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Anglo Wizard


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#1 Flip Delport

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Posted 11 April 2005 - 01:36 PM

In my search for Anglo concertinas in South Africa, I found two 30 key instruments called "Anglo Wizard". Can anybody assist me in getting more information. I would like to know who made them and when they were made. The anatomy is clearly English.

Flip Delport

#2 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 07:52 AM

In my search for Anglo concertinas in South Africa, I found two 30 key instruments called "Anglo Wizard".

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Flip,

I have never heard of such a model, any chance of a photo ?

#3 Flip Delport

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 06:06 PM

I found another one today - Will get a photo within a week.

#4 Flip Delport

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 05:40 PM

Anglo_Wizard.jpg Anglo_Wizard1.jpg I received the attached photographs totday.

#5 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 05:54 PM

I received the attached photographs totday.

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Flip,

The cheap metal ends, with the name pressed into them, would remind me of the Wheatstone "MayFair" model, that was built between 1955-60. The "MayFair" used a distinctive mechanism, with the levers located by being "hooked" through the buttons at 90º to their length, and accordion reeds. Does any of that sound familiar ?

#6 shipcmo

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 03:35 AM

Looks like an early Bastari to me.
Cheers,
Geo

#7 Henk van Aalten

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 04:48 AM

The "MayFair" used a distinctive mechanism, with the levers located by being "hooked" through the buttons at 90º to their length, and accordion reeds. Does any of that sound familiar ?

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Stephen
You mean this (although not the MayFair inside, but from a Marcus)

Looks like an early Bastari to me.
Cheers,
Geo

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I share your opinion on this.

#8 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 04:59 AM

Looks like an early Bastari to me.

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George,

I very nearly commented that it looks like the inspiration for the Bastari end design, and Bastari certainly sold plenty of 2-rows in South Africa, so much so that the Zulus use the firm's name for the instrument.

But Flip reckons it is of English construction, and it would be my guess that one may have been sent to Bastari to copy.


You mean this (although not the MayFair inside, but from a Marcus)

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Henk,

Yes, that is Marcus' simplified version of the Wheatstone "MayFair" design.

#9 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 10:42 AM

I received the attached photographs totday.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The cheap metal ends, with the name pressed into them, would remind me of the Wheatstone "MayFair" model, that was built between 1955-60. The "MayFair" used a distinctive mechanism, with the levers located by being "hooked" through the buttons at 90º to their length, and accordion reeds. Does any of that sound familiar ?

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Flip,

If you could you get internal photographs, of the action and reeds, they could prove very revealing about the origins of this model. But my suspicion at the moment is that it may have been a special, inexpensive, Wheatstone model for the South African market.

#10 shipcmo

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 11:35 AM

Stephen,
I will take issue with you on it being a Wheatstone. The bellows are identical to early Bastari (and later Stagi), and the handstrap adjustment device is definitely Bastari, altho' the actual handstrap looks like Stagi. Plus the finish on the wooden ends is typical of Bastari/Stagi. I at would almost bet my Dipper (well, at least an old Scholer) on it!
Cheers,
Geo

Edited by shipcmo, 08 June 2005 - 11:38 AM.


#11 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 03:22 PM

I will take issue with you on it being a Wheatstone. The bellows are identical to early Bastari (and later Stagi)

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George,

Who knows, I'm only suggesting that as a possibility, and it is very hard to tell much from the photos, but Flip, who has seen them, says that "The anatomy is clearly English".

Anyway, the buttons look much too straight for a Bastari ;).


... the handstrap adjustment device is definitely Bastari

Ah, but Bastari stole that "handstrap adjustment device" from Wheatstone's, and the rails do look just like those of a "MayFair".


I would almost bet my Dipper (well, at least an old Scholer) on it!

Well let's just wait and see what internal photos might reveal !

(They could prove interesting, as there do appear to be some pads, and individual levers, visible through the slots in the middle of the end, as well as some at the edge above the buttons. Also it seems to be painted red inside, which is something you do find in late Wheatstones.)

But whatever they are, they don't seem to be known outside South Africa ?

Edited by Stephen Chambers, 08 June 2005 - 03:24 PM.


