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Have I Murdered This Tune?


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#1 LDT

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 02:49 PM

Before I drove myself and everyone at home slightly nuts playing twinkle little star and frere jaques over and over again....I tried another tune.


after 3 days practicing
http://www.soundlant...a...2&Path=null

Edited by LDT, 08 September 2008 - 03:30 AM.


#2 Lakeland Fiddler

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 03:02 PM

Yay! You did it LDT! :) You've got the right idea, make sure you've got the right notes and the right time value for each note and play at a tempo you can manage; speed will come later.

#3 PeterT

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 04:11 PM

after 3 days practicing
http://www.soundlant...a...2&Path=null

Hi LDT.

Well; it's coming along! All you need now is a bit more practice, which will give you more confidence, and there'll be no stopping you.

Once you are happy playing the tune in "C", one option could be to push it up into "G". This has the advantage of moving all of the melody onto the right hand (subject to the way you finger certain notes) and will free up the left hand for chords etc. Then you'll really be motoring. This is an "English style" way of playing.

Well done, so far.

Regards,
Peter.

#4 Lakeland Fiddler

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Posted 07 September 2008 - 04:13 PM

Yay! You did it LDT!


Oops! That didn't come across how I intended it :wacko: No you didn't murder the tune. Like Dick says, that was a good effort.

#5 Rod

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 03:06 AM

Yay! You did it LDT!


Oops! That didn't come across how I intended it :wacko: No you didn't murder the tune. Like Dick says, that was a good effort.


Well done LDT. 'The Sailors Hornpipe' is by no means the easiest tune to perform to perfection, at speed, on an Anglo.... but an excellent exercise. Master that one and you will certainly be well on the way.

#6 LDT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 03:29 AM

Once you are happy playing the tune in "C", one option could be to push it up into "G". This has the advantage of moving all of the melody onto the right hand (subject to the way you finger certain notes) and will free up the left hand for chords etc. Then you'll really be motoring. This is an "English style" way of playing.

how does moving to G make it all on one hand? I'm just following what's written down I don't know how to choose what buttons are best.

#7 PeterT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 04:10 AM

Once you are happy playing the tune in "C", one option could be to push it up into "G". This has the advantage of moving all of the melody onto the right hand (subject to the way you finger certain notes) and will free up the left hand for chords etc. Then you'll really be motoring. This is an "English style" way of playing.

how does moving to G make it all on one hand? I'm just following what's written down I don't know how to choose what buttons are best.

Hi LDT,

All I'd say is that I would view what is written down as a "starting point". Nothing wrong with playing a tune exactly as written, but there are other options like transposing it into another key, if you wish. This may be about three or four lessons down the line!

If you take another look at the video of me fingering scales in the key of "G", you'll see why one option (played in the higher octave) moves the melody almost exclusively onto the right hand. However, I note from another thread that you might not want to go this route.

Regards,
Peter.

#8 LDT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 04:14 AM

All I'd say is that I would view what is written down as a "starting point". Nothing wrong with playing a tune exactly as written, but there are other options like transposing it into another key, if you wish. This may be about three or four lessons down the line!

If you take another look at the video of me fingering scales in the key of "G", you'll see why one option (played in the higher octave) moves the melody almost exclusively onto the right hand. However, I note from another thread that you might not want to go this route.

I'm just finding it hard to get my left and right hand to do different stuff at the same time. *silly brain of mine* and its really fustrating me.

plus I'm not sure how it should sound a lot of the time. attempting and failing to read the music I came up with a completely different tune first off till I found the track on the tune-o-tron. :( :huh:

Edited by LDT, 08 September 2008 - 04:17 AM.


#9 PeterT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 04:22 AM

I'm just finding it hard to get my left and right hand to do different stuff at the same time. *silly brain of mine* and its really fustrating me.

No, this is quite normal!!!

I believe the key to unlocking the potential of the Anglo is to get both hands working together. It means slow progress at the outset, but gives the "building blocks" which can then be used for more complex tunes in the future. I've had a pupil visiting over the last few months, and I've been using him as a "guinnea pig" on a few teaching ideas (I have to be careful, since I know he reads this Forum!). We are concentrating on using both hands on relatively simple, but nice, tunes.

Regards,
Peter.

#10 LDT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 04:32 AM

I'm just finding it hard to get my left and right hand to do different stuff at the same time. *silly brain of mine* and its really fustrating me.

No, this is quite normal!!!

I believe the key to unlocking the potential of the Anglo is to get both hands working together. It means slow progress at the outset, but gives the "building blocks" which can then be used for more complex tunes in the future. I've had a pupil visiting over the last few months, and I've been using him as a "guinnea pig" on a few teaching ideas (I have to be careful, since I know he reads this Forum!). We are concentrating on using both hands on relatively simple, but nice, tunes.

Regards,
Peter.


I think I set too high a goals for myself. My mum keeps reminding me that I've only been playing for just over a week and I've only practiced that tune for 3 days. But it feels like much longer to me. I've got to be a bit more patient.

#11 Alan Day

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 04:36 AM

LTD - If you have not found it already have a listen to my tutor which explains the principle I used at the early stages of my Anglo playing to play tune right hand with accompaniment left.Even if you do not like my teaching methods there are some good tunes on there
http://www.etanbenam...ncertina Tutor/ Just click on the link under Etan's photo.
Al

#12 PeterT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 05:04 AM

I think I set too high a goals for myself. My mum keeps reminding me that I've only been playing for just over a week and I've only practiced that tune for 3 days. But it feels like much longer to me. I've got to be a bit more patient.

