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Anglo Concertina - Tablature.


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#19 meltzer

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 04:14 PM

it seems that everyone just makes up their own accompanyment - is this the case?


I know I do. :blink: It's one of the ways that English-style anglo players get their individual sounds. An accompaniment that I played would look and sound completely different to one of Peter's because (1) he's a far better player than I am and (2) like everybody else, we've absorbed different styles & influences over the years.

and if so would it be possible to make a video of a typical accompanyment? Oh dear I bet you are all laughing now, sorry if this is a daft question :rolleyes:

Cheers
Angie

No such thing as a daft question, Angie. B)

#20 PeterT

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 04:51 PM

I watch your videos to try to see what the accompanying hand is doing, and this is the hard part because it seems that everyone just makes up their own accompanyment - is this the case? and if so would it be possible to make a video of a typical accompanyment? Oh dear I bet you are all laughing now, sorry if this is a daft question :rolleyes:

Hi Angie,

I think this is known as "the joy of playing the Anglo"! Within what might be loosely termed "English Country Music", there do, indeed, seem to be many variations on the style of accompaniment. Part of this will come from playing in (say) G on a C/G v's a G/D box, or in D on a C/G v's G/D.

All I can offer to do is show the type of accompaniment which I use for a particular tune. It might then be interesting to see whether other C.net members might post recordings of their playing of the same, or similar, tune.

I did hope that when I started recording, a few months back, many others might add their contributions, but I guess that many who could are actually out playing to earn a living.

Regards,
Peter.

#21 PeterT

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 04:55 PM

An accompaniment that I played would look and sound completely different to one of Peter's because (1) he's a far better player than I am and (2) like everybody else, we've absorbed different styles & influences over the years.

I think you are being a little modest, Nigel. It's more to do with the number of years that I have been playing. You'll close the gap soon enough!

Regards,
Peter.

#22 meltzer

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Posted 13 April 2008 - 05:29 PM

An accompaniment that I played would look and sound completely different to one of Peter's because (1) he's a far better player than I am and (2) like everybody else, we've absorbed different styles & influences over the years.

I think you are being a little modest, Nigel. It's more to do with the number of years that I have been playing. You'll close the gap soon enough!

Regards,
Peter.

Thanks for that, Peter. I live in hope.

I've had to ban myself from listening to Peter Bellamy lately, ever since I thought I'd come up with a new and distinctive arrangement of The trees they do grow high, and then listened to the version on Both sides then -- only to realise that it was basically the same without the drone keys. :lol:

#23 Angie Burn

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 02:23 PM

All I can offer to do is show the type of accompaniment which I use for a particular tune. It might then be interesting to see whether other C.net members might post recordings of their playing of the same, or similar, tune.

Thanks Peter,
That would be very useful...just to hear the type of accompaniment which you use for a particular tune. I feel that I just need a couple of ideas to start me off, as I realise that everyone has their own style. Who knows, somebody else might take up your suggestion and record their version of the same tune.

Thanks all,

Angie

#24 Henk van Aalten

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 12:40 AM

Returning to the subject of tablature.. In this post I used a tablature that is more or less copied from the tablature that is used for the harmonica (melodeon / box) in the Netherlands.
Up till now it has been very helpfull for those beginners that can not read the dots. Together with the tablature a sound sample must be available.

#25 PeterT

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 03:12 PM

All I can offer to do is show the type of accompaniment which I use for a particular tune. It might then be interesting to see whether other C.net members might post recordings of their playing of the same, or similar, tune.

Thanks Peter,
That would be very useful...just to hear the type of accompaniment which you use for a particular tune. I feel that I just need a couple of ideas to start me off, as I realise that everyone has their own style. Who knows, somebody else might take up your suggestion and record their version of the same tune.

Thanks all,

Angie

Hi Angie,

Sorry for the delay. I've given some thought as to a "likely candidate", plus I've had problems with my hearing (again!) in recent days, so haven't felt much like playing music (or doing anything else, for that matter).

Anyway, I've concluded that "Bugeilio'r Gwenith Gwyn" would be suitable, since it's (1) slow, (2) not too complex an accompaniment.

I begin with filming of the right hand, then I show more of the left hand in the rest of the video:
http://uk.youtube.co...h?v=nReI6UejLbo

Regards,
Peter.

Edited to add YouTube video link.

Edited by PeterT, 22 April 2008 - 10:38 AM.


#26 PeterT

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 10:04 AM

That would be very useful...just to hear the type of accompaniment which you use for a particular tune. I feel that I just need a couple of ideas to start me off, as I realise that everyone has their own style.

Hi Angie,

I think that the first "idea" is to demonstrate how I finger scales in C and G (on a C/G Anglo). I appreciate that other players will finger differently, but if you understand what I "normally" do, it should help when you watch any of my videos.

The attached tablature, which I prepared for another new player, shows what I do for the melody, which I try to keep mainly on the right hand of the instrument.

A good (and I think, important) exercise is to learn the fingering for the C scales (as shown), and then work them out yourself for the left hand (an octave lower). The important learning step is then to be able to play the right and left hands simultaneously.

What you will notice is that when, on the right hand, the finger moves from one button to the next to play the next note in the scale, on the left hand the finger remains on the same button, but the bellows reversal gives you the next note in the scale. Similarly, when, on the right hand, the bellows reversal gives the next note in the scale, with the finger remaining on the same button, on the left hand the finger needs to move to the next button.

The above sounds complex to describe, but it is easier to work out with the concertina in your hands.

Hope that this is of use.

Regards,
Peter.

Attached Files


Edited by PeterT, 22 April 2008 - 10:06 AM.


#27 Angie Burn

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 02:54 PM

Hi Peter

Many thanks for taking the time to do this, especially if you haven't been feeling too good. I'm sorry to learn that you have problems with your hearing, what a terrible blow for a musician like yourself.

The video is great, because I can see what your left hand is doing, so it will be very useful to me. Also I've printed out the tablature and your post about the scales so I can concentrate on what you are saying. I'm 60 and never played any instrument in my life, but always wanted to try so I decided the Anglo Concertina was the instrument for me.

The trouble is when you get older it isn't as easy to learn things but determination will get me there in the end!

Thanks again,

Angie

#28 PeterT

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 03:58 PM

I'm sorry to learn that you have problems with your hearing, what a terrible blow for a musician like yourself.

Hi Angie,

Thanks! It's frustrating, as much as anything. I've felt a lot better, today, so pressed ahead with the recording.

Glad that you've found the video of use; keep us posted regarding your progress.

Regards,
Peter.



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