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Theme Of The Month For September, 2014: Something Classical


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#19 Daria

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 09:49 PM

I was looking through an old classical music piano book and found Robert Schumann's Merry Peasant ,which after I played it, I realized is the same song as the American folk tune Redwing .Schumann wrote Merry Peasant as an exercise for the left hand, so it was a good learning experience for me to play the melody on the left hand and harmony on the right.  

 

https://soundcloud.c...asant-redwing-3


Edited by Daria, 14 October 2014 - 09:34 PM.


#20 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:00 PM

I was looking through an old classical music piano book and found Robert Schumann's Merry Peasant ,which after I played it, I realized is the same song as the American folk tune Redwing .Schumann wrote Merry Peasant as an exercise for the left hand, so it was a good learning experience for me to play the melody on the left hand and harmony on the right.  

 

 

 

https://soundcloud.c...asant-redwing-3

 

Very enjoyable blend of the two tunes, and a good hint to playing melody in the bass from time to time too...



#21 brandon

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 05:13 AM

Very nice go at this tune(s). I'm' astounded you've only been playing for 8 months. I can't remember...are you playing an anglo or a duet? 



#22 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 05:25 AM

Very nice go at this tune(s). I'm' astounded you've only been playing for 8 months. I can't remember...are you playing an anglo or a duet? 

 

Anglo



#23 adrian brown

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Posted 27 September 2014 - 06:33 AM

A little effort from me here - Lully's marche pour la ceremonie des Turcs as remembered rather than read from dots. There's probably enough parallel fifths and octaves there to make my harpsicord-playing chums climb the walls, but well, I like it like that!

 

Adrian


Edited by aybee, 27 September 2014 - 06:34 AM.


#24 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 27 September 2014 - 06:59 AM

Thanks for posting Adrian, love it!

Best wishes to all of you - Wolf

#25 chas

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Posted 27 September 2014 - 11:26 AM

A little effort from me here - Lully's marche pour la ceremonie des Turcs as remembered rather than read from dots. There's probably enough parallel fifths and octaves there to make my harpsicord-playing chums climb the walls, but well, I like it like that!

 

Adrian

More power to your parallel fifths. That sounds great.



#26 David Barnert

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Posted 27 September 2014 - 04:18 PM

Here's a repost. 19th century classical music. Erik Satie's Gnossienne #1.

http://youtu.be/pb0ye0Gs_Bs

Sorry, I'm using my wife's iPad today and don't immediately see a way to make that link active. Maybe I'll fix it next time I'm on my Mac.

#27 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 27 September 2014 - 04:37 PM

the link works David - good choice for going "classical" with the concertina!



#28 Tootler

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Posted 27 September 2014 - 05:15 PM

A nice one Geoff, and you really give it a Renaissance feel with your restraining and strict chording...

 

Welcome to the self-accompanied song - department here with this successful debut!

 

And as to my own instrumental contrib, thank you very much for the kind words Jim, Sarah, and Brandon (looking forward  to listening to your duet!), very glad it's appealing to you!

 

Best - Wolf

Very tardy of me but thanks for your kind comments, Wolf.



#29 adrian brown

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 05:11 AM

Thanks for your nice comments guys, glad you like it! I actually have another "classical" piece I can share here, recorded during one of our concerts earlier this year. It's a set of variations on the tune "The Queen's Almain" which was one the 16th century's "greatest hits". Although it's rather too early a piece to speak of a basso continuo, playing the lowest lines on the concertina, certainly gives it that feel. It's one of the only pieces in our repetoire I've not been able to play standing up, since the bass lines at the end are just too awkward to feel comfortable. We've recently recorded it for our new CD, which will be out in December.

 

Adrian



#30 Wolf Molkentin

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 05:48 AM

Delightful Adrian! Looking forward to the release of your new CD...



#31 brandon

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 07:37 AM

Here's a repost. 19th century classical music. Erik Satie's Gnossienne #1.
 

 

David, this is a lovely and mesmerizing piece. Do you have the dots available? I'd love to add it to the list of 'try this' for my EC and maybe post my version here next September...

 

Adrian - the 2 pieces are great examples of different approaches to the role of the instrument. I enjoy hearing examples of how people make concertinas fit into small ensembles. I'd also like to learn Lully at some point - are the dots available for this one?

 

Brandon



#32 sqzbxr

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 08:42 AM

Brandon, score is available for viewing or download here:

 

http://imslp.org/wik...s_(Satie,_Erik)



#33 David Barnert

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 09:05 AM

David, this is a lovely and mesmerizing piece. Do you have the dots available? I'd love to add it to the list of 'try this' for my EC and maybe post my version here next September...

Brandon, score is available for viewing or download here:

 

http://imslp.org/wik...s_(Satie,_Erik)

 

Ahh, it looks like somebody beat me to it. sqzbxr's response appeared as I was preparing this:

 

IMSLP.org is a great repository for classical music scores and recordings. The original piano version of this piece is available there (it is in F minor, I play it in D minor):
 
 
Scroll about 1/2 way down the page (or use your browser's "find" command) to find "1. Lent" and click on it. You may also have to agree to a copyright disclaimer, but you will soon be looking at the score. Note that Satie wrote it entirely without bar lines and without a time signature, although it clearly sounds like 4/4 and you could draw the bar lines in with the measures defined by the bass line, which is all whole notes.
 
No point giving you my arrangement, as it is for Hayden Duet and goes below the range of an EC.



#34 brandon

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 05:20 AM

Thanks to both of you!



#35 adrian brown

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 06:28 AM

Thanks again Wolf, glad you liked it!

 

 


 

Adrian - the 2 pieces are great examples of different approaches to the role of the instrument. I enjoy hearing examples of how people make concertinas fit into small ensembles. I'd also like to learn Lully at some point - are the dots available for this one?

 

Brandon

 

 

Hi Brandon, thanks to you too, is abc notation okay?

 

X:1
T:Marche pour la cérémonie des Turcs
C: Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632 - 1687)
Q:1/4=120
L:1/4
M:4/4
K:C
"Am"e2"E"e2|"F"c>BAa|"Am"e>^f"Em"gg|"G"g2"C"e2|"F"f>e"G"e>d|"C"c4:|
"C"g2"E"^g2|"Am"a>bc'b/2a/2|"E"b2ee|"Am"e>a"D"^f>b|"E"^g/2>^f/2e"F"aa|"F"a>b"E"b>a/2b/4|
"Am"c'>b a/2g/2f/2e/2|"Dm"d/2e/2B/2c/2"E"B>A|"Am"A2"F"aa|"F"a>b"E"b>a/2b/4|"Am"c'>b a/2g/2f/2e/2|"Dm"d/2e/2B/2c/2"E"B>A|"Am"A4|]

 

hope this works, otherwise send me a p.m. with your address and I'll e-mail you a pdf.

 

Note that I'm playing it on a concertina in AbEb at old pitch, but in true SA and brass band fashion, I think of it as a CG, so the end result sounds somewhat lower than written!

 

Adrian

 



#36 Jim Besser

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 10:32 AM

Here's a repost. 19th century classical music. Erik Satie's Gnossienne #1.

http://youtu.be/pb0ye0Gs_Bs

Sorry, I'm using my wife's iPad today and don't immediately see a way to make that link active. Maybe I'll fix it next time I'm on my Mac.

 

VEry nice, David. Putting the attributes of a duet to very good use.






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