Patience is also key to becoming a musician. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that by doubling the amount of practice time you will reach your "goals" faster. At the early stages, at least, this is not the case. Learning is about discovering the "keys" which open the doors to more, and more advanced, learning.

Too many potential musicians get frustrated by lack of progress, and lose heart. However, it seems like you are asking the right questions, which will enable you to follow the learning path which is best for yourself.

Regards,
Peter.

#13 LDT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 09:20 AM

The same tune plus another one.
http://uk.youtube.co...h?v=9hny7vCct0w
I chose to learn two coz then I can alternate and not drive everyone too nuts at home with the repetition. lol!

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that by doubling the amount of practice time you will reach your "goals" faster.

ah...so that's doesn't work then?

I think my ambition outstrips my ability and talent currently.

Edited by LDT, 08 September 2008 - 11:01 AM.


#14 PeterT

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 11:07 AM

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that by doubling the amount of practice time you will reach your "goals" faster.

ah...so that's doesn't work then?

It all depends on the person, and how you are able to learn.

Yes; you obviously have to practice, but I believe it's about "smart" learning; knowing how/when to seek out a new technique which will stretch your ability just enough to make the next forward step.

#15 Dirge

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 02:03 PM

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that by doubling the amount of practice time you will reach your "goals" faster.

ah...so that's doesn't work then?

It all depends on the person, and how you are able to learn.

Yes; you obviously have to practice, but I believe it's about "smart" learning; knowing how/when to seek out a new technique which will stretch your ability just enough to make the next forward step.


I'd beg to differ, Peter, my theory is that there is no substitute for time spent handling your instrument; even if you aren't being very focussed that particular day it still helps to increase your familiarity with the thing.

I wouldn't argue that the way to move on fastest is to keep aiming for the almost unplayable, though.

#16 Leo

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 03:28 PM

Hi LDT

What Peter says works. Smart practice and building blocks pay, not necessarily quantity. In the beginning there are relatively few blocks to build on, and there may be a need when trying a new task, to digest the new information, (read take a break for a few minits), and then come back to the task.

Frequently an "AHAH!! I get it" will come faster after the break as the new information gets digested than working into a frustrating "Why isn't it coming?".

There is an old addage in learning that says "If you do something wrong enough, long enough, you get good at it."

Might I suggest playing for about 15 minits, and then take a 15 minit break, and then play for only about 30 minits. Repeat after about a half hour. The brain needs some time to digest.

I'll bet that's why in schools, the classes are only about an hour long.

By the way, you're doing fine. In the beginning, it was almost a week before my son said he recognised the tune. You've done it after only a few days. Good job! Keep up the good work.

Thanks :D
Leo

#17 m3838

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 11:31 PM

The same tune plus another one.
http://uk.youtube.co...h?v=9hny7vCct0w
I chose to learn two coz then I can alternate and not drive everyone too nuts at home with the repetition. lol!

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that by doubling the amount of practice time you will reach your "goals" faster.

ah...so that's doesn't work then?

I think my ambition outstrips my ability and talent currently.


A nice little (or even nicer bigger) metronome, used sparingly, will do a world of difference. You'll notice peculiar behavior from it: it will change tempo at will, while you'll be keeping perfect rhythm. Follow the "wrong" one.
Are you learning from printed music? Make sure you count rhythm of each measure before you play it.
But better off, find the tunes on Youtube and listen to them. You can record Youtube video, then slow it down with Audacity or Amazing Slowdowner, and then play together with the slowed down recording.
Another little trick is to learn just one measure or phrase. Until you play it smoothly, at correct rhythm, without mistakes. Then go to next measure or phrase. You don't have to practice pieces that are easier for you. Start with difficult ones. Get them up to speed of easier, so your playing will have even tempo.
Out of curiosity, can you hear that your tempo is uneven, or simply some pieces are more difficult and you can't play them at the set speed?
Here's a good example at your speed:
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=ZUYmXAhxrt4 - winster gallop

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related - My love she's but a lassie yet. Lovely dancing.

Edited by m3838, 08 September 2008 - 11:39 PM.


#18 LDT

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 03:21 AM

What Peter says works. Smart practice and building blocks pay, not necessarily quantity. In the beginning there are relatively few blocks to build on, and there may be a need when trying a new task, to digest the new information, (read take a break for a few minits), and then come back to the task.

That's what I started off doing.....then I thought I'd increase my practice time....but it hasn't work. I'll have to go back to a bit of practice before dinner a break to eat then an hour afterwards.

Frequently an "AHAH!! I get it" will come faster after the break as the new information gets digested than working into a frustrating "Why isn't it coming?".

yeasterday I got so fustrated I nearly chucked the concertina across the room...but I have more self control than that. But it gets so fustrating when I see people find music so easy and I find it such a struggle.

By the way, you're doing fine. In the beginning, it was almost a week before my son said he recognised the tune. You've done it after only a few days. Good job! Keep up the good work.

I find it hard to judge if I'm progressing well or not as I don't have a mesuring stick to know if I'm doing well or not in comparison to other beginners.


A nice little (or even nicer bigger) metronome, used sparingly, will do a world of difference. You'll notice peculiar behavior from it: it will change tempo at will, while you'll be keeping perfect rhythm. Follow the "wrong" one.

There's a metronone on garageband on my mac..but I turn it off coz I find it distracting and it never goes the same speed as me.


Out of curiosity, can you hear that your tempo is uneven, or simply some pieces are more difficult and you can't play them at the set speed?

Can't play them at speed...and coz I'm not familiar with the tune I can forget it (how it should sound) halfway through a lot. :(

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=ZUYmXAhxrt4 - winster gallop

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related - My love she's but a lassie yet. Lovely dancing.

I'll never get that fast. :(




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