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Does Anyone Recognize This Concertina?


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#1 winterblue

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 06:02 AM

Hello,

I am new to this forum; please forgive my immediate request for information (as i'm sure it can be seen as quite rude) but time is of the essence...

Can anyone identify the concertina below and tell me anything about it? Being a college student, the 60+ dollars this concertina costs is alot of money and I don't want to make an uninformed purchase...but at the same time...it's what i'd like a concertina I'd own to look like (it fits my personality and style perfectly).

The Concertina

If anyone could provide any insight or commentary, please do. Many thanks in advance.

EDIT: i realize that I should have put this post in another section of the forum, please forgive me.

Edited by winterblue, 22 January 2005 - 06:03 AM.


#2 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 08:55 AM

Hello,

That is an East German Galotta concertina, made in Klingenthal during the 1980's. They have steel reeds and play reasonably well, certainly better than most you will see on eBay. However, the 402 is not a limited edition number, but rather a Model number : I seem to recall that there was a 401, a 402 and a 403, the final digit denoting how many voices (sets of reeds) the instrument had.

It is probably well worth $60.00 or so, depending on condition.

#3 winterblue

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 10:26 AM

Hello,

That is an East German Galotta concertina, made in Klingenthal during the 1980's. They have steel reeds and play reasonably well, certainly better than most you will see on eBay. However, the 402 is not a limited edition number, but rather a Model number : I seem to recall that there was a 401, a 402 and a 403, the final digit denoting how many voices (sets of reeds) the instrument had.

It is probably well worth $60.00 or so, depending on condition.

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Thank you very much =)

#4 hielandman

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Posted 26 January 2005 - 07:58 AM

Hi, it is a Klingenthal, made in the German Democratic Republic(East Germany), probably during the 1980's. I have the exact one, (in G/D), and use it every weekend. It has double reeds, sounds nice, and works nice. Not as good as any English made one, but as nice as a Bastari, and sounds cleaner on the low notes. The nice thing about Klingenthals were that they were made in all the key combinations, not just C/G, G/D, and D/A, like most manufacturers offer. So you may be getting something quite interesting. I imagine that it will go for more than the sixty or so dollars that it is currently being bid at, but hey, who knows! Good luck, Don

PS- I forgot to mention that I have a sheet from Klingenthat listing all the models with the Key combinations, I will look for it tonight, and can tell you exactly what the reeds are pitched in(if I can find it!)

Edited by hielandman, 26 January 2005 - 11:11 AM.


#5 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 26 January 2005 - 12:38 PM

I have the exact one, (in G/D), and use it every weekend.  It has double reeds ... 

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It sounds like you have the 402 Model then, the same as the one in the auction, I used to have one myself, a 2-voice in G/D. I think Hohner were the UK importers for them, and you have reminded me that the three models were in different keys, as well as having different numbers of reeds.

#6 hielandman

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Posted 26 January 2005 - 10:19 PM

You know, I don't know the model # for sure, and have yet to find the sheet with the model #s and key configurations, but, if the 402 is in G/D, then that is what I have, as it is the identical concertina, woodburned flowers, two frames and all. I got it used four years ago from the button box, in new condition. I have several Klingenthal concertinas, and my first Klingenthal is in Ireland somewhere, with a dub who moved back home after making his "millions" in Amerikay! That one was one of the ones with the painted on wood graining, I got that new in 1989. I played it to death. I also have a red one in D/A, but it plays really slow and hard, and I am not crazy about it. But I almost always prefer a Klingenthal to a Bastari/Stagi, which to my ears, can sometimes(especially on the low notes) sound mushy. If winterblue can get this for under $200.00, he/she will be doing well, as that is a nice concertina in very good condition. I paid a bit more than that four years ago. I called the Klingenthal Harmomikawerks a number of years ago, to see about importing them into the U.S., but could find no-one who spoke English to answer my questions. I was interested in getting one in every key combination, but it didn't happen. I have heard that since the unification of Germany, this company was no longer able to compete, and has gone out of business, at least as far as concertinas go. Anyone know anything about that?

#7 winterblue

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Posted 27 January 2005 - 05:07 PM

Thank you both *very* much for your help for it was much appreciated. After binging a bit with bidding, I did manage to win the auction for around 150. After reading the information posted after my last reply, I feel a little better about putting forth a little extra cash for the concertina, as it sounds like it is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks again =)

Perhaps I shall be back in the near future asking for general concertina help as I am quite new to the genre of instrument.

#8 Daniel Bradbury

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Posted 28 January 2005 - 05:24 PM

[/quote]Perhaps I shall be back in the near future asking for general concertina help as I am quite new to the genre of instrument.

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I expect we will see you back. You will need us for companionship as you soon shall be abandoned by friends, family and pets alike. Don't worry though, we are always here! :lol:

#9 Polly Wilson

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 11:19 PM

I have to say that the people I have met through playing concertina are more fun than the ones the sweet box has driven away. Cats, however, seem to dislike them rather universally, in my experience. Poor things. That accute hearing of high frequencies must be such a burden...

#10 Michael Reid

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 11:37 PM

Cats, however, seem to dislike them rather universally, in my experience. Poor things. That accute hearing of high frequencies must be such a burden...

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Hmmm. We have two cats, and each is content to be in the room when I play.

#11 spindizzy

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 03:26 AM

Cats, however, seem to dislike them rather universally, in my experience. Poor things. That accute hearing of high frequencies must be such a burden...

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One will give me "the look" and move to the other end of the room. The other will yell and sometimes even try to nip my toes - then goes out in huff. OTOH they neither seem to mind DHs fiddle playing. Hmmm.. maybe they're music critics too!

