by Johnny Doran and Paddy Keenan and Tommy Mc Carthy as pipers aren't too thick on the ground at sessions round here in Sheffield at the moment. Kitty Hayes and Peter Laban sound nice together. The Anglo goes nicely with Northumbrian pipes too.

#18 Chris Drinkwater

Chris Drinkwater

    Heavyweight Boxer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1538 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 19 October 2008 - 05:32 AM

At an English session I went to recently, I heard someone playing a tune (Sommarvals) on the English concertina, accompanied by another musician playing the melody on the mandolin. It was a tune that no one else knew, so no other musicians joined in. The sounds produced by the two instruments on reeds and strings, suited the tune perfectly and to my hearing, was a lovely combination. I expect the type of tune, the skill of the musicans and their timing also had something do do with it. I also like the combination of the EC and the harp, as found on a couple of tracks on English International.

Chris

Edited by Chris Drinkwater, 23 October 2008 - 12:33 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users