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Tune Of The Month For November, 2014: Trollspolska


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#37 Tradman

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 10:05 PM

Here's my recording of Trollspolska.  I play it as a bodapolska which is the traditional way it's played and danced in Sweden.  The hambo version seems to have come out of New England and from there crossed back to Sweden.

Attached File  10 - Trollpolska.mp3   1.55MB   61 downloads

 

Here's a YouTube video of me playing a Swedish hambo:  http://youtu.be/ps9OmV21hIE



#38 Jim Besser

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 10:15 PM

Here's my recording of Trollspolska.  I play it as a bodapolska which is the traditional way it's played and danced in Sweden.  The hambo version seems to have come out of New England and from there crossed back to Sweden.

attachicon.gif10 - Trollpolska.mp3

 

Here's a YouTube video of me playing a Swedish hambo:  http://youtu.be/ps9OmV21hIE

 

Very cool. A very different feel.

 

What is a bodapolska, exactly?

 

It's interesting how hambos became associated with New England contra dancing. I think it's something that happened in the 70s and 80s, but I"m not sure.



#39 Tradman

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 11:35 PM

Boda is a town in Dalarna (the so called folkloric region of Sweden).  A bodapolska is a particular couple dance from that town and the surrounding region.  It is characterized by a short first beat and a sweeping second beat where the woman is sort of suspended briefly in the air.

There are lots of examples on YouTube.  Here's a nice one with a strong rhythm, and where you can see the women's movement quite clearly:  http://youtu.be/Cx1qx288lZI



#40 RatFace

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 07:04 AM

My simplified attempt:         http://youtu.be/cPMtrldtd44

 

Have I put some extra beats at the end of the A parts.

 

Yes you have - though the extra beats are quite well disguised! You actually start the B part one beat early, but add an extra beat in the descending phrase that follows, so this bit comes out "in the wash". However, just after this (in the second "answering" descending phrase, starting on F) you add an extra beat (about 3 eighths of the way through the B part), You might want to try playing along to some of the other recordings here to figure it out - or listen to your own recording counting one-gap-three, one-gap-three etc (I tend to sway like a lopo-sided metronome, if that helps!). Nice playing otherwise, though.



#41 spindizzy

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 07:46 AM

My simplified attempt:         http://youtu.be/cPMtrldtd44

 

I have not come across this type of tune before, it has been a struggle, posting now to give it and long suffering wife a rest. Have I put some extra beats at the end of the A parts

 

Nice bouncy playing

..   I think that you have some extra beats in the B part though.



#42 Jim Besser

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 08:20 AM

Boda is a town in Dalarna (the so called folkloric region of Sweden).  A bodapolska is a particular couple dance from that town and the surrounding region.  It is characterized by a short first beat and a sweeping second beat where the woman is sort of suspended briefly in the air.

There are lots of examples on YouTube.  Here's a nice one with a strong rhythm, and where you can see the women's movement quite clearly:  http://youtu.be/Cx1qx288lZI

 

Ah. Same town as the namesake of Waltz from Boda?

 

So one difference is that in a bodapolska, the emphasis is on the second beat, in a hambo on the first. Right?



#43 Bob Michel

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 08:33 AM

I enjoyed listening to these versions so much that they prompted me to do something I've been putting off since the 1990s: join this forum (see my post "Delurking" in "General Concertina Discussions").

I don't play many Scandinavian tunes (I'm more of an ITM type), but I do enjoy a challenge. So here's a first attempt of my own; I hope it's not too unidiomatic. If it is, perhaps someone would like to purchase me a nyckelharpa to set me straight...

Bob Michel

http://youtu.be/grPcD9e-LnU

#44 Jim Besser

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 08:54 AM

I enjoyed listening to these versions so much that they prompted me to do something I've been putting off since the 1990s: join this forum (see my post "Delurking" in "General Concertina Discussions").

I don't play many Scandinavian tunes (I'm more of an ITM type), but I do enjoy a challenge. So here's a first attempt of my own; I hope it's not too unidiomatic. If it is, perhaps someone would like to purchase me a nyckelharpa to set me straight...

Bob Michel

http://youtu.be/grPcD9e-LnU

 

Welcome!  Very nicely done. I hear a few Irish flourishes in there. Excellent arrangement, tasteful accompaniment.