#12 Flip Delport

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 06:54 PM

Please ignore my comment that the anatomy is clearly English. It was just a thought that slipped out late at night. I do apologize. My information came from the owner during a telephone conversation. What I have to go on is the same as what you see on the photographs. I might have a chance this coming weekend to take photos of the inside.

Of the three Wizard Anglos I found, not one is in good playing order. It is a cheap product and not at all popular amongst our Anglo players. I have listed over 300 Anglos and only 3 were Wizards, a few South African made Wheatstone clones and 95% genuine Wheatstones. The most popular models in South Africa are the 40 key Anglos (6 A and 7 A). Italian models are not at all popular here. I do agree, it looks very much like a Bastardi . Stephen – the only MayFair that I have ever seen was the prototype in the Horniman Museum. We are not familiar with them in South Africa so I can not really compare.

#13 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 11:09 PM

Please ignore my comment that the anatomy is clearly English. It was just a thought that slipped out late at night. I do apologize.

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Ah, I had been basing my thinking on your assertion about the anatomy being clearly English, that puts a very different complexion on matters. Maybe it really is a very early Bastari after all ?

I do agree, it looks very much like a Bastardi .

Freudian slip ? :huh: ;)

Edited by Stephen Chambers, 08 June 2005 - 11:21 PM.


#14 shipcmo

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 11:29 PM

I had trouble getting adequate magnification of the pics, but with that, the levers that Stephen mentioned are clearly Bastari flat aluminum ones, with the pads glued on. Also with regard to the "red"; Bastari used a red grille cloth behind the end plates.
Cheers,
Geo

#15 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 10:10 PM

The bellows are identical to early Bastari (and later Stagi) ... Plus the finish on the wooden ends is typical of Bastari/Stagi.

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George,

It sounds like you got some much better quality Bastaris in the U.S., in the early years, than we ever saw in England, those look much better than any bellows I ever saw on one. But then, we didn't see any of them until 1974, when Neil Wayne started to sell the English models, and the "Anglos" didn't come along until sometime later (and the bellows on some of the more recent ones have been simply appalling !).

I never saw one with the "tramlines" cut into the side (English-style) though, as this Wizard Anglo has.

Perhaps the early ones had a much more "English" appearance ?

Cheers,

#16 shipcmo

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 11:57 PM

Stephen,
The term "tramlines" eludes me, but here is an illustration of that.very_early_pic.jpg

#17 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 03:46 PM

The term "tramlines" eludes me ...

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George,

Sorry, I guess I have been guilty of an inadvertent "Englishism". Mea culpa ! :(

Please read "streetcar tracks" for "tramlines". (You would think I had never been to New Orleans ! :rolleyes: )

In English usage the expression can be employed to describe two parallel grooves, like tramlines/streetcar tracks in a road, so what I meant are the two parallel grooves scribed/moulded around the sides of most English-made concertinas. They can be seen clearly in Flip's photo of the "Wizard".

I'm afraid I can't make out anything much in the Red Cap advertisement, in fact there is so little definition that I can't even tell that it is a Bastari W-15, but it looks rather as though the strap may be adjusted by small buckles, as they are today on that model, rather than the Wheatstone-style adjusters on the "Wizard" ? (Something which Bastari/Stagi/Brünner seem to have normally reserved for their higher grades).

We may yet arrive at some "pointers to dating your Bastari/Stagi/Brünner", with all this !

Cheers,

Edited for clarification.

Edited by Stephen Chambers, 18 October 2006 - 10:38 PM.


#18 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 09:37 PM

... the handstrap adjustment device is definitely Bastari

Ah, but Bastari stole that "handstrap adjustment device" from Wheatstone's, and the rails do look just like those of a "MayFair".

With the old computer that I had a year ago, it wasn't possible for me to post pictures to illustrate the similarities, but with my new computer that's no longer a problem. So here are pictures of a Wheatstone "MayFair" showing that same "handstrap adjustment device" :

Posted Image

And also c.1947 "South African" Wheatstone #51679, in almost "factory fresh" condition, displaying both "tramlines" and "handstrap adjustment device":

Posted Image

There seems to be a distinct Wheatstone influence on the external design of the "Wizard", not so evident in later Bastari instruments.




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