Chris J.

#12 JimLucas

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 05:15 AM

I have to say that the people I have met through playing concertina are more fun than the ones the sweet box has driven away. Cats, however, seem to dislike them rather universally, in my experience. Poor things. That accute hearing of high frequencies must be such a burden...

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My own experience is that -- like people -- cats and other animals have their personal likes and dislikes, and I'm sure it's far more than just a question of high-frequency sounds. I've known cats that disliked the concertina, cats that loved it, and cats that simply didn't care.

A perhaps more illustrative example has to do with the tin whistle. I was playing my whistle at a friend's house, and her cat seemed curious, but without strong feelings either way. Then her boyfriend gave it a try. The cat stuck its face right up next to the whistle, looking for all the world like it was trying to understand how it was producing the sound, then it bared its claws, drew back its "arm", and took a vicious swipe at the boyfriend. Very clearly, it didn't like what it was hearing, and just as clearly, it knew what was the real source of the annoyance. :)

Besides, I have a friend whose high-frequency hearing is so acute that she can hear the sonar pulses of bats, and she likes the concertina.

#13 Henk van Aalten

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 05:42 AM

A perhaps more illustrative example has to do with the tin whistle.  I was playing my whistle at a friend's house, and her cat seemed curious, but without strong feelings either way.  Then her boyfriend gave it a try.  The cat stuck its face right up next to the whistle, looking for all the world like it was trying to understand how it was producing the sound, then it bared its claws, drew back its "arm", and took a vicious swipe at the boyfriend.  Very clearly, it didn't like what it was hearing, and just as clearly, it knew what was the real source of the annoyance. :)

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The quality of playing might be the reason for the cats behaviour. You should repeat the experiment with a blindfolded cat :ph34r: .
The cat was not only hearing but at the same time seeing! It might well be that the cat accepts this strange behaviour from you ("it's a strange guy anyway"), but not from the other person ("he should behave normal").
Just a hypothesis <_<

Edited by Henk van Aalten, 10 February 2005 - 05:47 AM.


#14 JimLucas

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 06:29 AM

It might well be that the cat accepts this strange behaviour from you ("it's a strange guy anyway"), but not from the other person ("he should behave normal").
Just a hypothesis  <_<

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Unlikely, in my experience.
The more general behavior among animals, including cats, is to be less tolerant of strangers. I presume that's because there's less likelihood of some subsequent benefit to offset the suffering. As far as I know, it's only humans who treat strangers with extra deference, because it's only humans who make a practice of adopting strangers into the local group, thus rendering strangers possible future colleagues, potentially even dominant members of the group, and thus able to take revenge for remembered "offenses".

#15 Bruce McCaskey

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 12:11 PM

When I first started playing concertina my cats tended to exit the room rather abruptly just as soon as the concertina came out.

Either I've improved or they've lowered their standards, because now I have a tough time keeping them off my lap while I'm playing. If I make the mistake of raising the concertina off my leg for just a moment one of my cats literally 'pops' into the spot the concertina occupied and they are typically strongly disinclined to relocate.

Playing the instrument an inch above their heads seems to provide no incentive for them to give up the spot either, though I certainly don't play at the maximum volume the instrument is capable of. I'd suggest that maybe their unconditional acceptance is the result of them having gone deaf, but I note that opening a kitchen cupboard door still draws them out of an apparent deep sleep from three rooms away.

Bruce

#16 spindizzy

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 04:19 PM

.....
Can anyone identify the concertina below and tell me anything about it?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I expect we will see you back.  You will need us for companionship as you soon shall be abandoned by friends, family and pets alike.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Hmmm. We have two cats, and each is content to be in the room when I play.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Unlikely, in my experience.
The more general behavior among animals, including cats, is to be less tolerant of strangers.  .....only humans who make a practice of adopting strangers into the local group, thus rendering strangers possible future colleagues, potentially even dominant members of the group, and thus able to take revenge for remembered "offenses".

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Wow .... thread creep.... it's what keeps me reading every post on every topic regardless of the topic title.

(Apologies for some brutal cut and pastes - I may have ended up with some wrong attributions there, this multiquote of people quoting people can get complicated)

Chris J :D

#17 JimLucas

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 06:06 PM

(Apologies for some brutal cut and pastes  - I may have ended up with some wrong attributions there, ...)

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Dunno about that, but anyone who assumes that was one continuous thread you were quoting is gonna think we're even weirder than we are... difficult though that may seem. B)

#18 Stephen Chambers

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 12:30 AM

Wow .... thread creep....

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Well, just to come back to the supposed Topic of this thread for a minute, I have now found a Hohner London catalogue from the 1980's that confirms my recollection. It lists three models that look exactly like the one initially asked about, but their numbers start with an 8, rather than a 4 :

801
The 801 is a natural finish Concertina with 10 bellow folds and a single middle frame ... it has 20 buttons and 40 reeds and is supplied in the key of C/G.

802
The 802 has 20 buttons, but this time hides 80 individual steel reeds under its natural finish. The bellows have 15 folds and 2 middle frames, and the key is D/G.

803
This concertina is the top-of-the-range model, with 90 reeds and 20 buttons. This natural finished instrument is made with 16 bellows folds and 3 middle frames, and is available in the key of C/G.

Cats, however, seem to dislike them rather universally, in my experience. Poor things. That accute hearing of high frequencies must be such a burden...

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Now to creep back again :

My cat "runs a mile" when I start playing melodeon or concertina, I thought it must be because she was a music critic ... :(

Thanks for telling me otherwise ! :)




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