#45 Tradman

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 10:54 AM

Yes.  It's the same town.  Though you have to be careful with names like Waltz from Boda since there are many.  The emphasis may appear to be on the second beat, but it isn't.  Almost all Swedish polskas have main emphasis on the first beat and minor emphasis on the third, but that first beat may not even be played, so it gets very difficult for an unattuned listener to grasp what's going on.  The lengths of the beat and the bow strokes are what varies, so with a non-bowed instrument, one has to adjust as best one can.  In bodapolska, the emphasis is still on the first beat, but since it is shortened, it can sound like the second is getting emphasized.  It's all much clearer if there is a bass player, but if you ever watch a Swedish musician, look at their feet.  The tapping will tell the whole story.

 

 

Boda is a town in Dalarna (the so called folkloric region of Sweden).  A bodapolska is a particular couple dance from that town and the surrounding region.  It is characterized by a short first beat and a sweeping second beat where the woman is sort of suspended briefly in the air.

There are lots of examples on YouTube.  Here's a nice one with a strong rhythm, and where you can see the women's movement quite clearly:  http://youtu.be/Cx1qx288lZI

 

Ah. Same town as the namesake of Waltz from Boda?

 

So one difference is that in a bodapolska, the emphasis is on the second beat, in a hambo on the first. Right?

 



#46 Jim Besser

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 10:57 AM

 

Yes.  It's the same town.  Though you have to be careful with names like Waltz from Boda since there are many.  The emphasis may appear to be on the second beat, but it isn't.  Almost all Swedish polskas have main emphasis on the first beat and minor emphasis on the third, but that first beat may not even be played, so it gets very difficult for an unattuned listener to grasp what's going on.  The lengths of the beat and the bow strokes are what varies, so with a non-bowed instrument, one has to adjust as best one can.  In bodapolska, the emphasis is still on the first beat, but since it is shortened, it can sound like the second is getting emphasized.  It's all much clearer if there is a bass player, but if you ever watch a Swedish musician, look at their feet.  The tapping will tell the whole story.

 

 

Boda is a town in Dalarna (the so called folkloric region of Sweden).  A bodapolska is a particular couple dance from that town and the surrounding region.  It is characterized by a short first beat and a sweeping second beat where the woman is sort of suspended briefly in the air.

There are lots of examples on YouTube.  Here's a nice one with a strong rhythm, and where you can see the women's movement quite clearly:  http://youtu.be/Cx1qx288lZI

 

Ah. Same town as the namesake of Waltz from Boda?

 

So one difference is that in a bodapolska, the emphasis is on the second beat, in a hambo on the first. Right?

 

 

 

The Valse from Boda that was a c.net Tune of the Month a while back is very popular on the contra dance circuit in the US.  We played it at a big contra last week.

 

I don't play a lot of Scandi music, but I can get by - if I can watch dancers. If not, I find the subtleties of rhythm very difficult.



#47 Sunny Jim

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 04:03 PM

Best I can do so far.

https://soundcloud.c...-1/trollspolka1



#48 Jim Besser

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 04:23 PM

 

Thanks! What instrument are you playing? I'm guessing English by the fluidity.



#49 Sunny Jim

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 04:49 PM

 

 

Thanks! What instrument are you playing? I'm guessing English by the fluidity.

 

English  Morse Geordie tenor. I can't do bass line chords, so  sort of smudged the melody line.



#50 shelly0312

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 09:29 PM

......wow!  do I sound good when I "duet" with Danny or Tradman!!!!!........snort.....



#51 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 01:59 AM

I enjoyed listening to these versions so much that they prompted me to do something I've been putting off since the 1990s: join this forum (see my post "Delurking" in "General Concertina Discussions").

I don't play many Scandinavian tunes (I'm more of an ITM type), but I do enjoy a challenge. So here's a first attempt of my own; I hope it's not too unidiomatic. If it is, perhaps someone would like to purchase me a nyckelharpa to set me straight...

Bob Michel

http://youtu.be/grPcD9e-LnU

 

You're giving the tune a lovely melancholic feeling here, another proof of the capability of a great piece of folk music of diversity of interpretation without exhausting its potential!

 

Best wishes - Wolf


Edited by blue eyed sailor, 21 November 2014 - 01:59 AM.


#52 blue eyed sailor

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 02:07 AM

 

 

 

Thanks! What instrument are you playing? I'm guessing English by the fluidity.

 

English  Morse Geordie tenor. I can't do bass line chords, so  sort of smudged the melody line.

 

Sort of like an Ultravox version of the tune...  B)



#53 RatFace

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 05:17 AM

 

I liked this!



#54 Sunny Jim

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 10:12 AM

 

 

 

 

Thanks! What instrument are you playing? I'm guessing English by the fluidity.

 

English  Morse Geordie tenor. I can't do bass line chords, so  sort of smudged the melody line.

 

Sort of like an Ultravox version of the tune...  B)

 

Not a bad description ;-)    About right for my vintage as well.






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