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Large Anglo Keyboard Numbering System

button numbering

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#19 waster

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 10:38 AM

C.net doesn't seem to like Excel attachments so I'll try a .pdf version of the map. Hope this works and helps clarify suggested method.


John.

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#20 John Wild

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 01:02 PM

You can upload files to an online storage service, like box.com, then paste a link in a forum post.



#21 hjcjones

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 06:09 AM

There is a very well-established tablature system for melodeon (CADB) and I've never understood why this hasn't been adopted for anglo concertina (possibly because it's French?). There is perhaps more variation in anglo keyboards, but melodeons are not all the same either and you may have to adapt a published version to suit your own instrument.  I tend to use tab as means of recording how I play something rather than a source of tunes. 

 

http://diato.org/exptab2.htm

 

I'm not sure I see the benefits of a system which simply identifies buttons if it doesn't also pay regard to the notes they play.  It might be useful for communicating with a repairer or comparing layouts, but a simple diagram is probably clearer and avoids any possible misinterpretation.  



#22 Anglo-Irishman

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 05:13 AM

I'm not sure I see the benefits of a system which simply identifies buttons if it doesn't also pay regard to the notes they play.  It might be useful for communicating with a repairer or comparing layouts, but a simple diagram is probably clearer and avoids any possible misinterpretation.  

You've hit the nail on the head!

 

Whenever we have some problem with a concertina, it usually crops up when we press a particular button. That means that we have to inspect a particular reed for dirt, damage or wear. But which one? We have to open the action box, trace the lever from the button that causes the symptom to the pad that covers the reed chamber containing the dubious reed, make a note of this, take the action box off and locate the chamber with the reed in question.

 

I've done this quite a bit on my Lachenal Crane, and when a reed problem cropped up on my Dallas-Crabb Anglo, I knew the procedure.

 

But I didn't need it! Crabb had been very maintenance-friendly, and each pair of reeds has a button number hand-written on the reedpan next to it. The button that I noticed the problem with was the middle one in the inner row, so I knew I had to inspect the reed labelled "C3".

 

Devilishly simple: the outer row is A, the middle row is B, and the inner row is C, and the buttons are numbered 1-5 from left to right. Each end of the concertina has the same system. It would work equally well for a big Anglo with four rows and six buttons to a row, or even for a Crane duet.

 

I attach photos of both sides of the RH reedpan of my Dallas-Crabb.

 

Cheers,

John

Attached Thumbnails

  • Dallas-Anglo08.jpg
  • Dallas-Anglo09.jpg


#23 alex_holden

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 06:31 AM

Whenever we have some problem with a concertina, it usually crops up when we press a particular button. That means that we have to inspect a particular reed for dirt, damage or wear. But which one? We have to open the action box, trace the lever from the button that causes the symptom to the pad that covers the reed chamber containing the dubious reed, make a note of this, take the action box off and locate the chamber with the reed in question.


Rather than opening the action box to look at the levers, it's quicker to press the button, flip the box over, and look for the open pad hole.

#24 adrian brown

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 03:52 PM

There is a very well-established tablature system for melodeon (CADB) and I've never understood why this hasn't been adopted for anglo concertina (possibly because it's French?). There is perhaps more variation in anglo keyboards, but melodeons are not all the same either and you may have to adapt a published version to suit your own instrument.  I tend to use tab as means of recording how I play something rather than a source of tunes. 

 

http://diato.org/exptab2.htm

 

I'm not sure I see the benefits of a system which simply identifies buttons if it doesn't also pay regard to the notes they play.  It might be useful for communicating with a repairer or comparing layouts, but a simple diagram is probably clearer and avoids any possible misinterpretation.  

 

I wonder if the problem isn't that it's French, but that rather the LH accompaniment is more complicated on an anglo? When I read on your link:

 

"For the left hand accompaniment (bass), the note itself is written for more precision (only one letter)(fig. 2). This allows a guitarist or other musician to play along."

 

that's all very well, but you have to "make" the chords yourself, with all the subtility that can involve. I think Gary's system with a mixture of treble stave/button numbers for the RH and chord letters with a kind of button tablature for the LH is very easy to understand and for many, easier than reading from a double stave. As I've said before here, I wish his books had been around when I stated learning.

 

Adrian





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