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Wheatstone Linota


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#1 Clinton Lofgren

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:49 PM

Because of the rise in building materials I have to sell another concertina.The price of just plywood alone has gone up from 11 dollars a sheet to 28 dollars since the war in Iraq and Katrina.
I have a black Linota serial number 31841 .The reeds still have the original factory tuning which is 1/4 step high or sharp of a CG tuned in A440 concert pitch. the reeds are brilliant and chirp when using grace notes. the inside of the concertina is in excellant condition.It would be hard to find a Linota that sounds as good as this one.It has the original bellows that will have to be replace soon.The bellows have been patched but are air tight now as well as the rest of the instrument.If I wasn't building a new house for myself I would not be selling it. The price is high and only those that are seriously interested are asked to contact me. I will e-mail pictures to interested parties. The price is 11,500 US clint_lofgren@hotmail .com

#2 Chris Timson

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 01:22 AM

The price is high

6000 pounds for a Linota in old pitch and with old bellows. I agree, the price is high.

Chris

#3 Daniel Hersh

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 02:26 AM

The price is high

6000 pounds for a Linota in old pitch and with old bellows. I agree, the price is high.

Chris

Indeed. I believe that it's substantially higher than any price I've ever heard quoted for any concertina.

Daniel

Edited by Daniel Hersh, 12 July 2006 - 02:27 AM.


#4 Paul Read

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 07:48 AM

I guess the value depends on how much someone who really wants one of these is prepared to pay but an equivalent Jeffries seems to currently go around GBP4000 - 4500 restored.

Edited by Paul Read, 12 July 2006 - 07:49 AM.


#5 Clinton Lofgren

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 10:55 AM

When I was in the market to buy a Jeffries CG I looked high and low for one that could be a top grade Jeffries that had all the qualities that the almighty Jeffries name invokes. Not one person was willing to make the claim that the Jeffries they had was top grade.Actually I was told that people that have have them don't sell them.Yes Jeffries sell for 4000 to 4500 pounds, but more than likely and I have been told this by people in the buisness they aren't top quality. I put an add in the concertina.net looking for one and none of you responded. would any of be willing to part with a great Jeffries for 4000 or 4500 pounds if you didn't know if you could get another one. This Linota I have been told by more than one expert is more rare that a top Jeffries.It hasn't been sitting in a closet rusting and cracking,and nobody has filed the brilliance away because they didn't know what they were doing or didn't care .

#6 Toireasa Breathnach

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 11:02 AM

I guess the value depends on how much someone who really wants one of these is prepared to pay but an equivalent Jeffries seems to currently go around GBP4000 - 4500 restored.

A friend of mine recently sold a Wheatstone linota 40 key anglo in perfect condition, for 4500 euros.

#7 PeterT

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 11:58 AM

This Linota I have been told by more than one expert is more rare that a top Jeffries.

Hi Clinton,

Almost certainly true, and your asking price reflects that. However, if it had been a C/G or G/D, you would have a queue of people wanting to buy.

Let's hope that you find a buyer who wants a box in this tuning; at least by asking a premium price, it will not be bought by someone wanting to tune it down to C/G.

Regards,
Peter.

Edited by PeterT, 12 July 2006 - 12:03 PM.


#8 Chris Timson

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 06:09 PM

This Linota I have been told by more than one expert is more rare that a top Jeffries

We have a Lachenal Accordiaphone. It is only of only 4 in existence (and one of those others is not playable). It is as rare and historically interesting as concertinas get. We'd still be lucky to get a couple of thousand quid for it if we sold it (which we're not). Rarity in itself is not enough to ensure a premium price. And you are asking a price that goes well beyond premium, and that's not even allowing for all the work that needs to be done to it.

Chris

#9 Clinton Lofgren

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 10:26 PM

I have played only a handful of instrument you can count them with less than 10 fingers.I just sold a Carroll which I stated was the best allround concertina I have had and that is true concidering I do play with a group.You can't play the Linota with them. When we have peformed at various events and everyone takes a break I fish the Linota out and play it solo. Usually when we play as a group people usually mill around shoot the breeze, eat, and drink. When I dig the Linota out and play it seems everytime people stop what they are doing and are only listening.That Linota cuts the air more clearly and bueatifully than any concertina I have played. In small rooms it can be to much.
Toireara the only 40 button Wheastones I have seen are 1950s models and there might be some that are not I would be interesteaded to know. Perfect condition doesn't mean perfect sound and of course nothing is perfect and Peter I don't think you can compare a Lachenal with a Wheatstone. I play a Lachenal with the group and it will be the only concertina I have left if I sell the Linota.
Paul Reed I would like to challenge you to find me a top grade Jeffries from 4000 to 4500 pounds.I would say to hell with it, buy it and go borrow money from the bank to finish my house and keep the Linota as well.
I mean know disrespect to any of you but I hope you are all wrong. Certainly anyone who reads this forum would probably feel foolish trying to buy this concertina .

