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Cites: Exporting Concertina Containing Rosewood


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#1 Theo

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 06:56 AM

I may be attempting to export a rosewood ended concertina from the UK to the USA.  I have the relevant forms and advice from the Animal and Plant Health Agency and I think I can see what is required.

 

Does anyone else have actual experience of operating this process?  Any advice gratefully received that might help me avoid mistakes.  In particular what sort of evidence did you use to demonstrate that the instrument was made before the cut off date for manufactured objects which I think is 1946.  The concertina is a Jones English.



#2 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 08:09 AM

Theo,

in reality this should not be a problem  as the CITES  regulations  relate to import /export  of commercial quantities of endangered  species  material  and anything under 10kgs  and anything for personal use  by the purchaser  should be exempt.

 

However, if you wish to obtain  a  CITES  passport  ( or whatever they call it)  you might  need to  get the age of  the instrument  verified by an expert ( official)  body, like a museum  .  I did this  for my  old  Uilleann Pipes  when I  visited  the USA  in 2002  because  the instrument contained Elephant Ivory  parts.  I  obtained a letter  of  verification for the date  of manufacture  from the Dublin Museum  curator of musicial instruments... even though  it was myself telling the curator  how old the instrument is.  This letter was then included  in an application to  the   relevant body... fisheries  and wildlife  or   the like...

 

So, I'd suggest  contacting   Neil Wayne  or the Horniman Museum.

 

I currently get around the  problem  of  exporting new instruments, containing materials  that could be construed  as endangered ,  by  either  having the customers  collect  them or  just avoiding making  for customers   from  outside Europe.

 

Good luck  with  this.

 

Geoff.   


Edited by Geoff Wooff, 05 August 2017 - 08:09 AM.


#3 Theo

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:33 AM

Much relief on my part the potential buyer has decided not to buy!



#4 Geoff Wooff

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 01:11 AM

A simple resolution  then Theo !

 

Perhaps  those in the  Antique  trade  have already addressed  this   problem  and could be a useful  channel  for  information  ?



#5 hjcjones

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 03:46 AM

There is now a scheme for an instrument "passport" although this is mainly aimed at travelling musicians, not sure if its applicable for cross-border sales.

 

https://www.musician...ff-4a3a36bf8a3b



#6 malcolm clapp

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 07:41 PM

I notice that a number of auction houses are now describing fairly obvious rosewood items just as "brown wood". Hmmm.



#7 Don Taylor

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 09:50 PM

May be time to ebonize with some black spirit polish (French polish)?

 

http://www.liberon.c...&cat=17&prod=78






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