#10 Clinton Lofgren

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 10:41 PM

Peter I mean't Chris . I'm very sorry. What you said is very correct

#11 Paul Read

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 05:26 AM

Paul Reed I would like to challenge you to find me a top grade Jeffries from 4000 to 4500 pounds.I would say to hell with it, buy it and go borrow money from the bank to finish my house and keep the Linota as well.
I mean know disrespect to any of you but I hope you are all wrong. Certainly anyone who reads this forum would probably feel foolish trying to buy this concertina .


Hi Clinton,

I'll keep an eye out for the Jeffries.

My fully restored top grade G/D Jeffries cost me GBP3600 less than a year ago, fully restored. The only downside is that it is a 28 button (although that hasn't caused me any problems). I must confess that I had to move fast but it was open to anyone on C.Net. Anyone who has heard this one has said it's the nicest Jeffries they've heard.

If you'd borrow the money from the bank and keep the Linota and the Jeffries, why don't you keep the Linota and do that anyway? The Linota will likely one day appreciate faster than most investments!

Like all sales, the test will be what someone is willing to pay; you only need one person. My comments were only based on watching the market. As you say, you don't see many Linotas so you may be lucky.

When I was looking for my Jeffries, Chris Algar was quoting around GBP4K (there was a selection of instruments). I'm glad to see you rate the Carroll highly, I'm next on the list for one - and the price is right!

#12 Dirge

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 02:28 PM

Slight diversion to fill one of many deficiencies in my concertina knowledge. What's the significance of the name linota?

#13 PeterT

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 04:53 PM

What's the significance of the name linota?

There are a few old postings which go into more detail.

Basically, as I understand it, it was a Wheatstone sub branding for their Anglos. My Linota was built in 1918, and is first rate (very fast, quite loud), and I think that those built 10 years later (Ebony wood trim) were equally good. However, my opinion is that some built with Rosewood trim were not quite so good (I had one made in 1927).

Regards,
Peter.

#14 Pete Dickey

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 04:57 PM

Here is I think the last Linota sold on Ebay.

Item number: 7417517524

Pretty poor condition generally reflected in the price. GBP2600 is still a long, long way from GBP6200.

Just for the record this is my pride and joy Linota bought a few months ago for significantly less than either of the above. Excellent condition with GD tuning and plays beautifully but there is something about my GD Jeffries that this just doesn't have - perhaps it's the height of the action or strength of the springs coupled with the sharp edges of the buttons.

However notwithstanding the above, I had a little play of Chris Timson's new Jeffries a couple of weeks ago and that has got to be approaching perfection - beautifully responsive great looking and excellent action.

Pete

Attached Thumbnails

  • Wheatstone_Linota_40_key_GD_1914___26375___Dec_2005____2.jpg

Edited by Pete Dickey, 13 July 2006 - 05:10 PM.


#15 PeterT

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 05:14 PM

Just for the record this is my pride and joy Linota bought a few months ago.....

Let me guess, Pete, without knowing the number. Later than 1914, but earlier than 1918.

I had a 40 key of 1914 vintage, with this type of strap fitting, but over-lapping metal ends. My current 36 key of 1918 vintage has these inset metal ends, but modified strap fittings (no top screw).

Regards,
Peter.

#16 Chris Drinkwater

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:52 PM

What's the significance of the name linota?

There are a few old postings which go into more detail.

Basically, as I understand it, it was a Wheatstone sub branding for their Anglos. My Linota was built in 1918, and is first rate (very fast, quite loud), and I think that those built 10 years later (Ebony wood trim) were equally good. However, my opinion is that some built with Rosewood trim were not quite so good (I had one made in 1927).

Regards,
Peter.



You had one made in 1927, Peter? Gosh, I didn't know you were that old. Well, in that case, you are incredibly well preserved, just like your Linota. Have you undergone any restoration? :rolleyes:

Chris

#17 PeterT

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 02:53 AM

Have you undergone any restoration? :rolleyes:

Ho ho! :D

Hi Chris,

Yes, I had repairs done to the wrist in 1960 (which limits the time I spend playing).

Regards,
Peter.

#18 Pete Dickey

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 08:16 PM

Just for the record this is my pride and joy Linota bought a few months ago.....

Let me guess, Pete, without knowing the number. Later than 1914, but earlier than 1918.

I had a 40 key of 1914 vintage, with this type of strap fitting, but over-lapping metal ends. My current 36 key of 1918 vintage has these inset metal ends, but modified strap fittings (no top screw).

Regards,
Peter.



Thats pretty good Peter. Horniman Ledgers say April 2nd 1914 for serial number 26375 ;)




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